remotesensing-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

InSAR Imaging of Coastal Geohazards

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2024) | Viewed by 5343

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Geological Engineering and Geomatics, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China
Interests: SAR; InSAR; land subsidence; landslides; glacier movement; collapse
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There are about 300,000 kilometers of coastlines in the world. Almost half the world’s population lives in coastal regions, which makes coastal cities the important economic and social centers in a country. On one hand, high-rise buildings, land reclamation, human-made islands, and underground constructions are widely developed to extend the living space. On the other hand, rising sea levels, costal erosion, and increasing underground resource extraction make coastal regions vulnerable to the effects of natural and anthropogenic hazards. Rapid social–economic growth has changed the geological environment of coastal cities, and a series of geological hazards have been seriously intensified, including coastal erosion, coastal subsidence, sinkhole collapse, seawater intrusion, landslides, permafrost degradation, and infrastructure instability.

In recent decades, with the advancement of satellite and air-borne SAR sensors of high spatial resolution, short revisit days and multi-polarization, interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques, including persistent scatterer InSAR, distributed scatterer InSAR, tomography SAR (TomoSAR), and polarimetric InSAR (PolInSAR), have significantly advanced the mapping and characterization of coastal geohazards over large scales. Meanwhile, in situ measurements such as high-frequency GNSS are crucial to the studies of coastal hazards.

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish scientific articles exploring coastal geohazards through the use of spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based SAR images. Topics may include algorithms, applications, mechanism studies, and hazard assessment and mitigation methods regarding diverse geohazards in coastal regions.

Prof. Dr. Chaoying Zhao
Prof. Dr. Zhong Lu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • radar remote sensing
  • InSAR
  • GNSS and reflectometry
  • deep learning
  • land subsidence
  • anthropogenic hazards
  • sinkhole collapse
  • infrastructure stability
  • coastal erosion
  • coastal landslides
  • permafrost degradation
  • reclamation land deformation
  • modelling of coastal deformation

