Natural Metabolites on Gut Microbiome Modulation

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Advances in Metabolomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 5889

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA
Interests: gut microbiome; gut metabolites; bacterial infection; probiotics; bacteriophages

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gut microbiome plays a major role in the maintenance of human heath, while gut microbiome deviations are involved in the progress and development of human diseases. Modulation of gut microbiome in a healthy state has been a promising strategy for maintaining human health and disease therapy. Natural metabolites, including primary and secondary metabolites from plants, fungi and bacteria, are important resources for developing gut microbiome modulators. Although some natural metabolites have demonstrated potential roles in gut microbiome modulation, more studies are needed to distinguish novel natural metabolites and explore how they improve human health and combat human diseases via modulating gut microbiome. This Special Issue engages with, but is not limited to the following topics:

  • Studying the structures and roles of natural metabolites on gut microbiome;
  • New techniques on developing novel natural metabolites as gut microbiome modulators;
  • Optimization of known natural metabolites as gut microbiome modulators;
  • Roles of natural metabolites on human health and diseases through modulating gut microbiome;
  • Mechanisms linking natural metabolites and gut microbiome as well as human health conditions.

Dr. Shaohua Wang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • natural metabolites
  • gut microbiome
  • gut microbiome modulator
  • human health
  • human diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

12 pages, 619 KiB  
Review
From Mother to Infant, from Placenta to Gut: Understanding Varied Microbiome Profiles in Neonates
by Riadh Cheddadi, Venkata Yeramilli and Colin Martin
Metabolites 2023, 13(12), 1184; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13121184 - 05 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1256
Abstract
The field of human microbiome and gut microbial diversity research has witnessed a profound transformation, driven by advances in omics technologies. These advancements have unveiled essential connections between microbiome alterations and severe conditions, prompting the development of new frameworks through epidemiological studies. Traditionally, [...] Read more.
The field of human microbiome and gut microbial diversity research has witnessed a profound transformation, driven by advances in omics technologies. These advancements have unveiled essential connections between microbiome alterations and severe conditions, prompting the development of new frameworks through epidemiological studies. Traditionally, it was believed that each individual harbored unique microbial communities acquired early in life, evolving over the course of their lifetime, with little acknowledgment of any prenatal microbial development, but recent research challenges this belief. The neonatal microbiome’s onset, influenced by factors like delivery mode and maternal health, remains a subject of intense debate, hinting at potential intrauterine microbial processes. In-depth research reveals associations between microbiome profiles and specific health outcomes, ranging from obesity to neurodevelopmental disorders. Understanding these diverse microbiome profiles is essential for unraveling the intricate relationships between the microbiome and health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Metabolites on Gut Microbiome Modulation)
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18 pages, 1346 KiB  
Review
Tryptophan Metabolism and Gut Microbiota: A Novel Regulatory Axis Integrating the Microbiome, Immunity, and Cancer
by Yingjian Hou, Jing Li and Shuhuan Ying
Metabolites 2023, 13(11), 1166; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13111166 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3555
Abstract
Tryptophan metabolism and gut microbiota form an integrated regulatory axis that impacts immunity, metabolism, and cancer. This review consolidated current knowledge on the bidirectional interactions between microbial tryptophan processing and the host. We focused on how the gut microbiome controls tryptophan breakdown via [...] Read more.
Tryptophan metabolism and gut microbiota form an integrated regulatory axis that impacts immunity, metabolism, and cancer. This review consolidated current knowledge on the bidirectional interactions between microbial tryptophan processing and the host. We focused on how the gut microbiome controls tryptophan breakdown via the indole, kynurenine, and serotonin pathways. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota induces disruptions in tryptophan catabolism which contribute to disorders like inflammatory conditions, neuropsychiatric diseases, metabolic syndromes, and cancer. These disruptions affect immune homeostasis, neurotransmission, and gut-brain communication. Elucidating the mechanisms of microbial tryptophan modulation could enable novel therapeutic approaches like psychobiotics and microbiome-targeted dietary interventions. Overall, further research on the microbiota-tryptophan axis has the potential to revolutionize personalized diagnostics and treatments for improving human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Metabolites on Gut Microbiome Modulation)
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