Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-Based Functional Materials

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart and Functional Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 November 2024 | Viewed by 1728

Special Issue Editors

Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Interests: molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs); sensors; sensor automation; quartz crystal microbalance; catalysis; wastewater and solid waste treatment; environmental chemistry; new energy sources; low-carbon technologies

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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

A molecular imprinting polymer (MIP), often described as a polymer made of a molecular lock to match a molecular key, contains tailor-made binding sites complementary to the template molecules in shape, size and functional groups. Owing to their unique features of structural predictability, recognition specificity and application universality, MIPs have found a wide range of applications in various fields, including sample pretreatment/chromatographic separation (solid phase extraction, monolithic column chromatography, etc.) and chemical/biological sensing (electrochemical sensing, fluorescence sensing, etc.). 

We invite the submission of research articles and reviews to a Special Issue in Polymers. This Special Issue aims to present the most recent developments in molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based functional materials. MIP-based sensors coupled with various sensing platforms, including colorimetric assays, fluorescent assays, luminescent assays, SERS, quartz crystal microbalance, (local) surface plasmonic resonance, potentiometry, amperometry, transistors, impedance, electrochemosensors, ELISA, etc., are within the scope of this Special Issue. MIPs have been used as biological and chemical sensors, receptors and electrodes for the detection of contaminants, biomarkers, toxins, air and water pollutants and chemical and biological substances as well. In addition, the wide applications of MIPs as selective adsorbents and functional materials in medical, biomedical, chemical, environmental, agriculture and other fields are also within the scope of this Special Issue. MIPs could be used alone or, in many cases, in composite forms along with quantum dots, nanoparticles, nanotubes, MXenes, metal organic frameworks, magnetic particles, membranes, films, conducting polymers and so on. Research on their synthesis, characterization and computational- or artificial intelligence-assisted design for further development and applications is also welcome.

Dr. Xuanhao Lin
Prof. Dr. Jiangyong Hu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs)
  • molecular imprinting technology
  • selective sensors
  • biosensors
  • chemosensors
  • electrochemical sensors
  • functional materials
  • conducting polymers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 6868 KiB  
Article
Block and Statistical Copolymers of Methacrylate Monomers with Dimethylamino and Diisopropylamino Groups on the Side Chains: Synthesis, Chemical Modification and Self-Assembly in Aqueous Media
by Kalliopi Makri and Stergios Pispas
Polymers 2024, 16(9), 1284; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16091284 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 641
Abstract
The synthesis of amphiphilic diblock and statistical (random) copolymers of poly(dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate) and poly((2-(diisopropylamino) ethyl methacrylate) using the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique (RAFT polymerization) is reported. The precursor copolymers were chemically modified to create derivative copolymers of polyelectrolyte and polyampholyte [...] Read more.
The synthesis of amphiphilic diblock and statistical (random) copolymers of poly(dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate) and poly((2-(diisopropylamino) ethyl methacrylate) using the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique (RAFT polymerization) is reported. The precursor copolymers were chemically modified to create derivative copolymers of polyelectrolyte and polyampholyte nature with novel solution properties. Moreover, their molecular and physicochemical characteristics, as well as their self-assembly in aqueous media as a function of molecular architecture and composition, are investigated by using size exclusion chromatography, spectroscopic characterization techniques and light scattering techniques. Furthermore, the behavior and properties of the obtained micelles and aggregates were studied, depending on the pH, temperature and ionic strength of the aqueous solutions. The response of the systems to changes in these parameters shows interesting behavior and new properties that are useful for their utilization as nanocarriers of pharmaceutical compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-Based Functional Materials)
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13 pages, 3274 KiB  
Article
Ion-Imprinted Polymer-Based Sensor for the Detection of Mercury Ions
by Kit Meng Low, Xuanhao Lin, Huanan Wu and Sam Fong Yau Li
Polymers 2024, 16(5), 652; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16050652 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 775
Abstract
In this work, the development of a novel method for the detection of mercury (II) ions in wastewater using a mercury ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) combined with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is described. The IIP was successfully synthesized via the polymerization of a [...] Read more.
In this work, the development of a novel method for the detection of mercury (II) ions in wastewater using a mercury ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) combined with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is described. The IIP was successfully synthesized via the polymerization of a of a novel fluorescein- and 2-aminophenol-functionalized methacrylic acid monomer, which was noted to have high binding affinity to mercury (II) ions. This polymer was subsequently coated on a QCM chip to create an IIP-QCM sensor. This sensor was established to have high selectivity and good sensitivity to mercury (II) ions, and had a limit of detection (LOD) of 14.17 ppb, a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 42.94 ppb, a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 4.29, good repeatability, and a working range of 42.94 ppb to 2 ppm. The sensor was also able to analyze tap water and wastewater samples. The IIP-QCM is, therefore, promising as a highly selective, cost-effective, and rapid mercury ion sensor for applications involving the detection of mercury in wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-Based Functional Materials)
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