Advances and Challenges in Biofabrication and Organ-on-a-Chip Platforms

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B2: Biofabrication and Tissue Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 6424

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Center for Microelectromechanical Systems; University of Minho; 4800-058 Guimaraes, Portugal
Interests: nanotechnology; nanomedicine; biosensors; drug delivery; hyperthermia; microfluidic devices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Center for Microelectromechanical Systems; University of Minho; 4800-058 Guimaraes, Portugal
Interests: biotechnology; microfabrication; microfluidic devices; piezoresistive pressure microsensors; resistance temperature microdetectors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Biomechanics, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering (IBB), Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Tokyo, Japan
Interests: biointerface; biomaterial; biodevices; cell and tissue engineering; microfluidics; drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Mechanical Engineering Department, Minho University, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: biomicrofluidics; microcirculation; biofluid mechanics; blood-on-chips; conventional and confocal micro-PIV; nanofluids; energy and environment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organ-on-a-chip platforms—microscale recapitulations of human organs—are a hot topic in human healthcare that promises to improve drug and nanocarrier development pipelines, personalized drug administration, and early detection of diseases or body disorders by reducing the existent bias between preclinical and clinical trials. However, the microfabrication, 3D bioprinting techniques, mass transport mechanisms, and integration of robust biosensing systems remains a challenge that needs to be addressed in order to standardize organ-on-a-chip platforms.

With this in mind, this Special Issue, entitled Advances and Challenges in Biofabrication and Organ-on-a-Chip Platforms, seeks to gather the breakthroughs achieved and innovative development techniques conducted in these multidisciplinary fields, aiming at the end use of organ-on-a-chip platforms. Therefore, it is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, short communications, and reviews are welcome. Examples of application areas include, but are not limited to, biofabrication, drug screening and discovery, nanomedicine screening, cellular/organ event monitoring, microfluidic cell capture, and cell/tissue analysis using biosensing systems.

Dr. Raquel Rodrigues
Dr. Diana Pinho
Dr. Paulo J. Sousa
Prof. Dr. Hirokazu Kaji 
Prof. Dr. Graça Minas
Prof. Dr. Rui A. Lima
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organ-on-a-chip
  • biofabrication
  • biosensors
  • 3D bioprinting
  • microfabrication of organ-on-a-chip platforms
  • microfluidics in organ-on-a-chip platforms
  • drug delivery in organ-on-a-chip platforms
  • cell/tissues analysis
  • micro/nanochemistry
  • MEMS/NEMS
  • cell culture platforms

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 2528 KiB  
Article
Importance of Spatial Arrangement of Cardiomyocyte Network for Precise and Stable On-Chip Predictive Cardiotoxicity Measurement
by Kazufumi Sakamoto, Suguru Matsumoto, Nanami Abe, Mitsuru Sentoku and Kenji Yasuda
Micromachines 2023, 14(4), 854; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14040854 - 14 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1398
Abstract
One of the advantages of human stem cell-derived cell-based preclinical screening is the reduction of the false negative/positive misjudgment of lead compounds for predicting their effectiveness and risks during the early stage of development. However, as the community effect of cells was neglected [...] Read more.
One of the advantages of human stem cell-derived cell-based preclinical screening is the reduction of the false negative/positive misjudgment of lead compounds for predicting their effectiveness and risks during the early stage of development. However, as the community effect of cells was neglected in the conventional single cell-based in vitro screening, the potential difference in results caused by the cell number and their spatial arrangement differences has not yet been sufficiently evaluated. Here, we have investigated the effect of the community size and spatial arrangement difference for cardiomyocyte network response against the proarrhythmic compounds from the viewpoint of in vitro cardiotoxicity. Using three different typical types of cell networks of cardiomyocytes, small cluster, large square sheet, and large closed-loop sheet were formed in shaped agarose microchambers fabricated on a multielectrode array chip simultaneously, and their responses were compared against the proarrhythmic compound, E-4031. The interspike intervals (ISIs) in large square sheets and closed-loop sheets were durable and maintained stable against E-4031 even at a high dose of 100 nM. In contrast, those in the small cluster, which fluctuated even without E-4031, acquired stable beating reflecting the antiarrhythmic efficacy of E-4031 from a 10 nM medium dose administration. The repolarization index, field potential duration (FPD), was prolonged in closed-loop sheets with 10 nM E-4031, even though small clusters and large sheets remained normal at this concentration. Moreover, FPDs of large sheets were the most durable against E-4031 among the three geometries of cardiomyocyte networks. The results showed the apparent spatial arrangement dependence on the stability of their interspike intervals, and FPD prolongation, indicating the importance of the geometry control of cell networks for representing the appropriate response of cardiomyocytes against the adequate amount of compounds for in vitro ion channel measurement. Full article
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12 pages, 4057 KiB  
Article
Fabrication and Evaluation of Tubule-on-a-Chip with RPTEC/HUVEC Co-Culture Using Injection-Molded Polycarbonate Chips
by Ju-Bi Lee, Hyoungseob Kim, Sol Kim and Gun Yong Sung
Micromachines 2022, 13(11), 1932; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13111932 - 9 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2024
Abstract
To simulate the ADME process such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in the human body after drug administration and to confirm the applicability of the mass production process, a microfluidic chip injection molded with polycarbonate (injection-molded chip (I-M chip)) was fabricated. Polycarbonate [...] Read more.
To simulate the ADME process such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in the human body after drug administration and to confirm the applicability of the mass production process, a microfluidic chip injection molded with polycarbonate (injection-molded chip (I-M chip)) was fabricated. Polycarbonate materials were selected to minimize drug absorption. As a first step to evaluate the I-M chip, RPTEC (Human Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells) and HUVEC (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells) were co-cultured, and live and dead staining, TEER (trans-epithelial electrical resistance), glucose reabsorption, and permeability were compared using different membrane pore sizes of 0.4 μm and 3 μm. Drug excretion was confirmed through a pharmacokinetic test with metformin and cimetidine, and the gene expression of drug transporters was confirmed. As a result, it was confirmed that the cell viability was higher in the 3 μm pore size than in the 0.4 μm, the cell culture performed better, and the drug secretion was enhanced when the pore size was large. The injection-molded polycarbonate microfluidic chip is anticipated to be commercially viable for drug screening devices, particularly ADME tests. Full article
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18 pages, 4082 KiB  
Article
Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Shear Stress Influence on Cellular Viability in Serpentine Vascular Channels
by Khemraj Deshmukh, Saurabh Gupta, Kunal Mitra and Arindam Bit
Micromachines 2022, 13(10), 1766; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13101766 - 18 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2021
Abstract
3D bioprinting has emerged as a tool for developing in vitro tissue models for studying disease progression and drug development. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the influence of flow driven shear stress on the viability of cultured cells inside [...] Read more.
3D bioprinting has emerged as a tool for developing in vitro tissue models for studying disease progression and drug development. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the influence of flow driven shear stress on the viability of cultured cells inside the luminal wall of a serpentine network. Fluid–structure interaction was modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics for representing the elasticity of the serpentine wall. Experimental analysis of the serpentine model was performed on the basis of a desirable inlet flow boundary condition for which the most homogeneously distributed wall shear stress had been obtained from numerical study. A blend of Gelatin-methacryloyl (GelMA) and PEGDA200 PhotoInk was used as a bioink for printing the serpentine network, while facilitating cell growth within the pores of the gelatin substrate. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded into the channels of the network to simulate the blood vessels. A Live-Dead assay was performed over a period of 14 days to observe the cellular viability in the printed vascular channels. It was observed that cell viability increases when the seeded cells were exposed to the evenly distributed shear stresses at an input flow rate of 4.62 mm/min of the culture media, similar to that predicted in the numerical model with the same inlet boundary condition. It leads to recruitment of a large number of focal adhesion point nodes on cellular membrane, emphasizing the influence of such phenomena on promoting cellular morphologies. Full article
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