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Molecular Advance in Abiotic Stress Signaling in Plants: Focus on Atmospheric Stressors

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 4158

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Biology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: molecular, biochemical, and physiological mechanisms of plant responses to pathogens and pests especially reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants; sugars as signaling molecules; regulation of proteolysis and nitrogen metabolism; additional research topics concern the plant abiotic stress especially metallic trace elements and mechanisms of combined stresses
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant’s reactions to abiotic stresses are extraordinarily complex. They take place at various levels of plant organization, starting from changes in biochemical processes, such as respiration, photosynthesis, and transpiration, and ending during morphological and anatomical changes in plants’ organs. However, these above-mentioned changes are preceded by the activation of efficient molecular signaling machinery, which ensures that plants tune in to external abiotic stimuli.

This Special Issue requests original and review papers concerning hormonal and sugar signaling, reactive oxygen–nitrogen–sulfur species interactions, cascades of kinases, transcription factors, and changes in gene expression and gene expression regulation in response to abiotic stresses operating separately, simultaneously or sequentially. We invite publications in the fields of cold, heat, frost, cold wave, heat wave, air quality and pollution, UV radiation, light quality, and other atmospheric factors. Submitted manuscripts must look at clear abiotic stress signaling aspects at the molecular level, which should be reflected not only in the presented results, but also in their discussions. We also encourage the submission of manuscripts from the developing discipline of molecular biology, namely interactomics describing molecular interactions between molecules belonging to different biochemical groups (proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates) and within a given group.

We also encourage you to familiarize yourself with the related Special Issue which we focus on "Molecular Advance in Abiotic Stress Signaling in Plants: Focus on Edaphic Stressors".

Dr. Mateusz Labudda
Prof. Dr. Philippe Jeandet
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • abiotic stress
  • interactomics
  • gene expression regulation
  • kinases
  • oxidative stress
  • phytohormones
  • signaling, sugar sensing and signaling
  • transcription factors

