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The Application of Biomaterials in Bone Tissue Repair and Regeneration

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2751

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Dental Surgery Department, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-367 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: medical and dental lasers; laser surface processing; laser decontamination; laser ablation; laser in bone surgery; photobiomodulation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to be able to invite you to submit a manuscript to the forthcoming Special Issue of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IF: 5.6), entitled “The Application of Biomaterials in Bone Tissue Repair and Regeneration”.

This Special Issue is dedicated to an in-depth exploration of the potential applications inherent in mineralized tissue substitutes within the realms of both medicine and dentistry. The primary is to present a meticulous examination of the utilization of bone substitute materials to facilitate the natural emulation of the intricate bone cellular system, with a concerted effort to enhance our comprehension of the underlying bony nanostructure. Particular emphasis is placed on the judicious employment of synthetic biomaterials as bone substitutes, with a specific focus on novel methodologies involving nanomaterials and their rigorous assessment for clinical efficacy. Encompassing a wide array of subjects, including the characterization and application of bone substitute materials, biocompatibility assessment, physicochemical properties, materials in endodontic surgery, and the mechanical and biocompatible properties of CAD/CAM restorative materials, this Issue is poised to make substantial contributions to the scientific discourse surrounding advancements in the application of mineralized tissue substitutes across diverse domains.

This Issue focuses on advancing our understanding of biomaterial applications in the intricate process of bone tissue repair and regeneration. Submitted papers for this Special Issue are expected to present results that delve into molecular-level findings. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the intricate molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between biomaterials and bone tissues, aiming to contribute valuable insights to the field of bone regeneration research.

Dr. Jacek Matys
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • allograft
  • autograft
  • autologous bone
  • bone
  • graft materials
  • mineral substitutes
  • regeneration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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27 pages, 8271 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Electroactive Phases of Poly(vinylidene Fluoride) Fibers for Tissue Engineering Applications
by Angelika Zaszczyńska, Arkadiusz Gradys, Anna Ziemiecka, Piotr K. Szewczyk, Ryszard Tymkiewicz, Małgorzata Lewandowska-Szumieł, Urszula Stachewicz and Paweł Ł. Sajkiewicz
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(9), 4980; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25094980 - 2 May 2024
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Abstract
Nanofibrous materials generated through electrospinning have gained significant attention in tissue regeneration, particularly in the domain of bone reconstruction. There is high interest in designing a material resembling bone tissue, and many scientists are trying to create materials applicable to bone tissue engineering [...] Read more.
Nanofibrous materials generated through electrospinning have gained significant attention in tissue regeneration, particularly in the domain of bone reconstruction. There is high interest in designing a material resembling bone tissue, and many scientists are trying to create materials applicable to bone tissue engineering with piezoelectricity similar to bone. One of the prospective candidates is highly piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), which was used for fibrous scaffold formation by electrospinning. In this study, we focused on the effect of PVDF molecular weight (180,000 g/mol and 530,000 g/mol) and process parameters, such as the rotational speed of the collector, applied voltage, and solution flow rate on the properties of the final scaffold. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy allows for determining the effect of molecular weight and processing parameters on the content of the electroactive phases. It can be concluded that the higher molecular weight of the PVDF and higher collector rotational speed increase nanofibers’ diameter, electroactive phase content, and piezoelectric coefficient. Various electrospinning parameters showed changes in electroactive phase content with the maximum at the applied voltage of 22 kV and flow rate of 0.8 mL/h. Moreover, the cytocompatibility of the scaffolds was confirmed in the culture of human adipose-derived stromal cells with known potential for osteogenic differentiation. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that PVDF scaffolds may be taken into account as a tool in bone tissue engineering and are worth further investigation. Full article
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Review

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32 pages, 2385 KiB  
Review
Advancements in Photothermal Therapy Using Near-Infrared Light for Bone Tumors
by Mengzhang Xie, Taojun Gong, Yitian Wang, Zhuangzhuang Li, Minxun Lu, Yi Luo, Li Min, Chongqi Tu, Xingdong Zhang, Qin Zeng and Yong Zhou
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(8), 4139; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25084139 - 9 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1039
Abstract
Bone tumors, particularly osteosarcoma, are prevalent among children and adolescents. This ailment has emerged as the second most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality in adolescents. Conventional treatment methods comprise extensive surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Consequently, the management of bone tumors and bone [...] Read more.
Bone tumors, particularly osteosarcoma, are prevalent among children and adolescents. This ailment has emerged as the second most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality in adolescents. Conventional treatment methods comprise extensive surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Consequently, the management of bone tumors and bone regeneration poses significant clinical challenges. Photothermal tumor therapy has attracted considerable attention owing to its minimal invasiveness and high selectivity. However, key challenges have limited its widespread clinical use. Enhancing the tumor specificity of photosensitizers through targeting or localized activation holds potential for better outcomes with fewer adverse effects. Combinations with chemotherapies or immunotherapies also present avenues for improvement. In this review, we provide an overview of the most recent strategies aimed at overcoming the limitations of photothermal therapy (PTT), along with current research directions in the context of bone tumors, including (1) target strategies, (2) photothermal therapy combined with multiple therapies (immunotherapies, chemotherapies, and chemodynamic therapies, magnetic, and photodynamic therapies), and (3) bifunctional scaffolds for photothermal therapy and bone regeneration. We delve into the pros and cons of these combination methods and explore current research focal points. Lastly, we address the challenges and prospects of photothermal combination therapy. Full article
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28 pages, 2419 KiB  
Review
An Overview on the Big Players in Bone Tissue Engineering: Biomaterials, Scaffolds and Cells
by Maria Pia Ferraz
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(7), 3836; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25073836 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 813
Abstract
Presently, millions worldwide suffer from degenerative and inflammatory bone and joint issues, comprising roughly half of chronic ailments in those over 50, leading to prolonged discomfort and physical limitations. These conditions become more prevalent with age and lifestyle factors, escalating due to the [...] Read more.
Presently, millions worldwide suffer from degenerative and inflammatory bone and joint issues, comprising roughly half of chronic ailments in those over 50, leading to prolonged discomfort and physical limitations. These conditions become more prevalent with age and lifestyle factors, escalating due to the growing elderly populace. Addressing these challenges often entails surgical interventions utilizing implants or bone grafts, though these treatments may entail complications such as pain and tissue death at donor sites for grafts, along with immune rejection. To surmount these challenges, tissue engineering has emerged as a promising avenue for bone injury repair and reconstruction. It involves the use of different biomaterials and the development of three-dimensional porous matrices and scaffolds, alongside osteoprogenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate natural tissue regeneration. This review compiles methodologies that can be used to develop biomaterials that are important in bone tissue replacement and regeneration. Biomaterials for orthopedic implants, several scaffold types and production methods, as well as techniques to assess biomaterials’ suitability for human use—both in laboratory settings and within living organisms—are discussed. Even though researchers have had some success, there is still room for improvements in their processing techniques, especially the ones that make scaffolds mechanically stronger without weakening their biological characteristics. Bone tissue engineering is therefore a promising area due to the rise in bone-related injuries. Full article
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