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Molecular Genetics and Plant Breeding 4.0

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1942

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a continuation of our previous successful Special Issue “Molecular Genetics and Plant Breeding 3.0”.

Plant breeding is a historical academic discipline which laid the foundations of modern agriculture. The principles of classical breeding are still the nucleus of modern breeding science and industry. On the other hand, recent methodological advancements in genomics, biotechnology, molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revolutionized the area of plant breeding and its linkages with related disciplines. These developments have opened new interdisciplinary areas of plant breeding with quantitative genetics, genomics, agro-biotechnology, and bioinformatics.

This Special Issue will focus on innovative research on the exploration and utilization of crop biodiversity for improving essential breeding traits using molecular techniques and to replenish the genetic potential of the cultivated gene pool for yield and sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Hai Du
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • crop biodiversity
  • wild accessions
  • molecular breeding
  • QTL and gene mapping
  • comparative genomics
  • drought stress adaptation
  • disease resistance
  • yield and sustainability
  • GWAS mapping
  • predictive breeding
  • genomic prediction

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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24 pages, 4209 KiB  
Article
New Insights into the Genetic Basis of Lysine Accumulation in Rice Revealed by Multi-Model GWAS
by Liqiang He, Yao Sui, Yanru Che, Lihua Liu, Shuo Liu, Xiaobing Wang and Guangping Cao
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(9), 4667; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25094667 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 408
Abstract
Lysine is an essential amino acid that cannot be synthesized in humans. Rice is a global staple food for humans but has a rather low lysine content. Identification of the quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs) and genes underlying lysine content is crucial to increase [...] Read more.
Lysine is an essential amino acid that cannot be synthesized in humans. Rice is a global staple food for humans but has a rather low lysine content. Identification of the quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs) and genes underlying lysine content is crucial to increase lysine accumulation. In this study, five grain and three leaf lysine content datasets and 4,630,367 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 387 rice accessions were used to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) by ten statistical models. A total of 248 and 71 common QTNs associated with grain/leaf lysine content were identified. The accuracy of genomic selection/prediction RR-BLUP models was up to 0.85, and the significant correlation between the number of favorable alleles per accession and lysine content was up to 0.71, which validated the reliability and additive effects of these QTNs. Several key genes were uncovered for fine-tuning lysine accumulation. Additionally, 20 and 30 QTN-by-environment interactions (QEIs) were detected in grains/leaves. The QEI-sf0111954416 candidate gene LOC_Os01g21380 putatively accounted for gene-by-environment interaction was identified in grains. These findings suggested the application of multi-model GWAS facilitates a better understanding of lysine accumulation in rice. The identified QTNs and genes hold the potential for lysine-rich rice with a normal phenotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Genetics and Plant Breeding 4.0)
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22 pages, 6486 KiB  
Article
Transcriptome Analysis of White- and Red-Fleshed Apple Fruits Uncovered Novel Genes Related to the Regulation of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis
by Sylwia Keller-Przybylkowicz, Michal Oskiera, Xueqing Liu, Laiqing Song, Lingling Zhao, Xiaoyun Du, Dorota Kruczynska, Agnieszka Walencik, Norbert Kowara and Grzegorz Bartoszewski
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(3), 1778; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25031778 - 1 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 885
Abstract
The red flesh coloration of apples is a result of a biochemical pathway involved in the biosynthesis of anthocyanins and anthocyanidins. Based on apple genome analysis, a high number of regulatory genes, mainly transcription factors such as MYB, which are components of regulatory [...] Read more.
The red flesh coloration of apples is a result of a biochemical pathway involved in the biosynthesis of anthocyanins and anthocyanidins. Based on apple genome analysis, a high number of regulatory genes, mainly transcription factors such as MYB, which are components of regulatory complex MYB-bHLH-WD40, and several structural genes (PAL, 4CL, CHS, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS, UFGT) involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis, have been identified. In this study, we investigated novel genes related to the red-flesh apple phenotype. These genes could be deemed molecular markers for the early selection of new apple cultivars. Based on a comparative transcriptome analysis of apples with different fruit-flesh coloration, we successfully identified and characterized ten potential genes from the plant hormone transduction pathway of auxin (GH3); cytokinins (B-ARR); gibberellins (DELLA); abscisic acid (SnRK2 and ABF); brassinosteroids (BRI1, BZR1 and TCH4); jasmonic acid (MYC2); and salicylic acid (NPR1). An analysis of expression profiles was performed in immature and ripe fruits of red-fleshed cultivars. We have uncovered genes mediating the regulation of abscisic acid, salicylic acid, cytokinin, and jasmonic acid signaling and described their role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, accumulation, and degradation. The presented results underline the relationship between genes from the hormone signal transduction pathway and UFGT genes, which are directly responsible for anthocyanin color transformation as well as anthocyanin accumulation during apple-fruit ripening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Genetics and Plant Breeding 4.0)
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Review

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22 pages, 1572 KiB  
Review
Advances in the Modulation of Potato Tuber Dormancy and Sprouting
by Xueni Di, Qiang Wang, Feng Zhang, Haojie Feng, Xiyao Wang and Chengcheng Cai
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(10), 5078; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25105078 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 325
Abstract
The post-harvest phase of potato tuber dormancy and sprouting are essential in determining the economic value. The intricate transition from dormancy to active growth is influenced by multiple factors, including environmental factors, carbohydrate metabolism, and hormonal regulation. Well-established environmental factors such as temperature, [...] Read more.
The post-harvest phase of potato tuber dormancy and sprouting are essential in determining the economic value. The intricate transition from dormancy to active growth is influenced by multiple factors, including environmental factors, carbohydrate metabolism, and hormonal regulation. Well-established environmental factors such as temperature, humidity, and light play pivotal roles in these processes. However, recent research has expanded our understanding to encompass other novel influences such as magnetic fields, cold plasma treatment, and UV-C irradiation. Hormones like abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellic acid (GA), cytokinins (CK), auxin, and ethylene (ETH) act as crucial messengers, while brassinosteroids (BRs) have emerged as key modulators of potato tuber sprouting. In addition, jasmonates (JAs), strigolactones (SLs), and salicylic acid (SA) also regulate potato dormancy and sprouting. This review article delves into the intricate study of potato dormancy and sprouting, emphasizing the impact of environmental conditions, carbohydrate metabolism, and hormonal regulation. It explores how various environmental factors affect dormancy and sprouting processes. Additionally, it highlights the role of carbohydrates in potato tuber sprouting and the intricate hormonal interplay, particularly the role of BRs. This review underscores the complexity of these interactions and their importance in optimizing potato dormancy and sprouting for agricultural practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Genetics and Plant Breeding 4.0)
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