Functionalized Polymers in Drug Delivery

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 1653

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Romania Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Grigore T. Popa"—Iași, 700115 Iasi, Romania
Interests: organic synthesis; chitosan microparticles and nanoparticles; antioxidant activity; diabetes mellitus type 2; drug delivery systems; drug loading; release profile
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Romania Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Grigore T. Popa"—Iași, 700115 Iasi, Romania
Interests: nanofibers; natural polymers; tissue engineering, wound dressing; release profile; antioxidant activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, the technological methods of obtaining and modifying polymers to correct their limitations with the preservation of physiological and biological properties have grown exponentially in view of their applications and performances. Poor mechanical qualities, low half-life, susceptibility to breakdown by enzymes or ROS, and being challenging to dissolve in water or other common organic reagents, make them problematic in practical applications, and are a few of the limitations exhibited by most polymers. To overcome these drawbacks, polymers can be processed using various physical or chemical approaches, including copolymerization.

Functionalization of polymers has proven its applicability in various fields, such as tissue engineering, biomedical fields, drug delivery, imaging, and the development of innovative materials.

This Special Issue, "Functionalized Polymers in Drug Delivery,"  compiles original research and review articles from eminent academics who are passionate about this research topic.

This Special Issue welcomes research that reflects recent breakthroughs and challenges in the synthesis and applications of functionalized polymers, polymer technology, and advanced materials.

Dr. Florentina Lupascu
Dr. Andreea Iacob
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • functionalized polymeric architectures
  • polymer crosslinking
  • side-chain engineering
  • biodegradable polymers
  • copolymerization
  • self-healing
  • self-adapting
  • nanoparticles
  • hydrogels
  • microparticles
  • films
  • nanofibers
  • target drug carriers
  • solubility improvement

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

18 pages, 3570 KiB  
Review
Recent Progress in Diatom Biosilica: A Natural Nanoporous Silica Material as Sustained Release Carrier
by Hayeon Lim, Yoseph Seo, Daeryul Kwon, Sunggu Kang, Jiyun Yu, Hyunjun Park, Sang Deuk Lee and Taek Lee
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(10), 2434; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15102434 - 09 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1252
Abstract
A drug delivery system (DDS) is a useful technology that efficiently delivers a target drug to a patient’s specific diseased tissue with minimal side effects. DDS is a convergence of several areas of study, comprising pharmacy, medicine, biotechnology, and chemistry fields. In the [...] Read more.
A drug delivery system (DDS) is a useful technology that efficiently delivers a target drug to a patient’s specific diseased tissue with minimal side effects. DDS is a convergence of several areas of study, comprising pharmacy, medicine, biotechnology, and chemistry fields. In the traditional pharmacological concept, developing drugs for disease treatment has been the primary research field of pharmacology. The significance of DDS in delivering drugs with optimal formulation to target areas to increase bioavailability and minimize side effects has been recently highlighted. In addition, since the burst release found in various DDS platforms can reduce drug delivery efficiency due to unpredictable drug loss, many recent DDS studies have focused on developing carriers with a sustained release. Among various drug carriers, mesoporous silica DDS (MS-DDS) is applied to various drug administration routes, based on its sustained releases, nanosized porous structures, and excellent solubility for poorly soluble drugs. However, the synthesized MS-DDS has caused complications such as toxicity in the body, long-term accumulation, and poor excretion ability owing to acid treatment-centered manufacturing methods. Therefore, biosilica obtained from diatoms, as a natural MS-DDS, has recently emerged as an alternative to synthesized MS-DDS. This natural silica carrier is an optimal DDS platform because culturing diatoms is easy, and the silica can be separated from diatoms using a simple treatment. In this review, we discuss the manufacturing methods and applications to various disease models based on the advantages of biosilica. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functionalized Polymers in Drug Delivery)
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