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Special Issue "Advanced Ceramics Applied in Healthcare"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced and Functional Ceramics and Glasses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2023) | Viewed by 7085

Special Issue Editors

Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André 09210-580, Brazil
Interests: bioactive glasses; therapeutic ions; bone tissue repairment; bone cancer treatment; hyperthermia; brachytherapy
Einstein's Teaching and Research Institute, Hospital israleita Albert Einstien, São Paulo 05652-900, Brazil
Interests: nanomaterials; magnetic nanoparticles; nanomedicine; therapy; diagnosis; theranostic; cancer; neurodegenerative diseases; magnetic hyperthermia; lab-on-a-chip; molecular imaging; regenerative medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will provide readers with up-to-date information on the recent progress in the use of advanced ceramics materials for healthcare applications, from different perspectives including material science relations, material development and new healthcare designs. We particularly encourage contributions on combinations of ceramic designs and their applications for bringing new options to healthcare.

Contributing papers are welcome to be publish including the following areas, considering both ceramic and composite-based ceramics materials:

  • Materials for biomedical applications;
  • Biohybrids or biomimetics materials for biomedical applications;
  • Scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine;
  • Materials designed by nanomedicine and nanotechnology aiming biomedical applications;
  • Materials used in biofabrication process;
  • Materials biointerfaces, including coatings or surfaces with specific properties;
  • Materials with applications in drug delivery, imaging, theranostics, gene therapy, and immunotherapy;
  • Materials for therapy of diseases, vaccines and precision medicine;
  • Devices for healthcare applications.  

Prof. Dr. Juliana Marchi
Prof. Dr. Lionel Fernel Gamarra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ceramic biomerials
  • scaffolds
  • tissue engineering
  • nanomedicine
  • biomedical applications
  • biofabrication
  • ceramic biointerfaces
  • therapy, diagnostics and theranostics
  • ceramic devices
  • healthcare applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 1141 KiB  
Article
The Light Reflection Changes of Monolithic Zirconia and Lithium Disilicate after Using Two External Staining Kits following by Thermocycling
Materials 2023, 16(5), 2057; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16052057 - 02 Mar 2023
Viewed by 699
Abstract
Background: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the changes of light reflection% on two materials (monolithic zirconia and lithium disilicate) after using two external staining kits following by thermocycling. Methods: Specimens were sectioned from monolithic zirconia (n = 60) and lithium [...] Read more.
Background: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the changes of light reflection% on two materials (monolithic zirconia and lithium disilicate) after using two external staining kits following by thermocycling. Methods: Specimens were sectioned from monolithic zirconia (n = 60) and lithium disilicate (n = 60) then divided into six groups (n = 20). Two different types of external staining kits were used and applied to the specimens. The light reflection% was measured before staining, after staining and after thermocycling using a spectrophotometer. Results: The light reflection% of zirconia was significantly higher compared to lithium disilicate at the beginning of the study (p = 0.005), after staining with kit 1 (p = 0.005) and kit 2 (p = 0.005) and after thermocycling (p = 0.005). For both materials, the light reflection% was lower after staining with Kit 1 compared to kit 2 (p < 0.043). After thermocycling, the light reflection% of lithium disilicate increased (p = 0.027) and was unchanged with Zirconia (p = 0.527). Conclusions: There is a difference between the materials regarding light reflection% as the monolithic zirconia showed higher light reflection% comparing lithium disilicate throughout the entire experiment. For lithium disilicate, we recommend using kit 1 as we found that, after thermocycling, the light reflection% of kit 2 was increased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ceramics Applied in Healthcare)
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14 pages, 3328 KiB  
Article
Impact of Ceramic Material and Preparation Design on Marginal Fit of Endocrown Restorations
Materials 2022, 15(16), 5592; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15165592 - 15 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1589
Abstract
Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of ceramic material and preparation design on the marginal fit of endocrown restorations. Methods: Forty endocrown restorations were CAD/CAM-fabricated for forty extracted maxillary first premolar teeth. Samples were divided into two groups [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of ceramic material and preparation design on the marginal fit of endocrown restorations. Methods: Forty endocrown restorations were CAD/CAM-fabricated for forty extracted maxillary first premolar teeth. Samples were divided into two groups (n = 20) according to the ceramic materials used: Celtra Duo and Vita Enamic. Each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 10) according to the preparation design: with no intraradicular extension and with 3 mm intraradicular extension. The marginal gap was examined using a digital microscope. Results: Celtra Duo without intraradicular extension recorded the least mean marginal gap (7.74 ± 1.55 µm), while Group Celtra Duo with 3 mm intraradicular extension recorded the highest mean marginal gap (29.54 ± 6.32 µm). Group Vita Enamic recorded a lesser marginal gap (18.03 ± 12.11 µm) than group CD (Celtra Duo) (18.64 ± 12.05 µm). There is a statistically non-significant difference between the two groups of materials (p = 0.873). There is a statistically significant difference between the two tested preparation designs (p < 0.001). Conclusion: All groups recorded a marginal gap within clinically accepted values. Material selection may influence the fitting of restorations. Intraradicular extension for endocrown restorations adversely affects the marginal fit, however, the marginal gap is still within the clinically accepted range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ceramics Applied in Healthcare)
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12 pages, 3638 KiB  
Article
Fibroblasts Mediate Ectopic Bone Formation of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics
Materials 2022, 15(7), 2569; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15072569 - 31 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1365
Abstract
Heterogeneity of fibroblasts directly affects the outcome of tissue regeneration; however, whether bioactive ceramics regulate bone regeneration through fibroblasts is unclear. Ectopic bone formation model with biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) implantation was used to investigate the temporal and spatial distribution of fibroblasts around [...] Read more.
Heterogeneity of fibroblasts directly affects the outcome of tissue regeneration; however, whether bioactive ceramics regulate bone regeneration through fibroblasts is unclear. Ectopic bone formation model with biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) implantation was used to investigate the temporal and spatial distribution of fibroblasts around ceramics. The effect of BCP on L929 fibroblasts was evaluated by EdU assay, transwell assay, and qRT-PCR. Further, the effect of its conditioned medium on osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was confirmed by ALP staining. SEM and XRD results showed that BCP contained abundant micro- and macro-pores and consisted of hydrogen-apatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) phases. Subsequently, BCP implanted into mice muscle successfully induced osteoblasts and bone formation. Fibroblasts labelled by vimentin gathered around BCP at 7 days and peaked at 14 days post implantation. In vitro, BCP inhibited proliferation of L929 fibroblast but promoted its migration. Moreover, expression of Col1a1, Bmp2, and Igf1 in L929 treated by BCP increased significantly while expression of Tgfb1 and Acta did not change. ALP staining further showed conditioned media from L929 fibroblasts treated by BCP could enhance osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs. In conclusion, fibroblasts mediate ectopic bone formation of calcium phosphate ceramics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ceramics Applied in Healthcare)
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10 pages, 2361 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Feasibility of NaCaPO4-Blended Zirconia as a New CAD/CAM Material for Dental Restoration
Materials 2021, 14(14), 3819; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14143819 - 08 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1265
Abstract
The computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) fabrication technique has become one of the hottest topics in the dental field. This technology can be applied to fixed partial dentures, removable dentures, and implant prostheses. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of NaCaPO4-blended [...] Read more.
The computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) fabrication technique has become one of the hottest topics in the dental field. This technology can be applied to fixed partial dentures, removable dentures, and implant prostheses. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of NaCaPO4-blended zirconia as a new CAD/CAM material. Eleven different proportional samples of zirconia and NaCaPO4 (xZyN) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Vickers microhardness, and the milling property of these new samples was tested via a digital optical microscope. After calcination at 950 °C for 4 h, XRD results showed that the intensity of tetragonal ZrO2 gradually decreased with an increase in the content of NaCaPO4. Furthermore, with the increase in NaCaPO4 content, the sintering became more obvious, which improved the densification of the sintered body and reduced its porosity. Specimens went through milling by a computer numerical control (CNC) machine, and the marginal integrity revealed that being sintered at 1350 °C was better than being sintered at 950 °C. Moreover, 7Z3N showed better marginal fit than that of 6Z4N among thirty-six samples when sintered at 1350 °C (p < 0.05). The milling test results revealed that 7Z3N could be a new CAD/CAM material for dental restoration use in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ceramics Applied in Healthcare)
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Review

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25 pages, 982 KiB  
Review
Bioactive Glasses as Carriers of Cancer-Targeted Drugs: Challenges and Opportunities in Bone Cancer Treatment
Materials 2022, 15(24), 9082; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15249082 - 19 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1545
Abstract
The treatment of bone cancer involves tumor resection followed by bone reconstruction of the defect caused by the tumor using biomaterials. Additionally, post-surgery protocols cover chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or drug administration, which are employed as adjuvant treatments to prevent tumor recurrence. In this work, [...] Read more.
The treatment of bone cancer involves tumor resection followed by bone reconstruction of the defect caused by the tumor using biomaterials. Additionally, post-surgery protocols cover chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or drug administration, which are employed as adjuvant treatments to prevent tumor recurrence. In this work, we reviewed new strategies for bone cancer treatment based on bioactive glasses as carriers of cancer-targeted and other drugs that are intended for bone regeneration in conjunction with adjuvant treatments. Drugs used in combination with bioactive glasses can be classified into cancer-target, osteoclast-target, and new therapies (such as gene delivery and bioinorganic). Microparticulated, nanoparticulated, or mesoporous bioactive glasses have been used as drug-delivery systems. Additionally, surface modification through functionalization or the production of composites based on polymers and hydrogels has been employed to improve drug-release kinetics. Overall, although different drugs and drug delivery systems have been developed, there is still room for new studies involving kinase inhibitors or antibody-conjugated drugs, as these drugs have been poorly explored in combination with bioactive glasses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ceramics Applied in Healthcare)
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