Plant Tissue Culture and Secondary Metabolites

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 3385

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail
Guest Editor
Biological Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 181 Ipsin-gil, Jeongeup 56212, Republic of Korea
Interests: plant tissue culture; hairy roots; secondary metabolites; metabolic profiling; antioxidant; antimicrobial

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Crop Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Republic of Korea
Interests: plant tissue culture; hairy roots; secondary metabolites; metabolic profiling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of a variety of hairy roots from many plant species has resulted in genetic stability, rapid root growth, and biosynthesis of bioactive compounds. Indeed, hairy roots have been obtained from many plant sources for the production of most groups of secondary metabolites, including phenolics, alkaloids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and others. Plant secondary metabolites are molecules that are not essential to plant survival but have important plant development, growth, reproduction, and protection roles. These are widely distributed in higher plant species and possess biological properties associated with plant defense against biological and physical stresses. Furthermore, the intake of edible plants containing many secondary metabolites is beneficial to human health due to their biological activities, and anti-allergic, anti-cancer, anti-microbial, and antioxidant properties.

Dr. Hyeonji Yeo
Dr. Sangun Park
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant tissue culture
  • hairy roots
  • Agrobacterium rhizogenes
  • secondary metabolites
  • metabolic profiling
  • antioxidant
  • antimicrobial

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

18 pages, 1586 KiB  
Article
Production of Polyphenolic Natural Products by Bract-Derived Tissue Cultures of Three Medicinal Tilia spp.: A Comparative Untargeted Metabolomics Study
by Zsolt Szűcs, Zoltán Cziáky, László Volánszki, Csaba Máthé, Gábor Vasas and Sándor Gonda
Plants 2024, 13(10), 1288; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13101288 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 380
Abstract
Medicinal plant tissue cultures are potential sources of bioactive compounds. In this study, we report the chemical characterization of the callus cultures of three medicinal Tilia spp. (Tilia cordata, Tilia vulgaris and Tilia tomentosa), along with the comparison to bracts [...] Read more.
Medicinal plant tissue cultures are potential sources of bioactive compounds. In this study, we report the chemical characterization of the callus cultures of three medicinal Tilia spp. (Tilia cordata, Tilia vulgaris and Tilia tomentosa), along with the comparison to bracts and flowers of the same species. Our aim was to show that calli of Tilia spp. are good alternatives to the calli of T. americana for the production of polyphenols and are better sources of a subset of polyphenolic metabolites, compared to the original organs. Calli were initiated from young bracts and grown on woody plant medium containing 1 mg L−1 2,4-D and 0.1 mg L−1 BAP. For chemical characterization, a quality-controlled untargeted metabolomics approach and the quantification of several bioactive compounds was performed with the use of LC-ESI-MS/MS. While bracts and flowers contained flavonoid glycosides (astragalin, isoquercitrin) as major polyphenols, calli of all species contained catechins, coumarins (fraxin, esculin and scopoletin) and flavane aglyca. T. tomentosa calli contained 5397 µg g DW−1 catechin, 201 µg g DW−1 esculin, 218 µg g DW−1 taxifolin and 273 µg g DW−1 eriodictyol, while calli from other species contained lower amounts. T. cordata and T. tomentosa flowers were rich in isoquercitrin, containing 8134 and 6385 µg g DW−1, respectively. The currently tested species contained many of the bioactive metabolites described from T. americana. The production of catechin was shown to be comparable to the most efficient tissue cultures reported. Flowers and bracts contained flavonoid glycosides, including tiliroside, resembling bioactive fractions of T. americana. In addition, untargeted metabolomics has shown fingerprint-like differences among species, highlighting possible chemotaxonomic and quality control applications, especially for bracts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Tissue Culture and Secondary Metabolites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 6606 KiB  
Article
Production of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Hairy Root Cultures of Salvia plebeia
by Minsol Choi, Jiwon Yoon, So Hwi Yang, Jae Kwang Kim and Sang Un Park
Plants 2023, 12(22), 3840; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12223840 - 13 Nov 2023
Viewed by 964
Abstract
Salvia plebeia (Lamiaceae) is a medicinal plant containing diverse bioactive constituents that have biological properties. In this study, we determined the optimal conditions (media and auxin) for the hairy root culture of S. plebeia for the growth and accumulation of phenolic compounds and [...] Read more.
Salvia plebeia (Lamiaceae) is a medicinal plant containing diverse bioactive constituents that have biological properties. In this study, we determined the optimal conditions (media and auxin) for the hairy root culture of S. plebeia for the growth and accumulation of phenolic compounds and evaluated its antioxidant activities. Rosmarinic acid and five phenylpropanoids were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The hairy roots grown in 1/2 SH medium with 1 mg/L NAA had a high level of rosmarinic acid content. Hairy roots cultured in 1 mg/L NAA had the highest total content of five phenylpropanoids. Compared to wild-type roots grown in the field, hairy roots (NAA 1) expressed similar levels of rosmarinic acid but significantly enhanced phenylpropanoid accumulation. Furthermore, the total phenolic content and total flavonoid content of hairy roots (NAA 1) were 2.22 and 1.73 times higher than those of wild-type roots. In the results of DPPH, ABTS, and reducing power assays, the hairy roots (NAA 1) showed higher free radical scavenging effects and reduction potential than the wild-type roots. These results suggest that S. plebeia hairy roots cultured under optimal conditions, which exhibit enhanced phenolic compound accumulation and antioxidant activity, can potentially be used as sources of antioxidants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Tissue Culture and Secondary Metabolites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

24 pages, 1948 KiB  
Review
Anthocyanin Production from Plant Cell and Organ Cultures In Vitro
by Hosakatte Niranjana Murthy, Kadanthottu Sebastian Joseph, Kee Yoeup Paek and So-Young Park
Plants 2024, 13(1), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13010117 - 31 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1671
Abstract
Anthocyanins are water-soluble pigments found in plants. They exist in various colors, including red, purple, and blue, and are utilized as natural colorants in the food and cosmetics industries. The pharmaceutical industry uses anthocyanins as therapeutic compounds because they have several medicinal qualities, [...] Read more.
Anthocyanins are water-soluble pigments found in plants. They exist in various colors, including red, purple, and blue, and are utilized as natural colorants in the food and cosmetics industries. The pharmaceutical industry uses anthocyanins as therapeutic compounds because they have several medicinal qualities, including anti-obesity, anti-cancer, antidiabetic, neuroprotective, and cardioprotective effects. Anthocyanins are conventionally procured from colored fruits and vegetables and are utilized in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. However, the composition and concentration of anthocyanins from natural sources vary quantitively and qualitatively; therefore, plant cell and organ cultures have been explored for many decades to understand the production of these valuable compounds. A great deal of research has been carried out on plant cell cultures using varied methods, such as the selection of suitable cell lines, medium optimization, optimization culture conditions, precursor feeding, and elicitation for the production of anthocyanin pigments. In addition, metabolic engineering technologies have been applied for the hyperaccumulation of these compounds in varied plants, including tobacco and arabidopsis. In this review, we describe various strategies applied in plant cell and organ cultures for the production of anthocyanins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Tissue Culture and Secondary Metabolites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop