Biodegradable Biomaterials and Metallic Implants in Tissue Engineering

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology and Tissue Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2022) | Viewed by 7012

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Clinic for Dermatology and Venerology, Rostock University Medical Center, Strempelstr. 13, 18057 Rostock, Germany
Interests: wound healing; soft tissue regeneration; biomaterials; toxicity and compatibility testing; DNA repair; skin cancer; skin; melanoma mutation
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Guest Editor
Clinic and Policlinic for Dermatology and Venereology, University Medical Center Rostock, 18057 Rostock, Germany
Interests: bone substitutes; collagen-based biomaterials for soft and hard tissue regeneration; foreign body response to biomaterials; inflammation; macrophages, multinucleated giant cells, degradation processes of biomaterials; phagocytosis; vascularization; histology; immunohistochemistry; histomorphometry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A broad variety of biodegradable biomaterials based on both natural and synthetic origin are already on the market. Interestingly, knowledge of different material-associated processes, such as the residual degradation products of calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes—amongst other relevant parameters, such as material factors and their biological responses—is poor. New materials in this field are steadily being developed to surpass or extend the biofunctionality of previous materials or material classes. One of the most promising categories of materials are, for example, biodegradable metals (e.g., those based on magnesium) and, of course, the large class of 3D printable materials.

Developing and testing these future material classes poses new challenges to a variety of scientific disciplines such as materials science, biology and, of course, medicine, with its various specialties. In this context, interdisciplinary cooperation is indispensable for the success of new biomaterials and material classes, allowing us, as scientists, to build on the knowledge of existing materials for the successful development of new biomaterial classes.

The present Special Issue focuses on new findings about old and new biomaterials from various application areas, on the (bio-) functionality of new material, and on new developments in the field of biodegradable metals. Thus, we invite contributions of reviews and/or original papers reporting new results, including in vitro and in vivo analyses, as well as clinical studies, with a focus on new material, biological or medical insights.

Dr. Ole Jung
Prof. Dr. Steffen Emmert
Dr. Mike Barbeck
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • tissue regeneration
  • biomaterial degradation
  • cell and tissue responses

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 1355 KiB  
Article
Decellularized Wharton Jelly Implants Do Not Trigger Collagen and Cartilaginous Tissue Production in Tracheal Injury in Rabbits
by Katia Martins Foltz, Aloysio Enck Neto, Júlio César Francisco, Rossana Baggio Simeoni, Anna Flávia Ribeiro dos Santos Miggiolaro, Thatyanne Gradowski do Nascimento, Bassam Felipe Mogharbel, Katherine Athayde Teixeira de Carvalho, José Rocha Faria-Neto, Lúcia de Noronha and Luiz César Guarita-Souza
Life 2022, 12(7), 942; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12070942 - 23 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1411
Abstract
Background: Tracheal lesions are pathologies derived from the most diverse insults that can result in a fatal outcome. Despite the number of techniques designed for the treatment, a limiting factor is the extent of the extraction. Therefore, strategies with biomaterials can restructure tissues [...] Read more.
Background: Tracheal lesions are pathologies derived from the most diverse insults that can result in a fatal outcome. Despite the number of techniques designed for the treatment, a limiting factor is the extent of the extraction. Therefore, strategies with biomaterials can restructure tissues and maintain the organ’s functionality, like decellularized Wharton’s jelly (WJ) as a scaffold. The aim is to analyze the capacity of tracheal tissue regeneration after the implantation of decellularized WJ in rabbits submitted to a tracheal defect. Methods: An in vivo experimental study was undertaken using twenty rabbits separated into two groups (n = 10). Group 1 submitted to a tracheal defect, group 2 tracheal defect, and implantation of decellularized WJ. The analyses were performed 30 days after surgery through immunohistochemistry. Results: Inner tracheal area diameter (p = 0.643) didn’t show significance. Collagen type I, III, and Aggrecan highlighted no significant difference between the groups (both collagens with p = 0.445 and the Aggrecan p = 0.4). Conclusion: The scaffold appears to fit as a heterologous implant and did not trigger reactions such as rejection or extrusion of the material into the recipient. However, these results suggested that although the WJ matrix presents several characteristics as a biomaterial for tissue regeneration, it did not display histopathological benefits in trachea tissue regeneration. Full article
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Review

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28 pages, 3452 KiB  
Review
Bone Tissue Engineering through 3D Bioprinting of Bioceramic Scaffolds: A Review and Update
by Ahmad Taha Khalaf, Yuanyuan Wei, Jun Wan, Jiang Zhu, Yu Peng, Samiah Yasmin Abdul Kadir, Jamaludin Zainol, Zahraa Oglah, Lijia Cheng and Zheng Shi
Life 2022, 12(6), 903; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12060903 - 16 Jun 2022
Cited by 36 | Viewed by 4832
Abstract
Trauma and bone loss from infections, tumors, and congenital diseases make bone repair and regeneration the greatest challenges in orthopedic, craniofacial, and plastic surgeries. The shortage of donors, intrinsic limitations, and complications in transplantation have led to more focus and interest in regenerative [...] Read more.
Trauma and bone loss from infections, tumors, and congenital diseases make bone repair and regeneration the greatest challenges in orthopedic, craniofacial, and plastic surgeries. The shortage of donors, intrinsic limitations, and complications in transplantation have led to more focus and interest in regenerative medicine. Structures that closely mimic bone tissue can be produced by this unique technology. The steady development of three-dimensional (3D)-printed bone tissue engineering scaffold therapy has played an important role in achieving the desired goal. Bioceramic scaffolds are widely studied and appear to be the most promising solution. In addition, 3D printing technology can simulate mechanical and biological surface properties and print with high precision complex internal and external structures to match their functional properties. Inkjet, extrusion, and light-based 3D printing are among the rapidly advancing bone bioprinting technologies. Furthermore, stem cell therapy has recently shown an important role in this field, although large tissue defects are difficult to fill by injection alone. The combination of 3D-printed bone tissue engineering scaffolds with stem cells has shown very promising results. Therefore, biocompatible artificial tissue engineering with living cells is the key element required for clinical applications where there is a high demand for bone defect repair. Furthermore, the emergence of various advanced manufacturing technologies has made the form of biomaterials and their functions, composition, and structure more diversified, and manifold. The importance of this article lies in that it aims to briefly review the main principles and characteristics of the currently available methods in orthopedic bioprinting technology to prepare bioceramic scaffolds, and finally discuss the challenges and prospects for applications in this promising and vital field. Full article
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