Topic Editors

College of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Prof. Dr. Zhiguo Zhou
Key Laboratory of Crop Ecophysiology and Management, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, College of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Dr. Wenqing Zhao
Key Laboratory of Crop Ecophysiology and Management, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, College of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China

Advances in Industrial Crops Physioecology and Sustainable Cultivation

Abstract submission deadline
closed (29 February 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
30 April 2024
Viewed by
9926

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Industrial crops, including fiber, forest, energy crops, rubber and resins, cultivated medicinal and aromatic plants, etc., play important roles in human life. However, under the background of global climate change, frequent meteorological disasters will significantly reduce these crops’ production and quality, which will seriously restrict the sustainable production of these crops. Studying the physiological and ecological response mechanism to the changes of different environmental factors is an important approach to developing supporting cultivation techniques and an important basis for realizing the sustainable development of these crops. Therefore, manuscripts related to the physiological, ecological, and molecular mechanisms of industrial crops (non-food) in response to different environmental factors during its yield and quality formation process or related to the exploration of sustainable production approaches of industrial crop production are accepted.

Dr. Wei Hu
Prof. Dr. Zhiguo Zhou
Dr. Wenqing Zhao
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • agronomy
  • abiotic stress
  • yield
  • quality
  • climate change

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 3.6 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Crops
crops
- - 2021 30.5 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Seeds
seeds
- - 2022 29.3 Days CHF 1000 Submit

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Published Papers (7 papers)

