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Inflammatory Tissue Reactions to Biomaterials

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 5896

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Ceramic Materials, Chair of Advanced Ceramic Materials, Institute for Materials Science and Technologies, Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Interests: bone substitutes; collagen-based biomaterials for soft and hard tissue regeneration; foreign body response to biomaterials; inflammation; macrophages, multinucleated giant cells, degradation processes of biomaterials; phagocytosis; vascularization; histology; immunohistochemistry; histomorphometry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The regulatory role of the immune system in maintaining tissue homeostasis and restoring its functionality, when disturbed due to trauma or injury, has become evident in recent years. The polarization of macrophages—one of the main constituents of the immune system—into the pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotype has great repercussions for cellular crosstalk, as well as the subsequent processes needed for proper tissue regeneration, such as angiogenesis. In certain scenarios, the damaged tissue requires the placement of both natural and synthetic biomaterials to facilitate the healing process. The immune response of the host organism to the biomaterial, which is of an exogenous nature, might determine its fate, leading either to active regeneration or its failure. Therefore, various strategies have been employed, such as the modification of structural/chemical features or the incorporation of bioactive molecules, to tune the interplay with the immune cells. Understanding how these particular modifications impact the polarization of macrophages and, further, heal cascades is of great interest in view of designing a new generation of osteoimmunomodulatory materials that support tissue regeneration.

Dr. Mike Barbeck
Dr. Ole Jung
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  •  Biomaterials
  •  Tissue regeneration
  •  Biomaterial degradation
  •  Biomaterial phagocytosis
  •  Cell and tissue responses
  •  (Biomaterial-related) inflammation
  •  Macrophages
  •  Multinucleated giant cells
  •  Granulocytes
  •  Vascularization
  •  Pro- and anti-inflammation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 1944 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Adverse Effects of Resorbable Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Determination of Macrophage Responses
by Wim H. De Jong, Danyel Jennen, Peter H. J. Keizers, Hennie M. Hodemaekers, Jolanda P. Vermeulen, Frank Bakker, Paul Schwillens, Marcel van Herwijnen, Marlon Jetten, Jos C. S. Kleinjans, Robert E. Geertsma and Rob J. Vandebriel
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(13), 7275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23137275 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1999
Abstract
Resorbable tissue fillers for aesthetic purposes can induce severe complications including product migration, late swelling, and inflammatory reactions. The relation between product characteristics and adverse effects is not well understood. We hypothesized that the degree of cross-linking hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers was associated [...] Read more.
Resorbable tissue fillers for aesthetic purposes can induce severe complications including product migration, late swelling, and inflammatory reactions. The relation between product characteristics and adverse effects is not well understood. We hypothesized that the degree of cross-linking hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers was associated with the occurrence of adverse effects. Five experimental HA preparations similar to HA fillers were synthesized with an increasing degree of cross-linking. Furthermore, a series of commercial fillers (Perfectha®) was obtained that differ in degradation time based on the size of their particulate HA components. Cytotoxic responses and cytokine production by human THP-1-derived macrophages exposed to extracts of the evaluated resorbable HA fillers were absent to minimal. Gene expression analysis of the HA-exposed macrophages revealed the responses related to cell cycle control and immune reactivity. Our results could not confirm the hypothesis that the level of cross-linking in our experimental HA fillers or the particulate size of commercial HA fillers is related to the induced biological responses. However, the evaluation of cytokine induction and gene expression in macrophages after biomaterial exposure presents promising opportunities for the development of methods to identify cellular processes that may be predictive for biomaterial-induced responses in patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Tissue Reactions to Biomaterials)
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22 pages, 8493 KiB  
Article
Biocompatibility Analyses of HF-Passivated Magnesium Screws for Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR)
by Ole Jung, Bernhard Hesse, Sanja Stojanovic, Christian Seim, Timm Weitkamp, Milijana Batinic, Oliver Goerke, Željka Perić Kačarević, Patrick Rider, Stevo Najman and Mike Barbeck
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(22), 12567; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222212567 - 22 Nov 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2869
Abstract
Background: Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most promising materials for human use in surgery due to material characteristics such as its elastic modulus as well as its resorbable and regenerative properties. In this study, HF-coated and uncoated novel bioresorbable magnesium fixation screws [...] Read more.
Background: Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most promising materials for human use in surgery due to material characteristics such as its elastic modulus as well as its resorbable and regenerative properties. In this study, HF-coated and uncoated novel bioresorbable magnesium fixation screws for maxillofacial and dental surgical applications were investigated in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the biocompatibility of the HF coating. Methods: Mg alloy screws that had either undergone a surface treatment with hydrofluoric-acid (HF) or left untreated were investigated. In vitro investigation included XTT, BrdU and LDH in accordance with the DIN ISO 10993-5/-12. In vivo, the screws were implanted into the tibia of rabbits. After 3 and 6 weeks, degradation, local tissue reactions and bony integration were analyzed histopathologically and histomorphometrically. Additionally, SEM/EDX analysis and synchrotron phase-contrast microtomography (µCT) measurements were conducted. The in vitro analyses revealed that the Mg screws are cytocompatible, with improved results when the surface had been passivated with HF. In vivo, the HF-treated Mg screws implanted showed a reduction in gas formation, slower biodegradation and a better bony integration in comparison to the untreated Mg screws. Histopathologically, the HF-passivated screws induced a layer of macrophages as part of its biodegradation process, whereas the untreated screws caused a slight fibrous tissue reaction. SEM/EDX analysis showed that both screws formed a similar layer of calcium phosphates on their surfaces and were surrounded by bone. Furthermore, the µCT revealed the presence of a metallic core of the screws, a faster absorbing corrosion front and a slow absorbing region of corroded magnesium. Conclusions: Overall, the HF-passivated Mg fixation screws showed significantly better biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo compared to the untreated screws. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Tissue Reactions to Biomaterials)
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