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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25 pages, 4853 KiB  
Article
Physiological and Proteomic Responses of the Tetraploid Robinia pseudoacacia L. to High CO2 Levels
by Jianxin Li, Subin Zhang, Pei Lei, Liyong Guo, Xiyang Zhao and Fanjuan Meng
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(10), 5262; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25105262 - 11 May 2024
Viewed by 355
Abstract
The increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is a significant factor in triggering global warming. CO2 is essential for plant photosynthesis, but excessive CO2 can negatively impact photosynthesis and its associated physiological and biochemical processes. The tetraploid Robinia pseudoacacia L., a [...] Read more.
The increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is a significant factor in triggering global warming. CO2 is essential for plant photosynthesis, but excessive CO2 can negatively impact photosynthesis and its associated physiological and biochemical processes. The tetraploid Robinia pseudoacacia L., a superior and improved variety, exhibits high tolerance to abiotic stress. In this study, we investigated the physiological and proteomic response mechanisms of the tetraploid R. pseudoacacia under high CO2 treatment. The results of our physiological and biochemical analyses revealed that a 5% high concentration of CO2 hindered the growth and development of the tetraploid R. pseudoacacia and caused severe damage to the leaves. Additionally, it significantly reduced photosynthetic parameters such as Pn, Gs, Tr, and Ci, as well as respiration. The levels of chlorophyll (Chl a and b) and the fluorescent parameters of chlorophyll (Fm, Fv/Fm, qP, and ETR) also significantly decreased. Conversely, the levels of ROS (H2O2 and O2·−) were significantly increased, while the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GR, and APX) were significantly decreased. Furthermore, high CO2 induced stomatal closure by promoting the accumulation of ROS and NO in guard cells. Through a proteomic analysis, we identified a total of 1652 DAPs after high CO2 treatment. GO functional annotation revealed that these DAPs were mainly associated with redox activity, catalytic activity, and ion binding. KEGG analysis showed an enrichment of DAPs in metabolic pathways, secondary metabolite biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, and photosynthetic pathways. Overall, our study provides valuable insights into the adaptation mechanisms of the tetraploid R. pseudoacacia to high CO2. Full article
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19 pages, 5050 KiB  
Article
Evolution of the WRKY Family in Angiosperms and Functional Diversity under Environmental Stress
by Weihuang Wu, Jinchang Yang, Niu Yu, Rongsheng Li, Zaixiang Yuan, Jisen Shi and Jinhui Chen
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(6), 3551; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25063551 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 759
Abstract
The transcription factor is an essential factor for regulating the responses of plants to external stimuli. The WRKY protein is a superfamily of plant transcription factors involved in response to various stresses (e.g., cold, heat, salt, drought, ions, pathogens, and insects). During angiosperm [...] Read more.
The transcription factor is an essential factor for regulating the responses of plants to external stimuli. The WRKY protein is a superfamily of plant transcription factors involved in response to various stresses (e.g., cold, heat, salt, drought, ions, pathogens, and insects). During angiosperm evolution, the number and function of WRKY transcription factors constantly change. After suffering from long-term environmental battering, plants of different evolutionary statuses ultimately retained different numbers of WRKY family members. The WRKY family of proteins is generally divided into three large categories of angiosperms, owing to their conserved domain and three-dimensional structures. The WRKY transcription factors mediate plant adaptation to various environments via participating in various biological pathways, such as ROS (reactive oxygen species) and hormone signaling pathways, further regulating plant enzyme systems, stomatal closure, and leaf shrinkage physiological responses. This article analyzed the evolution of the WRKY family in angiosperms and its functions in responding to various external environments, especially the function and evolution in Magnoliaceae plants. It helps to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution and functional diversity of the WRKY family and provides theoretical and experimental references for studying the molecular mechanisms of environmental stress. Full article
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13 pages, 1990 KiB  
Article
METACASPASE8 (MC8) Is a Crucial Protein in the LSD1-Dependent Cell Death Pathway in Response to Ultraviolet Stress
by Maciej Jerzy Bernacki, Anna Rusaczonek, Kinga Gołębiewska, Agata Barbara Majewska-Fala, Weronika Czarnocka and Stanisław Mariusz Karpiński
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(6), 3195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25063195 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 912
Abstract
LESION-SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) is one of the well-known cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The lsd1 mutant exhibits runaway cell death (RCD) in response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. The phenotype of the lsd1 mutant strongly depends on two other [...] Read more.
LESION-SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) is one of the well-known cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The lsd1 mutant exhibits runaway cell death (RCD) in response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. The phenotype of the lsd1 mutant strongly depends on two other proteins, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1) and PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) as well as on the synthesis/metabolism/signaling of salicylic acid (SA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the most interesting aspect of the lsd1 mutant is its conditional-dependent RCD phenotype, and thus, the defined role and function of LSD1 in the suppression of EDS1 and PAD4 in controlled laboratory conditions is different in comparison to a multivariable field environment. Analysis of the lsd1 mutant transcriptome in ambient laboratory and field conditions indicated that there were some candidate genes and proteins that might be involved in the regulation of the lsd1 conditional-dependent RCD phenotype. One of them is METACASPASE 8 (AT1G16420). This type II metacaspase was described as a cell death-positive regulator induced by UV-C irradiation and ROS accumulation. In the double mc8/lsd1 mutant, we discovered reversion of the lsd1 RCD phenotype in response to UV radiation applied in controlled laboratory conditions. This cell death deregulation observed in the lsd1 mutant was reverted like in double mutants of lsd1/eds1 and lsd1/pad4. To summarize, in this work, we demonstrated that MC8 is positively involved in EDS1 and PAD4 conditional-dependent regulation of cell death when LSD1 function is suppressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, we identified a new protein compound of the conditional LSD1-EDS1-PAD4 regulatory hub. We proposed a working model of MC8 involvement in the regulation of cell death and we postulated that MC8 is a crucial protein in this regulatory pathway. Full article
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16 pages, 10071 KiB  
Article
RNAi-Mediated Suppression of OsBBTI5 Promotes Salt Stress Tolerance in Rice
by Zhimin Lin, Xiaoyan Yi, Muhammad Moaaz Ali, Lijuan Zhang, Shaojuan Wang, Shengnan Tian and Faxing Chen
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(2), 1284; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25021284 - 20 Jan 2024
Viewed by 959
Abstract
This study explores the impact of RNAi in terms of selectively inhibiting the expression of the OsBBTI5 gene, with the primary objective of uncovering its involvement in the molecular mechanisms associated with salt tolerance in rice. OsBBTI5, belonging to the Bowman–Birk inhibitor [...] Read more.
This study explores the impact of RNAi in terms of selectively inhibiting the expression of the OsBBTI5 gene, with the primary objective of uncovering its involvement in the molecular mechanisms associated with salt tolerance in rice. OsBBTI5, belonging to the Bowman–Birk inhibitor (BBI) family gene, is known for its involvement in plant stress responses. The gene was successfully cloned from rice, exhibiting transcriptional self-activation in yeast. A yeast two-hybrid assay confirmed its specific binding to OsAPX2 (an ascorbate peroxidase gene). Transgenic OsBBTI5-RNAi plants displayed insensitivity to varying concentrations of 24-epibrassinolide in the brassinosteroid sensitivity assay. However, they showed reduced root and plant height at high concentrations (10 and 100 µM) of GA3 immersion. Enzyme activity assays revealed increased peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) content under 40-60 mM NaCl. Transcriptomic analysis indicated a significant upregulation of photosynthesis-related genes in transgenic plants under salt stress compared to the wild type. Notably, this study provides novel insights, suggesting that the BBI gene is part of the BR signaling pathway, and that OsBBTI5 potentially enhances stress tolerance in transgenic plants through interaction with the salt stress-related gene OsAPX2. Full article
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Review

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15 pages, 1973 KiB  
Review
NO and H2S Contribute to Crop Resilience against Atmospheric Stressors
by Francisco J. Corpas
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(6), 3509; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25063509 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 612
Abstract
Atmospheric stressors include a variety of pollutant gases such as CO2, nitrous oxide (NOx), and sulfurous compounds which could have a natural origin or be generated by uncontrolled human activity. Nevertheless, other atmospheric elements including high and low temperatures, ozone (O [...] Read more.
Atmospheric stressors include a variety of pollutant gases such as CO2, nitrous oxide (NOx), and sulfurous compounds which could have a natural origin or be generated by uncontrolled human activity. Nevertheless, other atmospheric elements including high and low temperatures, ozone (O3), UV-B radiation, or acid rain among others can affect, at different levels, a large number of plant species, particularly those of agronomic interest. Paradoxically, both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), until recently were considered toxic since they are part of the polluting gases; however, at present, these molecules are part of the mechanism of response to multiple stresses since they exert signaling functions which usually have an associated stimulation of the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. At present, these gasotransmitters are considered essential components of the defense against a wide range of environmental stresses including atmospheric ones. This review aims to provide an updated vision of the endogenous metabolism of NO and H2S in plant cells and to deepen how the exogenous application of these compounds can contribute to crop resilience, particularly, against atmospheric stressors stimulating antioxidant systems. Full article
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