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

30 pages, 6653 KiB  
Article
Integrated Assessment of Coastal Subsidence in Nansha District, Guangzhou City, China: Insights from SBAS-InSAR Monitoring and Risk Evaluation
by Simiao Wang, Huimin Sun, Lianhuan Wei, Pengcheng Pi, Min Zeng, Yujie Pan, Zixuan Xue and Xuehan Jiang
Remote Sens. 2024, 16(2), 248; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs16020248 - 8 Jan 2024
Viewed by 878
Abstract
Monitoring and assessing coastal subsidence is crucial to mitigating potential disaster risks associated with rising sea levels. Nansha District in Guangzhou City, representing global coastal soft-soil urban areas, faces significant challenges related to ground subsidence. However, the current understanding of the status, causative [...] Read more.
Monitoring and assessing coastal subsidence is crucial to mitigating potential disaster risks associated with rising sea levels. Nansha District in Guangzhou City, representing global coastal soft-soil urban areas, faces significant challenges related to ground subsidence. However, the current understanding of the status, causative factors, and risk (includes subsidence susceptibility and vulnerability) assessment of ground subsidence in Nansha District is unclear. To address this gap, we utilized the SBAS-InSAR technique, analyzing 49 Sentinel-1A images from December 2015 to June 2019, for systematic ground subsidence monitoring. Subsequently, we assessed subsidence risk using a comprehensive index method and a risk matrix. Our findings indicate that subsidence velocity primarily ranged from −40 to −5 mm/a, with a spatial pattern of increasing subsidence from inland to coastal areas. The cumulative subsidence process unfolded in four distinct stages. The genesis of land subsidence was linked to an endogenous geological context dominated by soft-soil deposition, influenced by external factors such as surface loading and groundwater extraction. High-risk zones were concentrated in key engineering development areas, transportation pipeline trunk lines, and densely populated regions, demanding special attention. This study provides a foundational resource for disaster prevention and control strategies in Nansha District and similar coastal cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue InSAR Imaging of Coastal Geohazards)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 9274 KiB  
Article
Multi-Source SAR-Based Surface Deformation Monitoring and Groundwater Relationship Analysis in the Yellow River Delta, China
by Yilin Liu, Yi Zhang, Faqiang Zhao, Renwei Ding, Lihong Zhao, Yufen Niu, Feifei Qu and Zilong Ling
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(13), 3290; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15133290 - 27 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1262
Abstract
Land motions are significantly widespread in the Yellow River delta (YRD). There is, however, a lack of understanding of the delta-wide comprehensive deformation mode and its dynamic mechanism, especially triggered by groundwater extraction. This paper adopts an integrated analysis of multidisciplinary data of [...] Read more.
Land motions are significantly widespread in the Yellow River delta (YRD). There is, however, a lack of understanding of the delta-wide comprehensive deformation mode and its dynamic mechanism, especially triggered by groundwater extraction. This paper adopts an integrated analysis of multidisciplinary data of image geodesy, geophysics, geology and hydrogeology to provide insights into Earth surface displacement patterns and dynamics in the YRD. Delta-scale land motions were measured for the first time using L-band ALOS images processed using multi-temporal InSAR, illustrating multiple obvious surface sinking regions and a maximum annual subsidence velocity of up to 130 mm. Then, the InSAR-constrained distributed point source model with optimal kernel parameters, a smoothness factor of 10 and a model grid size of 300 m was established and confirmed to be rational, reliable and accurate for modeling analysis over the YRD. Remarkable horizontal surface displacements, moving towards and converging on a sinking center, were recovered by means of modeling and measured using InSAR, with a maximum rate of up to 60 mm per year, which can trigger significant disasters, such as ground fissures and building damage. In addition, the annual total water storage variation at the delta scale, the most meaningful outcome, can be calculated and reaches a total of approximately 12,010 × 103 m3 in Guangrao city, efficiently filling the gap of GRACE and in situ investigations for delta-wide aquifer monitoring. Finally, a comparative analysis of time series InSAR measurements, modeling outcomes, and fault and groundwater data was conducted, and the strong agreement demonstrates that faults control aquifer distribution and hence the spatial distribution of groundwater-withdrawal-related regional land subsidence. Moreover, the obvious asymmetric displacements, demonstrating a northeasterly displacement trend, further reveal that faults control aquifer distribution and Earth surface deformation. These findings are useful for understanding the land motion patterns and dynamics, helping to sustainably manage groundwater and control disasters in the YRD and elsewhere worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue InSAR Imaging of Coastal Geohazards)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research

13 pages, 15555 KiB  
Technical Note
Land Subsidence in the Singapore Coastal Area with Long Time Series of TerraSAR-X SAR Data
by Zechao Bai, Yanping Wang, Mengwei Li, Ying Sun, Xuedong Zhang, Yewei Wu, Yang Li and Dan Li
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(9), 2415; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15092415 - 5 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2038
Abstract
Global sea level rise is a major environmental concern for many countries and cities, particularly for low-lying coastal areas where urban development is threatened by the combined effects of sea level rise and land subsidence. This study employed an improved two-layer network Persistent [...] Read more.
Global sea level rise is a major environmental concern for many countries and cities, particularly for low-lying coastal areas where urban development is threatened by the combined effects of sea level rise and land subsidence. This study employed an improved two-layer network Persistent Scatterers Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) technology to obtain high-precision land subsidence in Singapore from 2015 to 2019. Landsat images from 1973 to 2020 were also utilized to extract changes in Singapore’s coastline. Geological, topographical, and global sea level rise data were integrated to investigate the causes and impacts of land subsidence in Singapore. The results indicate that the areas with severe subsidence coincide with land reclamation areas, where subsidence is mainly due to soil consolidation. Based on WorldDEM, land subsidence, and sea level rise data, the maximum inundation depth in Singapore by 2050 is estimated to be 1.24 m, with the Marina Bay area in Singapore’s central business district being the most vulnerable to sea level rise. This study provides data support and a scientific basis for understanding the impact of land subsidence on Singapore’s coastal areas under the influence of multiple factors using advanced InSAR technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue InSAR Imaging of Coastal Geohazards)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop