Advances in Ship and Marine Hydrodynamics

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 7664

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: hull form optimization; hydrodynamic performance (resistance, manoeuvring, seakeeping); biomimetic methods in ship optimization; experimental methods in ship hydrodynamics; economic operation of ships and fleets; hydrodynamics of high-speed craft
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The hydrodynamics of the marine environment, and especially the hydrodynamics of its interaction with ships and floating structures, is a scientific area stimulating the interest of both theoretical investigators attempting to develop analytical methods to solve difficult physical and mathematical problems and advanced engineers who implement cumbersome numerical methods to come up to a realistic solution. In both cases, the assumptions and the simplifications imposed on the original problems are critical for the reliability of the results, restricting the applicability of the proposed methodologies to specific types of ships or floating structures. Furthermore, complicated models or full-scale tests are extensively used to verify the applicability of the proposed techniques. Hydrodynamic topics are directly associated with the overall performance of ships and floating structures in calm and rough waters which directly affects their economic operation. Critical operational aspects, such as speed, power requirements and greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions depend heavily on the hydrodynamic characteristics of ships with respect to resistance, propulsion, seakeeping and maneuvering. Specific problems are encountered in the study of the hydrodynamics of high-speed craft. On the other hand, the seakeeping behavior of floating platforms is a major aspect of their design. The reliable and robust assessment of the performance of ships and floating structures in waves offers the opportunity to further improve it using biomimetic or other modern optimization methods.

High-quality papers are encouraged for publication which are directly related to various aspects, as mentioned below. Novel techniques on the topic will be highly appreciated, and are encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Gregory Grigoropoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrodynamics
  • ships
  • floating structures
  • optimization
  • seakeeping
  • resistance
  • propulsion
  • maneuvering
  • high-speed craft
  • case studies

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 5935 KiB  
Article
Numerical Prediction of Ship Resistance Based on Volume of Fluid Implicit Multi-Step Method
by Yu Wang, Honghua Rao, Zhengyuan Liu, Kaihua Liu, Bo Zhou and Guiyong Zhang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(11), 2181; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11112181 - 16 Nov 2023
Viewed by 802
Abstract
The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is used in two-phase fluid flow problems of ship hydrodynamic calculations, to capture the motion and distribution of the gas–liquid free surface. To ensure solution stability and accuracy, numerical simulations typically require separate mesh refinement for the [...] Read more.
The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is used in two-phase fluid flow problems of ship hydrodynamic calculations, to capture the motion and distribution of the gas–liquid free surface. To ensure solution stability and accuracy, numerical simulations typically require separate mesh refinement for the free surface or a reduced time step, resulting in a significant increase in solution time. This study aims to compare the drag and vessel attitude change calculations of the VOF implicit multi-step method with the traditional single-step method, and to verify the feasibility of the method in the numerical prediction of ship resistance and flow field analysis. The results show that an implicit multi-step method with a reasonable number of internal iterations could obtain results close to those of the single-step method with a reduced time step, and the error in trim angle was relatively large, about 2%, but the solving time was only about half that of the latter. The method could also capture the shape and location of waves on the hull, especially in the vicinity of the ship, while the distribution of the waves in the far field differed from those in the experiments to some extent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ship and Marine Hydrodynamics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 3759 KiB  
Article
The Effect of a Linear Free Surface Boundary Condition on the Steady-State Wave-Making of Shallowly Submerged Underwater Vehicles
by William Lambert, Stefano Brizzolara and Craig Woolsey
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(5), 981; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11050981 - 05 May 2023
Viewed by 1246
Abstract
Near-surface simulation methods for shallowly submerged underwater vehicles are necessary for the population of a variety of free-surface-affected, coefficient-based maneuvering and seakeeping models. Simulations vary in complexity and computational costs, often sacrificing accuracy for simplicity and speed. One particular simplifying assumption, the linearization [...] Read more.
Near-surface simulation methods for shallowly submerged underwater vehicles are necessary for the population of a variety of free-surface-affected, coefficient-based maneuvering and seakeeping models. Simulations vary in complexity and computational costs, often sacrificing accuracy for simplicity and speed. One particular simplifying assumption, the linearization of the free surface boundary conditions, is explored in this study by comparing the steady-state wave-making characteristics of a shallowly submerged prolate spheroid using two different simulation methods at several submergence depths and forward speeds. Hydrodynamic responses are compared between a time-domain boundary element method that makes use of a linearized free surface boundary condition and an inviscid, volume of fluid Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes computational fluid dynamics code that imposes no explicit free surface boundary condition. Differences of up to 22.6%, 32.5%, and 33.3% are found in the prediction of steady state surge force, heave force, and pitch moment, respectively. The largest differences between the two simulation methods arise for motions occurring at small submergences and large wave-making velocities where linear free-surface assumptions become less valid. Nonlinearities that occur in such cases are revealed through physical artifacts such as wave steepening, wave breaking, and high-energy waves. A further examination of near-surface viscous forces reveals that the viscous drag on the vessel is depth dependent due to the changing velocity profile around the body. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ship and Marine Hydrodynamics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 12945 KiB  
Article
Hydrodynamic Shape Design and Self-Propulsion Analysis of a Hybrid-Driven AUG
by Chen-Wei Chen, Zhao-Ye Zhou, Xu-Peng Chen and Xiao-Jing Zhou
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(4), 886; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11040886 - 21 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1351
Abstract
Due to the lack of a powerful propulsion device in conventional autonomous underwater gliders (AUGs), their mobility and flexibility are insufficient, thus not being capable of also ensuring the stability of the motion route. Thus, it is necessary to further develop hybrid-driven AUGs. [...] Read more.
Due to the lack of a powerful propulsion device in conventional autonomous underwater gliders (AUGs), their mobility and flexibility are insufficient, thus not being capable of also ensuring the stability of the motion route. Thus, it is necessary to further develop hybrid-driven AUGs. This paper applied CFD simulation and experimental analysis methods to study and design a hybrid-driven AUG with a propeller optimized from a type of AUG with swept-forward and swept-back wings. Through parameter adjustment, the hydrodynamic configuration was optimized, and the optimal hull design and hydrofoil type selection were proposed. The lift–drag ratio could be improved by up to 22.5% at an angle of attack of 8 degrees. The optimized AUG was combined with a single propeller for self-propulsion simulation. Aiming at the problem caused by the propeller torque on the AUG, the strategy of a contra-rotating propeller (CRP) was conducted to self-eliminate the propeller torque. The simulation results show that in the self-propulsion state, the torque of the contra-rotating propeller could be reduced by more than 92% compared with that of a single propeller, greatly reducing the impact on the hybrid-driven AUG and raising the navigation stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ship and Marine Hydrodynamics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

29 pages, 23244 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Mooring Effects of Future Ultra-Large Container Vessels (ULCV) on Port Infrastructures
by Sara Sanz Sáenz, Gabriel Diaz-Hernandez, Lutz Schweter and Pieter Nordbeck
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(4), 856; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11040856 - 18 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1591
Abstract
The size of container vessels is continuously growing, always exceeding expectations. Port authorities and terminals need to constantly adapt and face challenges related to maritime infrastructure, equipment, and operations, as these are the principal areas affected by the future Ultra Large Container Vessels [...] Read more.
The size of container vessels is continuously growing, always exceeding expectations. Port authorities and terminals need to constantly adapt and face challenges related to maritime infrastructure, equipment, and operations, as these are the principal areas affected by the future Ultra Large Container Vessels (ULCVs). Maneuvring areas are at their limits, and mooring equipment is at an increased risk of being overloaded. This study aims to analyze the limitations that present mooring systems may face when ULCVs are subjected to wind and passing-ship forces exerted by a future ULCV and wind forces through Dynamic Mooring Analysis (DMA). A hypothetical and massive future ULCV with a capacity of 40,000 TEU is compared to the Emma Maersk, which is a present vessel that regularly calls at container terminals. The Emma Maersk, with its current mooring arrangement, experiences higher motion than future ULCVs, which experience higher forces but are also moored with more and stronger lines. This translates into considerably higher loads in the mooring system, potentially compromising safe mooring conditions at the terminal. Mitigating measures are proposed in the study to face these limitations. In addition, the study explores the potential of new and innovative mooring technologies, such as high-strength synthetic ropes and smart mooring systems, to address the challenges posed by ULCVs. A container terminal at the Port of Rotterdam, Europe’s largest sea port, has been analyzed as a case study. The terminal is located next to a busy fairway that leads to other container terminals, justifying the need to analyze both wind and passing-ship effects on moored ships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ship and Marine Hydrodynamics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 7753 KiB  
Article
Numerical Analysis of Propeller-Induced Hydrodynamic Interaction between Ships
by Xueqian Zhou, Cong Liu, Huilong Ren and Chen Xu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(3), 537; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11030537 - 01 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1207
Abstract
The hydrodynamic interaction effects between ships are significantly pronounced in restricted waters, and this may potentially threaten the safety of ships, especially given that ship dimensions and waterway traffic have kept increasing. Although there has been a good amount of research on ship [...] Read more.
The hydrodynamic interaction effects between ships are significantly pronounced in restricted waters, and this may potentially threaten the safety of ships, especially given that ship dimensions and waterway traffic have kept increasing. Although there has been a good amount of research on ship hydrodynamic interactions, the study of the effect of the propeller on the ship’s hydrodynamic interaction is very limited. In this paper, a series of RANSE-based numerical simulations are carried out to study the characteristics of the propeller in near-field interaction between ships without speed. The hydrodynamic forces and moment acting on the ship are calculated and analyzed. Through the analysis of the characteristics of the flow field and the behavioral pattern of the hydrodynamic forces, it is found that the propeller has a significant influence on the pressure distribution on the hull as well as on the hydrodynamic interaction forces. The maximum lateral force acting on the interacting ship could reach 0.58 times the standard thrust of a KP458 propeller (the revolution is 594 rpm and the velocity coefficient is 0.25 in open water). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ship and Marine Hydrodynamics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop