Multimodality Imaging in Current Cardiology

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Radiobiology and Nuclear Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2023) | Viewed by 9235

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Cardiology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria of Ferrara, Ferarra, Italy
Interests: cardiac imaging; cardiac magnetic resonance; cardiac computed tomogaphy; echocardiography
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the current era, multimodality imaging represents a key strategy for the diagnosis and management of several cardiovascular diseases. It includes especially non-invasive imaging techniques such as echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance. The integration of information derived from these different exams allows for an in-deep analysis of the disease and consequently the choice of the best management strategies for patients. Several cardiovascular diseases require multimodality imaging: valvular heart diseases, cardiomyopathies, ischemic heart disease, and congenital disorders. The target of this Special Issue is cardiologists and radiologists who deal with cardiac imaging but also clinicians who need to be confident with these new technologies.

Dr. Elisabetta Tonet
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • cardiac magnetic resonance
  • cardiac computed tomography
  • echocardiography
  • valvular heart disease
  • cardiomyopathy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 5614 KiB  
Article
Improving Chest Monitoring through Magnetic Resonance Angiogram Image Contrast Enhancement
by Beatrice Arvinti and Alexandru Isar
Life 2023, 13(11), 2160; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13112160 - 3 Nov 2023
Viewed by 642
Abstract
Magnetic resonance angiography is a medical procedure used to offer an image of the blood vessels and organs of the body. Given the worldwide spread of cardiovascular diseases, more and more resources are invested in treating them. One of the most modern treatments [...] Read more.
Magnetic resonance angiography is a medical procedure used to offer an image of the blood vessels and organs of the body. Given the worldwide spread of cardiovascular diseases, more and more resources are invested in treating them. One of the most modern treatments involves the acquisition of images of the heart. Sometimes the contrast of these images is not satisfactory. Injecting invasive enhancement substances to obtain a better view of the cardiac route is not advisable. However, software algorithms can solve the problem. This study proposes and tests a local adaptive contrast-adjustment algorithm using the dual-tree complex wavelet transform. The method has been tested with medical data from a public database to allow comparisons to other methods. The selected algorithm further improved the contrast of images. The performances are given for evaluation, both visually (to help doctors make accurate diagnoses) and in parametric form (to show engineers which parts of the algorithm might need improvement). Compared to other contrast enhancement methods, the proposed wavelet algorithm shows good results and greater stability. Thus, we aim to avoid future pointless complications due to unnecessary contrast substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodality Imaging in Current Cardiology)
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Review

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23 pages, 2046 KiB  
Review
Multimodality Cardiovascular Imaging of Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy
by Carla Contaldi, Vincenzo Montesarchio, Dario Catapano, Luigi Falco, Francesca Caputo, Carmine D’Aniello, Daniele Masarone and Giuseppe Pacileo
Life 2023, 13(10), 2103; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13102103 - 23 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1494
Abstract
Cancer therapies have revolutionized patient survival rates, yet they come with the risk of cardiotoxicity, necessitating effective monitoring and management. The existing guidelines offer a limited empirical basis for practical approaches in various clinical scenarios. This article explores the intricate relationship between cancer [...] Read more.
Cancer therapies have revolutionized patient survival rates, yet they come with the risk of cardiotoxicity, necessitating effective monitoring and management. The existing guidelines offer a limited empirical basis for practical approaches in various clinical scenarios. This article explores the intricate relationship between cancer therapy and the cardiovascular system, highlighting the role of advanced multimodality imaging in monitoring patients before, during, and after cancer treatment. This review outlines the cardiovascular effects of different cancer therapy classes, offering a comprehensive understanding of their dose- and time-dependent impacts. This paper delves into diverse imaging modalities such as echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac computed tomography, and nuclear imaging, detailing their strengths and limitations in various conditions due to cancer treatment, such as cardiac dysfunction, myocarditis, coronary artery disease, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypertension, valvular heart diseases, and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, it underscores the significance of long-term follow-up for cancer survivors and discusses future directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodality Imaging in Current Cardiology)
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12 pages, 1922 KiB  
Review
CMR and Percutaneous Treatment of Pulmonary Regurgitation: Outreach the Search for the Best Candidate
by Francesca Baessato, Peter Ewert and Christian Meierhofer
Life 2023, 13(5), 1127; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13051127 - 4 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1469
Abstract
Performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the planning phase of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) is needed for the accurate delineation of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), coronary anatomy and the quantification of right ventricular (RV) volume overload in patients with [...] Read more.
Performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the planning phase of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) is needed for the accurate delineation of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), coronary anatomy and the quantification of right ventricular (RV) volume overload in patients with significant pulmonary regurgitation (PR). This helps to find the correct timings for the intervention and prevention of PPVI-related complications such as coronary artery compression, device embolization and stent fractures. A defined CMR study protocol should be set for all PPVI candidates to reduce acquisition times and acquire essential sequences that are determinants for PPVI success. For correct RVOT sizing, contrast-free whole-heart sequences, preferably at end-systole, should be adopted in the pediatric population thanks to their high reproducibility and concordance with invasive angiographic data. When CMR is not feasible or contraindicated, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) may be performed for high-resolution cardiac imaging and eventually the acquisition of complementary functional data. The aim of this review is to underline the role of CMR and advanced multimodality imaging in the context of pre-procedural planning of PPVI concerning its current and potential future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodality Imaging in Current Cardiology)
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13 pages, 1723 KiB  
Review
The Use of Multimodality Imaging for the Diagnosis of Myocardial Outpouchings and Invaginations: A Systematic Review
by Rita Pavasini, Nicola Bianchi, Federica Frascaro, Federico Marchini, Sofia Meossi, Luca Zanarelli, Federico Sanguettoli, Alberto Cossu, Elisabetta Tonet, Giulia Passarini and Gianluca Campo
Life 2023, 13(3), 650; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13030650 - 26 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1850
Abstract
Cardiac ventricular outpouchings and invaginations are rare structural abnormalities and usually incidental findings during cardiac imaging. A definitive diagnosis is possible through the use of multimodality imaging. A systematic review of the literature was carried out in November 2022 to identify studies regarding [...] Read more.
Cardiac ventricular outpouchings and invaginations are rare structural abnormalities and usually incidental findings during cardiac imaging. A definitive diagnosis is possible through the use of multimodality imaging. A systematic review of the literature was carried out in November 2022 to identify studies regarding ventricular outpouchings and invaginations. The main aim of the review is to summarize knowledge regarding epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and prognosis of patients with ventricular outpouchings (aneurisms or diverticula) and invaginations (crypts and recesses). Overall, 26 studies published between 2000 and 2020 were included in the review. Diverticula and congenital aneurysms incidence ranges between 0.6 and 4.1%. Myocardial recesses and crypts range between 9% in the general population and up to 25% in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The combined use of echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is useful to establish tissue contractility, fibrosis, extension and relationship with adjacent structures for differential diagnosis of both invaginations and outpouchings. In conclusion, both outpouchings and invaginations are rare entities: a definitive diagnosis may be aided by the use of combining multiple imaging techniques, and the treatment depends both on the lesion-specific risk of complications and on the potential association of some lesions with cardiomyopathy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodality Imaging in Current Cardiology)
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14 pages, 4742 KiB  
Review
Artificial Intelligence in Cardiovascular CT and MR Imaging
by Ludovica R. M. Lanzafame, Giuseppe M. Bucolo, Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Sandro Sironi, Michele Gaeta, Giorgio Ascenti, Christian Booz, Thomas J. Vogl, Alfredo Blandino, Silvio Mazziotti and Tommaso D’Angelo
Life 2023, 13(2), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13020507 - 11 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3173
Abstract
The technological development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has grown rapidly in recent years. The applications of AI to cardiovascular imaging are various and could improve the radiologists’ workflow, speeding up acquisition and post-processing time, increasing image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Several studies have [...] Read more.
The technological development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has grown rapidly in recent years. The applications of AI to cardiovascular imaging are various and could improve the radiologists’ workflow, speeding up acquisition and post-processing time, increasing image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Several studies have already proved AI applications in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance, including automatic evaluation of calcium score, quantification of coronary stenosis and plaque analysis, or the automatic quantification of heart volumes and myocardial tissue characterization. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest advances in the field of AI applied to cardiovascular CT and MR imaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodality Imaging in Current Cardiology)
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