Application of Metabolomics in Food Fermentation

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Metabolomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 776

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of the Peloponnese, 24100 Kalamata, Greece
Interests: physicochemical aspects in food biotechnology; food quality and safety; kinetic study of alcoholic fermentation; physical chemistry of interfaces
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: physicochemical aspects of food processing; the development of new chromatographic techniques for determining physicochemical quantities; physicochemical studies of alcoholic fermentation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; probiotics; functional foods; dairy products; meat products; bacterial genetics; genomics; metagenomics; bacteriocins
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermentation is a biochemical process, underpinned by the activities of microorganisms, that transform substrates within raw materials. Via metabolism, fermenting organisms yield a plethora of low-molecular-weight compounds (typically <1500 Da), including peptides, amino acids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, and vitamins. These metabolites not only impart novel flavors and textures, but also enhance the nutritional value of the resultant fermented products.

Within the realm of food science, metabolomics serves as a powerful analytical tool that concurrently identifies and quantifies the diverse array of metabolites spawned by microbial metabolism during fermentation. The comprehensive profiling of these compounds offers invaluable insights into the myriad biochemical pathways and chemical transformations that define the fermentation process at various stages.

The focus of this Special Issue is to reveal the pivotal role of metabolomics as a state-of-the-art approach for pinpointing a vast spectrum of microbial metabolites within fermentation ecosystems. We will include studies that venture into the development of both targeted and untargeted metabolomic analyses, harnessing the prowess of high-throughput mass spectrometry technologies to dissect and understand the complex metabolite networks in fermented foods.

Dr. John Kapolos
Dr. Athanasia Koliadima
Dr. Konstantinos Papadimitriou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • fermented foods
  • metabolomics
  • targeted metabolomics
  • untargeted metabolomics
  • microorganisms
  • mass spectrometry
  • yogurt
  • cheese
  • beer
  • wine
  • fermented vegetables
  • fermented meet

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 18541 KiB  
Article
Changes in Metabolite Profiles of Chinese Soy Sauce at Different Time Durations of Fermentation Studied by 1H-NMR-Based Metabolomics
by Jalal Uddin, Samra Yasmin, Ghulam Mustafa Kamal, Mufarreh Asmari, Muhammad Saqib and Heyu Chen
Metabolites 2024, 14(5), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14050285 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 510
Abstract
Fermentation parameters, especially the duration, are important in imparting a peculiar taste and flavor to soy sauce. The main purpose of this research was to monitor metabolic changes occurring during the various time intervals of the fermentation process. NMR-based metabolomics was used to [...] Read more.
Fermentation parameters, especially the duration, are important in imparting a peculiar taste and flavor to soy sauce. The main purpose of this research was to monitor metabolic changes occurring during the various time intervals of the fermentation process. NMR-based metabolomics was used to monitor the compositional changes in soy sauce during fermentation. The 1H-NMR spectra of the soy sauce samples taken from the fermentation tanks at 0 to 8 months were analyzed using 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and the obtained spectra were analyzed by multivariate statistical analysis. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square Discriminate analysis (PLSDA) revealed the separation of samples fermented for various time durations under identical conditions. Key metabolites shown by corresponding loading plots exhibited variations in amino acids (lysine, threonine, isoleucine, etc.), acetate, glucose, fructose, sucrose, ethanol, glycerol, and others. The levels of ethanol in soy sauce increased with longer fermentation durations, which can be influenced by both natural fermentation and the intentional addition of ethanol as a preservative. The study shows that the variation in metabolite can be very efficiently monitored using 1H-NMR-based metabolomics, thus suggestion to optimize the time duration to get the soy sauce product with the desired taste and flavor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Metabolomics in Food Fermentation)
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