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12 pages, 20399 KiB  
Article
Design and Testing of the Double-Symmetric Eccentric Exciter for Fruit Tree Vibration Harvest
by Haobo Jiao, Juming Luo, Aifei Tang, Lihong Wang, Chen Ma, Yaping Li and Chengsong Li
Agriculture 2024, 14(4), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14040570 - 02 Apr 2024
Viewed by 390
Abstract
The amplitude of excitation force from exciters used in fruit tree vibration harvesting remains constant at a given frequency, leading to poor fruit detachment ratio and tree damage. A solution has been proposed through the development of a Double-Symmetric Eccentric Exciter (DSEE). This [...] Read more.
The amplitude of excitation force from exciters used in fruit tree vibration harvesting remains constant at a given frequency, leading to poor fruit detachment ratio and tree damage. A solution has been proposed through the development of a Double-Symmetric Eccentric Exciter (DSEE). This new exciter allows for the adjustment of excitation force amplitude while maintaining a constant frequency by varying the phase angle of the DSEE. To validate the effectiveness of the DSEE, vibration tests were conducted on fruit trees using different parameter exciting forces. Acceleration sensors were employed to measure the vibration accelerations of the tree branches. The experimental results revealed that when a fixed frequency excitation force with a constant phase angle was applied to the trunk, the vibration acceleration of branches exhibited inconsistent variations due to differences in the vibration differential equation parameters of each branch. Furthermore, it was observed that increasing the phase angle of the DSEE at a fixed frequency led to larger vibration accelerations in every branch. This signifies that adjusting the phase angle of the DSEE can effectively increase the amplitude of the exciting force. Consequently, the ability to control both the amplitude and frequency of the excitation force independently can mitigate issues such as low fruit harvest rates and minimize damage to fruit trees. Full article
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18 pages, 2012 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Maize Intercropping with Peanut and Phosphorus Application Maintains Sustainable Farmland Productivity by Improving Soil Aggregate Stability and P Availability
by Zhiman Zan, Nianyuan Jiao, Rentian Ma, Jiangtao Wang, Yun Wang, Tangyuan Ning, Bin Zheng, Ling Liu, Xupeng Zhao and Wenfeng Cong
Agronomy 2023, 13(11), 2846; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13112846 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 981
Abstract
The intercropping of maize (Zea mays L.) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) (M||P) significantly enhances crop yield. In a long-term M||P field experiment with two P fertilizer levels, we examined how long-term M||P affects topsoil aggregate fractions and stability, organic carbon [...] Read more.
The intercropping of maize (Zea mays L.) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) (M||P) significantly enhances crop yield. In a long-term M||P field experiment with two P fertilizer levels, we examined how long-term M||P affects topsoil aggregate fractions and stability, organic carbon (SOC), available phosphorus (AP), and total phosphorus (TP) in each aggregate fraction, along with crop yields. Compared to their respective monocultures, long-term M||P substantially increased the proportion of topsoil mechanical macroaggregates (7.6–16.3%) and water-stable macroaggregates (>1 mm) (13.8–36.1%), while reducing the unstable aggregate index (ELT) and the percentage of aggregation destruction (PAD). M||P significantly boosted the concentration (12.9–39.9%) and contribution rate (4.1–47.9%) of SOC in macroaggregates compared to single crops. Moreover, the concentration of TP in macroaggregates (>1 mm) and AP in each aggregate fraction of M||P exceeded that of the respective single crops (p < 0.05). Furthermore, M||P significantly increased the Ca2-P, Ca8-P, Al-P, and Fe-P concentrations of intercropped maize (IM) and the Ca8-P, O-P, and Ca10-P concentrations of intercropped peanuts (IP). The land equivalent ratio (LER) of M||P was higher than one, and M||P stubble improved the yield of subsequent winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) compared with sole-crop maize stubble. P application augmented the concentration of SOC, TP, and AP in macroaggregates, resulting in improved crop yields. In conclusion, our findings suggest that long-term M||P combined with P application sustains farmland productivity in the North China Plain by increasing SOC and macroaggregate fractions, improving aggregate stability, and enhancing soil P availability. Full article
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19 pages, 3892 KiB  
Article
The Soils of Natural (In Situ) Coenopopulations of Taraxacum kok-saghyz L.E. Rodin in Kazakhstan
by Kairat Uteulin, Beibut Suleimenov and Konstantin Pachikin
Agronomy 2023, 13(11), 2737; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13112737 - 30 Oct 2023
Viewed by 771
Abstract
This article studies the morphological and physicochemical properties of soils in the natural habitat of dandelion kok-saghyz (Taraxacum kok-saghyz L.E. Rodin) (TKS)—a source of high-quality rubber. The purpose of the work is to study the natural soil habitat of dandelion TKS in [...] Read more.
