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Urban and Natural Wetland Carbon Cycle

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Air, Climate Change and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2023) | Viewed by 3395

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110086, China
Interests: carbon cycle

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Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 852, China
Interests: carbon cycling; greenhouse gas flux; biogeochemistry; wetlands; soil management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wetlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle as a result of the large amounts of organic carbon that are stored in vegetation and soils. They are increasingly considered to play an important role in carbon peak and carbon neutralization. However, the carbon turnover in different types of wetland ecosystems and their potential for carbon emission reduction and carbon sink increase are unclear. The aim of this Special Issue is to present the syntheses, case studies, recent information, and creative thinking concerning the carbon cycles in urban and natural wetlands.

Potential authors are invited to contribute original research on and related to the following topics:

  • Wetland carbon budget accounting methodology;
  • Hydrogeological and ecohydrological sustainability in urban and natural wetlands;
  • Urban wetland and sustainable development of urban economy;
  • Comparative study on carbon turnover between urban and natural wetlands;
  • Wetland protection compensation mechanism;
  • Impacts of human activities on wetland carbon cycle;
  • Current situation of wetland resources and carbon cycle;
  • Quantitative study on the effect of wetlands on carbon neutralization;
  • Information management needed for sustainable carbon management of wetlands;
  • Wetland conservation case studies;
  • Study on carbon assessment of wetland restoration system;
  • Monitoring: its role in enhancing wetland carbon management.

The intended audiences for this work are scholars, students, environmental and conservation practitioners, and naturalists interested in improving scientific understanding, and the application of that understanding to better inform future research, management, and policies.

Dr. Jiaoyue Wang
Prof. Dr. Derrick Y.F. Lai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wetland ecosystem
  • restoration system
  • human activity
  • management
  • carbon assessment
  • carbon turnover
  • monitoring

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1740 KiB  
Article
Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Temperate Peatland under Simulated Enhanced Nitrogen Deposition
by Xue Meng, Zhiguo Zhu, Jing Xue, Chunguang Wang and Xiaoxin Sun
Sustainability 2023, 15(2), 1010; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15021010 - 5 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1470
Abstract
Nitrogen (N) deposition has increased in recent years and is significantly affected by global change and human activities. Wetlands are atmospheric CH4 and N2O sources and may be affected by changes in N deposition. To reveal the effects of increased [...] Read more.
Nitrogen (N) deposition has increased in recent years and is significantly affected by global change and human activities. Wetlands are atmospheric CH4 and N2O sources and may be affected by changes in N deposition. To reveal the effects of increased N deposition on peatland greenhouse gas exchange, we observed the CH4 and N2O emissions from controlled microcosms collected from a temperate peatland in the Xiaoxing’an mountains, Northeast China. We found that the moss biomass did not change, but the total herb biomass increased by 94% and 181% with 5 and 10-times-higher N deposition, respectively. However, there were no significant changes in CH4 emissions from the microcosms with N addition. The unchanged CH4 emissions were mainly caused by the opposite effect of increased nitrate and ammonium concentrations on soil CH4 production and the increased plant biomass on CH4 emission. We also found that the manipulated microcosms with 5 and 10-times-higher N deposition had 8 and 20-times-higher seasonal average N2O emissions than the control microcosms, respectively. The increased N2O emissions were mainly caused by short-term (≤7 d) pulse emissions after N addition. The pulse N2O emission peaks were up to 1879.7 and 3836.5 μg m−2 h−1 from the microcosms with 5 and 10-times-higher N deposition, respectively. Nitrate and ammonium concentrations increasing in the soil pore water were the reason for the N2O emissions enhanced by N addition. Our results indicate that the increase in N deposition had no effects on the CH4 emissions but increased the N2O emissions of the temperate peatland. Moreover, pulse emissions are very important for evaluating the effect of N addition on N2O emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban and Natural Wetland Carbon Cycle)
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16 pages, 1560 KiB  
Article
Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a Main Tributary of the Yangtze River, Eastern China
by Yuqing Miao, Fanghu Sun, Weilin Hong, Fengman Fang, Jian Yu, Hao Luo, Chuansheng Wu, Guanglai Xu, Yilin Sun and Henan Meng
Sustainability 2022, 14(21), 13729; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142113729 - 23 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1462
Abstract
Rivers and streams are recognized as potential greenhouse gas (GHGs: CO2, CH4, and N2O) sources, contributing to global warming. However, GHG emissions from rivers and streams have received insufficient attention compared to other ecosystems (forests, grasslands, wetlands, [...] Read more.
Rivers and streams are recognized as potential greenhouse gas (GHGs: CO2, CH4, and N2O) sources, contributing to global warming. However, GHG emissions from rivers and streams have received insufficient attention compared to other ecosystems (forests, grasslands, wetlands, etc.). In this study, dissolved GHG concentrations were measured in the Qingyijiang River, the longest tributary in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, during two campaigns in September 2020 and April 2021. Our results showed that the Qingyijiang River was oversaturated with dissolved GHGs. The dissolved GHG concentration in the surface river water ranged from 8.70 to 67.38 μM CO2, 0.03 to 2.06 μM CH4, and 12.30 to 32.22 nM N2O. The average diffusive GHG emission rates were 31.89 ± 22.23 mmol CO2 m−2 d−1, 697.22 ± 939.82 μmol CH4 m−2 d−1, and 18.12 ± 7.73 μmol N2O m−2 d−1. The total emissions (CO2-e) were CO2 (58%) dominated, while CH4 (38%) played a moderate role in total emissions. Temporally, average GHG concentrations and fluxes from the studied river in April were higher than those in September. The concentration and flux of CH4 exhibited high spatial variability, similar to those in most rivers. In contrast, we found that there was no obvious spatial variability in CO2 and N2O concentrations but a significant difference among reaches in N2O fluxes. We found that water temperature and flow velocity were the potential drivers for the regulating spatial variability in GHGs. However, no other observed limnological parameters were found in governing the spatial patterns of GHGs, suggesting a complex combination of factors governing GHG fluxes; thus, these inconspicuous mechanisms underscore the need for further research. Overall, our study suggests that this river acts as a minor source of GHGs relative to other rivers, and CH4 cannot be ignored when considering aquatic carbon emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban and Natural Wetland Carbon Cycle)
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