Vascular Disease: Etiologic, Diagnostic, Prognostic and Therapeutic Research—2nd Edition

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 2444

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Internal Medicine Department, Medical Clinic no. 1, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 400000 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
2. County Emergency Hospital Cluj-Napoca, 400000 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: vascular medicine; atherothrombosis; cardiology
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Guest Editor
Department and Clinic of Internal Medicine, Angiology, and Physical Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Batorego 15 St., 41-902 Bytom, Poland
Interests: physical medicine; thermal imaging; cryotherapy; cryogenic temperatures; vascular medicine; oxidative stress; rehabilitation; internal medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editors are grateful to the many researchers who contributed to the success of the first volume of this Special Issue (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/life/special_issues/vascular_etiology_diagnosis_threapy_prognosis). We are very pleased to now announce the second volume of our Special Issue.

Vascular diseases have an increasing morbidity and mortality impact, as they are related to population aging, socio-economic factors or increasing prevalence of risk factors, such as diabetes. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to vascular complications, both at the arterial and venous sites. Vascular medicine is not just a field of intense medical research, having also become a distinct medical specialty or subspecialty in many countries. Vascular diseases involve peripheral arteries and veins, aorta and visceral abdominal vessels and cervical vessels, such as carotids and vertebral arteries. Cardiac and cerebral complications are often related to vascular diseases. Coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries have common atherothrombotic etiology and share many clinical diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic relationships. Microcirculation is a field of increasing fundamental and clinical research interest, both for arterial and venous diseases. The research field in vascular diseases and medicine is broad and opened to contributions from fundamental (genetics, haemostasis, biochemistry, etc.) and clinical medicine. Diagnosis and therapy of vascular diseases are performed by medical, surgical and interventional procedures and specialists. The scope of this Special Issue covers specific arterial and venous diseases, their specific impact on organ diseases and the relationships between vascular diseases at multiple sites. New drugs are developed to control risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, etc.) or for antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, with a significantly beneficial prognostic impact. Surgical revascularization at different arterial sites improves morbidity and mortality. Interventional procedures gain ground on both arterial and venous sites and have been proven safe and effective. The aim of this Special Issue is to offer an overview of the richness of vascular fundamental and clinical medicine, covering all aspects of etiologic, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic research.

Prof. Dr. Dan Mircea Olinic
Prof. Dr. Agata Stanek
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • vascular diseases
  • etiology
  • diagnosis
  • prognosis
  • therapy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 773 KiB  
Article
The Protective Effect of the Crosstalk between Zinc Hair Concentration and Lymphocyte Count—Preliminary Report
by Tomasz Urbanowicz, Anetta Hanć, Jolanta Tomczak, Michał Michalak, Anna Olasińska-Wiśniewska, Patrycja Rzesoś, Mateusz Szot, Krzysztof J. Filipiak, Beata Krasińska, Zbigniew Krasiński, Andrzej Tykarski and Marek Jemielity
Life 2024, 14(5), 571; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14050571 - 29 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: An imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mechanisms is indicated in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic plaque. The coronary artery and carotid disease, despite sharing similar risk factors, are developed separately. The aim of this study was to analyze possible mechanisms between trace element [...] Read more.
Background: An imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mechanisms is indicated in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic plaque. The coronary artery and carotid disease, despite sharing similar risk factors, are developed separately. The aim of this study was to analyze possible mechanisms between trace element hair–scalp concentrations and whole blood counts that favor atherosclerotic plaque progression in certain locations. Methods: There were 65 (36 (55%) males and 29 (45%) females) patients with a median age of 68 (61–73) years enrolled in a prospective, preliminary, multicenter analysis. The study group was composed of 13 patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD group) referred for surgical revascularization due to multivessel coronary disease, 34 patients with carotid artery disease (carotid group) admitted for vascular procedure, and 18 patients in a control group (control group). Results: There was a significant difference between the CAD and carotid groups regarding lymphocyte (p = 0.004) counts. The biochemical comparison between the coronary and carotid groups revealed significant differences regarding chromium (Cr) (p = 0.002), copper (Cu) (p < 0.001), and zinc (Zn) (p < 0.001) concentrations. Spearman Rank Order Correlations between lymphocyte counts and trace elements in the analyzed groups were performed, revealing a strong correlation with zinc (R = 0.733, p < 0.001) in the control group (non-CAD, non-carotid). Conclusion: Significant differences in hair–scalp concentrations related to atherosclerosis location were observed in our analysis. The interplay between zinc concentration and lymphocyte count may play a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease development. Full article
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12 pages, 920 KiB  
Article
ADAMTS13, von Willebrand Factor, Platelet Microparticles, Factor VIII, and Impact of Somatic Mutations in the Pathogenesis of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis Associated with BCR-ABL-Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms
by Roberto Castelli, Alessandra Berzuini, Roberto Manetti, Alessandro Palmerio Delitala, Dante Castro, Giuseppe Sanna, Marta Chiara Sircana, Nicia Isabella Profili, Arianna Bartoli, Leyla La Cava, Giorgio Lambertenghi Deliliers, Mattia Donadoni and Antonio Gidaro
Life 2024, 14(4), 486; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14040486 - 9 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are often associated with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). Not all the factors involved in the thrombotic tendency are currently known. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate a possible association between ADAMTS13, von Willebrand factor (VWF), platelet microvesicles (MV), and [...] Read more.
Background: Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are often associated with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). Not all the factors involved in the thrombotic tendency are currently known. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate a possible association between ADAMTS13, von Willebrand factor (VWF), platelet microvesicles (MV), and factor VIII activity (FVIII:C) with thrombotic events in MPN patients. Materials and methods: In total, 36 consecutive MPN patients with SVT were enrolled. The MPNs were diagnosed based on clinical characteristics and one or more gene mutations among JAK-2, CALR, and MPL. As controls, 50 randomly selected patients with MPN without thrombosis, 50 patients with deep vein thrombosis without MPNs, and 50 healthy blood donors were evaluated. Complete blood count, ADAMTS13, VWF, MV, and FVIII:C in plasma were measured in all the subjects. Results: The JAK-2 mutation was found in 94% of the patients with SVT, but none were triple-negative for genetic mutations (JAK2 V617F, CALR, MPL, and exon 12). Compared to the normal subjects, in all the MPN patients (with or without SVT), the levels of ADAMTS13 were found to be significantly lower (p < 0.001) and the MV concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.001). Among the MPN patients, the VWF and FVIII:C levels were significantly higher in the patients with SVT than those without thrombosis (p = 0.007 and p = 0.04, respectively). Splenomegaly was present in 78% of MPN patients with SVT and in 30% of those without SVT (p < 0.001). The ADAMTS13/VWF ratio was reduced in all the patients, but not in the healthy blood donors (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The significant increase in circulating MV, VWF, and FVIII:C in the MPN patients and in the patients with thrombosis supports the role of endothelium damage in promoting thrombotic events. In particular, a significant increase in VWF and FVIII:C levels was found in the MPN patients with SVT. Full article
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Review

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13 pages, 2802 KiB  
Review
Peripheral Artery Disease Ultrasound Assessment in Predicting the Severity of Coronary Artery Disease
by Maria Olinic, Florin-Leontin Lazar, Horea-Laurentiu Onea, Calin Homorodean, Mihai Ober, Dan Tataru, Mihail Spinu, Alexandru Achim and Dan-Mircea Olinic
Life 2024, 14(3), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14030333 - 1 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Atherosclerosis in a progressive disease that is systemic in nature, and hence the simultaneous presentation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) is not uncommon. As clinically manifested PAD is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes, the timely identification of subclinical [...] Read more.
Atherosclerosis in a progressive disease that is systemic in nature, and hence the simultaneous presentation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) is not uncommon. As clinically manifested PAD is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes, the timely identification of subclinical atherosclerosis seems of utmost importance. Ultrasonography (US) is an ideal imaging modality for assessing PAD that is easy to use, accurate, widely available and avoids unnecessary exposure to radiation. Several US parameters have been proposed in the assessment of PAD, with varying prognostic usefulness, depending on disease location. The aim of this review is to summarize the most important evidence available on the association between US-detected atherosclerosis in different vascular sites and the presence and severity of CAD, as well as the impact of the early detection of PAD on the outcomes of patients presenting with CAD. Full article
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