Technologies for Production, Processing, and Extractions of Nature Product Compounds, 2nd Volume

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Separation Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 781

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Sciences, University of Palermo, 90128 Palermo, Italy
Interests: metabolomics analyses of food products; analytical techniques; green extraction technologies; fruit and vegetables; bio-transformed products; multivariate statistical analysis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is the second volume of the previously successful Special Issue "Technologies for Production, Processing, and Extractions of Nature Product Compounds" (Link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/processes/special_issues/nature_product_compounds).

Natural bioactive compounds include a plethora of structures and functionalities that provide a consistent pool of molecules for the production of nutraceuticals, functional foods, and food additives. Moreover, they have also shown great market potential for industrial applications in the pharmaceutic and cosmetic sectors. These compounds, which are produced and recovered from various biological sources (such as fruits, vegetables, medicinal plants, wastes, and byproducts), can be found in nature either at high concentration (i.e., polyphenols) or at very low levels, such that massive harvesting is needed to obtain sufficient amounts. Indeed, their structural diversity and complexity make chemical synthesis unprofitable. The development of advanced technologies has been fundamental for overcoming the inherent difficulties in screening and producing these compounds. Traditionally, they are extracted via conventional liquid–liquid or solid–liquid extraction techniques, but this approach implies negative thermal influences on extraction yield and quality with a large expenditure of organic solvents and energy. Moreover, with the growing consumer demands for greener alternatives that do not involve toxic chemicals, as well as the industry’s concerns around sustainable, nontoxic routes of extraction, the applications of novel extraction technologies (including, for instance, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction, as well as their combination) are becoming more and more widespread.

This Special Issue of the journal Processes on “Technologies for Production, Processing, and Extractions of Nature Product Compounds” aims to group original research and review articles about the setting and optimization of production and processing strategies, as well as conventional and innovative extraction technologies of natural compounds.

Dr. Pasquale Crupi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • natural product chemistry
  • biological sources
  • leftovers
  • production methods
  • processing
  • non-conventional extractions
  • methods of analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 1601 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Reverse Sorption on an Extraction Kinetics Melanin Case
by Igor Lomovskiy, Aleksey Kiryanov and Tatiana Skripkina
Processes 2023, 11(11), 3192; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11113192 - 08 Nov 2023
Viewed by 457
Abstract
Research into extraction kinetics is one of the crucial factors in a technological process. Extraction is used predominantly when working with organic feedstock. The study of the kinetics of extraction of a substance is a complex process, which is influenced by a large [...] Read more.
Research into extraction kinetics is one of the crucial factors in a technological process. Extraction is used predominantly when working with organic feedstock. The study of the kinetics of extraction of a substance is a complex process, which is influenced by a large number of factors. This paper presents an analysis of one of these factors, namely the influence of reverse sorption on the process of substance release from the matrix. Sorption can directly affect the intraparticle diffusion constants and, consequently, the rate of release of the substance. Using buckwheat husk as an example, its sorption capacity was assessed to assess the sorption factor on the rate of melanin release. To select the optimal parameters of the chemical process, the experiment was carried out at temperatures of 40, 50, and 60 degrees Celsius. The Axelrud and Baker–Lonsdale equations were used to describe the kinetic models. Full article
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