This article studies the morphological and physicochemical properties of soils in the natural habitat of dandelion kok-saghyz (Taraxacum kok-saghyz L.E. Rodin) (TKS)—a source of high-quality rubber. The purpose of the work is to study the natural soil habitat of dandelion TKS in comparison with the nearby area where TKS is absent. The methods of soil research are comparative, geographical, morphological, and analytical. Soil sections were laid down and georeferenced, and relief, vegetation, and morphological structures of soil profiles by genetic horizons were described. A database of the physical and chemical properties of soils by horizon was created. Landscapes and soil conditions of in situ populations have been studied in the Kegen District of the Almaty region in the territory of the Kegen River floodplain, in the areas of the Jalauly and Kegen villages, and in the zone of groundwater inclination north of Saryzhas village. The natural soil habitat of TKS was studied. It was found that TKS grows in conditions of moisture floodplains of intermountain valleys on saline floodplain meadowy soils of a sulfate–sodium composition with a high content of total humus and nutrient elements in an alkaline environment. Full article
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15 pages, 4396 KiB  
Article
Drought Stress and High Temperature Affect the Antioxidant Metabolism of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Anthers and Reduce Pollen Fertility
by Jipeng Zhang, Mengdie Cheng, Nan Cao, Yongjun Li, Shanshan Wang, Zhiguo Zhou and Wei Hu
Agronomy 2023, 13(10), 2550; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13102550 - 03 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 880
Abstract
Both drought and high temperature can influence the antioxidant metabolism of crop reproductive organs in different ways, affecting the fertility of reproductive organs and yield formation. However, the combined effects of drought stress and high temperature on the crop reproductive physiology have not [...] Read more.
Both drought and high temperature can influence the antioxidant metabolism of crop reproductive organs in different ways, affecting the fertility of reproductive organs and yield formation. However, the combined effects of drought stress and high temperature on the crop reproductive physiology have not yet been widely considered. In order to broaden our understanding of this mechanism of influence, a pond experiment was conducted using a cotton variety Yuzaomian 9110 divided into four treatment groups: control (CK), drought stress (DS), high temperature (HT), and drought stress coupled with high temperature (DS+HT). Results showed a significant negative correlation between pollen viability and superoxide anion (O2) content, as well as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Compared with CK, DS did not alter O2 content in anthers, but HT treatment resulted in higher anther O2. Compared with single-stress groups, DS+HT further promoted the formation of O2 in anthers, leading to more malondialdehyde in anthers. Moreover, a higher H2O2 content in anthers was found in DS and HT than in CK. DS+HT did not show altered H2O2 content relative to HT treatment, although its H2O2 was higher than in DS. Further analyses of the antioxidant enzyme system showed that DS had no significant effect on superoxide dismutase gene (GhCu/ZnSOD) expression, but HT and DS+HT significantly downregulated its expression. The expression of GhCu/ZnSOD was lower under DS+HT than HT, which might be why O2 content was not altered under DS treatment compared with CK and was higher in DS+HT than HT. DS and HT significantly downregulated the expression of the peroxidase gene (GhPOD) and catalase gene (GhCAT), which should be the main reason for the larger accumulation of H2O2 under drought stress and high-temperature conditions. Compared with single-stress groups, DS+HT had lower expression of GhCAT, resulting in a larger H2O2 content. Regarding the ascorbic acid–glutathione (AsA–GSH) cycle, DS and HT significantly downregulated the expression of monodehydroascorbate reductase gene (GhMDHAR) to hinder the production of AsA and upregulated the expression of ascorbate oxidase gene (GhAAO) to promote the oxidation of AsA, which was theoretically detrimental to AsA accumulation. However, HT downregulated the expression of the ascorbate peroxidase gene (GhAPX), hindering the reduction of H2O2 by AsA, which was the reason for AsA and H2O2 accumulation. Moreover, DS also significantly upregulated the expression of the dehydroascorbate reductase gene (GhDHAR2) to enhance the reduction of dehydroascorbate to form AsA, leading to a higher content of AsA under DS than HT. The combined stress significantly downregulated the expression of GhAAO to inhibit the oxidation of AsA but significantly upregulated the expression of GhMDHAR and GhDHAR2, promoting the AsA production, and downregulated the expression of GhAPX, hindering the reduction of H2O2 by AsA. All these resulted in increased AsA content under combined stresses. In addition, HT significantly downregulated the glutathione reductase gene (GhGR) expression, hindering the reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG), which led to the reduction of GSH. However, DS and DS+HT significantly downregulated the glutathione peroxidase gene (GhGPX) expression, resulting in the accumulation of GSH. Overall, compared with single-stress treatments, the effects of DS+HT on cotton pollen fertility and peroxide accumulation were more significant. The effects of DS+HT on the antioxidant enzyme system were mainly caused by high temperature, while the mechanism of abnormal accumulation of AsA and GSH caused by DS+HT was different from those of single-stress groups. Full article
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15 pages, 1064 KiB  
Review
Mitigating Salinity Stress and Improving Cotton Productivity with Agronomic Practices
by Dongmei Zhang, Yanjun Zhang, Lin Sun, Jianlong Dai and Hezhong Dong
Agronomy 2023, 13(10), 2486; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13102486 - 27 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1220
Abstract
In saline and salinity-affected soils, the global productivity and sustainability of cotton are severely affected by soil salinity. High salt concentrations hinder plant growth and yield formation mainly through the occurrence of osmotic stress, specific ion toxicity, and nutritional imbalance in cotton. A [...] Read more.
In saline and salinity-affected soils, the global productivity and sustainability of cotton are severely affected by soil salinity. High salt concentrations hinder plant growth and yield formation mainly through the occurrence of osmotic stress, specific ion toxicity, and nutritional imbalance in cotton. A number of agronomic practices have been identified as potential solutions to alleviate the adverse effects induced by salinity. While genetic breeding holds promise in enhancing the salinity tolerance of cotton, agronomic practices that improve the root zone environment, ameliorate soil conditions, and enhance salinity tolerance are currently considered to be more practical. This compressive review highlights the effectiveness of agronomic practices, such as furrow seeding, plastic mulching, their combination, densely planting, and the appropriate application of fertilizer and plant growth regulators, in mitigating the negative impact of salinity on cotton. By implementing these agronomic practices, cotton growers can improve the overall performance and resilience of cotton crops in saline and salinity-affected soils. This review provides valuable insights into practical agronomic measures that can be adopted to counteract the adverse consequences of soil salinity on cotton cultivation. Full article
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20 pages, 2694 KiB  
Review
Opportunities and Challenges of Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L.) Genetic Improvement
by Michela Landoni, Greta Bertagnon, Martina Ghidoli, Elena Cassani, Fabrizio Adani and Roberto Pilu
Agronomy 2023, 13(8), 2076; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13082076 - 07 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3383
Abstract
Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) originated in East Africa and then diffused to warm-temperate, subtropical, and tropical regions of the world. The high lipid content in the castor beans is extracted for use in pharmaceutical and industrial applications. The castor oil lipid [...] Read more.
Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) originated in East Africa and then diffused to warm-temperate, subtropical, and tropical regions of the world. The high lipid content in the castor beans is extracted for use in pharmaceutical and industrial applications. The castor oil lipid profile is naturally composed of 90% ricinoleic acid and the remaining 10% is mainly composed of linoleic, oleic, stearic, and linolenic fatty acids. The highly toxic compound ricin within the seeds is insoluble in oil, making castor oil free from this toxin and safe to use for industrial and cosmetic applications. Among the main uses of castor oil are reported industrial uses such as component for lubricants, paints, coatings, polymers, emulsifiers, cosmetics, and medicinal uses as a laxative. There is also significant commercial potential for utilization of the whole castor bean plant such as animal feed, fertilizer, biofuel, and also for phytoremediation. Several breeding programs have been planned to improve the castor’s characteristics needed for its current or potential uses. In this review, after summarizing data on castor bean agronomy and uses, we focus on the main advances in Castor bean classical and biotechnological breeding programs, underlining the high potential of this oil crop. In particular, the main challenges of castor breeding programs are to increase yield, mainly through the selection of growth habits allowing mechanized harvest, and beneficial compound content, mainly the oil, and to decrease the toxic compounds content, mainly ricin. Full article
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17 pages, 3237 KiB  
Article
Bacillus methylotrophicus Could Improve the Tolerance and Recovery Ability of the Tomato to Low-Temperature Stress and Improve Fruit Quality
by Guobin Li, Tieli Peng, Feng Qu, Junzheng Wang, Yanghao Long and Xiaohui Hu
Agronomy 2023, 13(7), 1902; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13071902 - 19 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1004
Abstract
Low-temperature stress seriously affects the growth, development, yield, and quality of tomato production. Bacillus methylotrophicus is an important plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). However, the role of B. methylotrophicus under low-temperature stress is poorly understood. Accordingly, the effects of B. methylotrophicus (‘VL-10′) on [...] Read more.
Low-temperature stress seriously affects the growth, development, yield, and quality of tomato production. Bacillus methylotrophicus is an important plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). However, the role of B. methylotrophicus under low-temperature stress is poorly understood. Accordingly, the effects of B. methylotrophicus (‘VL-10′) on tomato cold stress (15 °C/8 °C, 12 h/12 h, and day/night) were studied. B. methyltrophicus ‘VL-10′ was added into the substrate at the time of sowing, and the plants were treated at a low temperature for 2 weeks after 40 days of growth. We found that the low temperature reduced the spatial distribution of the aboveground and underground sections of tomatoes and the leaf SPAD and photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm). After low-temperature stress, the tomato flowering was delayed, the vitamin C and lycopene content in fruit decreased, and the nitrate content increased. However, inoculated with B. methyltrophicus ‘VL-10′ during sowing promoted the growth of tomato seedlings, enhanced the native defense ability of the tomatoes, and effectively reduced the cold shock response of the roots to cold damage and the adverse effects of low temperature on leaf SPAD and Fv/Fm. After the cultivation at normal temperature, the inoculat B. methyltrophicus ‘VL-10′ could rapidly regain plant growth levers, and eliminate the delay of low temperature on flowering. TOPSIS analysis showed that the nutritional quality of tomatoes could be effectively improved by inoculation with B. methyltrophicus ‘VL-10′ regardless of normal cultivation or low-temperature stress. Full article
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