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Ovarian Disorders: From Molecular Basis to Therapeutic Advances

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 3868

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb, Petrova 13, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: minimally invasive surgery; endometriosis; adenomyosis
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Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, “Filippo Del Ponte” Hospital, University of Insubria, 21100 Varese, VA, Italy
Interests: women’s health; minimally invasive procedures; up-to-date management; gynecology; reproductive health; surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Most ovarian disorders are benign, with the majority being functional ovarian cysts and benign neoplasms, including endometriosis and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Although these are very frequent findings in general gynecology, there is an insufficient amount of evidence about molecular pathophysiology and subsequent therapeutic advances.

This Special Issue aims to focus on basic and translational research, as well as molecular and hormonal evidence of the pathophysiology of various ovarian disorders that are related to fertility and/or metabolic/endocrine conditions. Original research articles as well as narrative and systematic reviews, including perspectives, are encouraged to improve our overall knowledge about the molecular basis of and therapeutic advances in ovarian disorders.

Dr. Mislav Mikuš
Dr. Antonio Simone Laganà
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polycystic ovary syndrome
  • ovarian steroidogenesis
  • adipose tissue steroidogenesis
  • excess androgen synthesis
  • insulin resistance
  • theca cell dysfunction
  • chronic inflammation
  • insulin sensitizing agents

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

9 pages, 1024 KiB  
Review
CTLA4-Linked Autoimmunity in the Pathogenesis of Endometriosis and Related Infertility: A Systematic Review
by Mislav Mikuš, Marina Šprem Goldštajn, Ivan Brlečić, Stipe Dumančić, Antonio Simone Laganà, Vito Chiantera, Goran Vujić and Mario Ćorić
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(18), 10902; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms231810902 - 18 Sep 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2963
Abstract
Several studies, although with conflicting results, have sought to determine the concentration of soluble CTLA4 antigens in peripheral blood plasma and peritoneal fluid in patients with endometriosis-related infertility. A systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and [...] Read more.
Several studies, although with conflicting results, have sought to determine the concentration of soluble CTLA4 antigens in peripheral blood plasma and peritoneal fluid in patients with endometriosis-related infertility. A systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) through a search of the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, The Cochrane Library, Health Technology Assessment Database and Web of Science, and Clinical Trials research register. We included observational or prospective human and animal studies with any features related to endometriosis and/or infertility studies involving CTLA4-related pathogenesis published in English. The results of studies in which the size and characteristics of the observed groups were not stated were excluded. From the initial pool of 73 publications identified and screened, we finally included 5 articles to summarize the most recent knowledge about CTLA4-linked autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of endometriosis and related infertility. Evidence from clinical studies shows that CTLA4-based autoimmunity is involved in the maintenance of chronic inflammation in the peritoneal environment, with pre-clinical evidence of anti-CTLA antibodies as a potential novel target therapy for endometriosis. However, CTLA4 gene analyses do not support findings of CTLA4-linked autoimmunity as a primary determinant of the pathogenesis of endometriosis. These findings underlie the role of complex interactions within the family of immune checkpoint molecules involved. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical relevance of anti-CTLA target therapy, taking into account the potential adverse events and repercussions of novel immunologic therapy modalities. However, with the general scarcity of studies investigating this topic, the clinical importance of CTLA4 autoimmunity still remains unclear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Disorders: From Molecular Basis to Therapeutic Advances)
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