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Foodborne Pathogens and Illnesses

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 8560

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), 27002 Lugo, Spain
Interests: food microbiology; food-borne pathogens; biofilm; antimicrobial resistance; microbiome; genomics; transcriptomics
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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Santiago de Compostela University, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Interests: breast milk; functional components; baby food; probiotics; microbiota; food-borne pathogens; food safety; analytical chemistry; chromatography; mass spectrometry; omics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the study of microbiota has revolutionized most fields of research in the biological sciences. Microbiota have a fundamental role in both human and animal health and disease. In the specific case of gut microbiota, they act as a second barrier against colonization by pathogens, regulate the development and maturation of the immune system, provide beneficial metabolites for host nutrition, and, more importantly, have a functional influence on each component that maintains intestinal homeostasis. While healthy microbiota can promote resistance to colonization by pathogenic species, dysbiosis or a microbial imbalance may promote the expansion or enhanced virulence of pathogenic populations. As a classical example, antibiotics can modify taxonomic, genomic, and functional features of gut microbiota, resulting in colonization by such pathogens as Clostridium difficile. In addition, saccharolytic members of the microbiota can be liberated from sugars in mucus layers as sialic acid or fucose that can be used by Salmonella typhimurium as a source of energy, promoting its growth. However, healthy microbiota also have mechanisms for protection. For example, short-chain fatty acids produced by the bacterial metabolism can inhibit the growth of pathogens and enhance the production of antimicrobial peptides by immune cells. In contrast, bacteriocins and bacteriophages can inhibit the growth of specific bacterial groups.

This Special Issue welcomes original research articles and literature reviews on interactions between pathogens and microbiota or specific components of microbiota, such as bacterial metabolites. This Special Issue also welcomes studies on the development of new strategies for modulating microbiota to make them resistant to bacterial infections.

Dr. Alexandre Lamas
Dr. Patricia Regal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbiota
  • microbiota modulation
  • pathogen
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • host
  • inflammation
  • bacteriocin
  • bacteriophage
  • quorum sensing
  • stress hormones

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1282 KiB  
Article
Investigation of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Listeria monocytogenes from 2010 through to 2021
by Robert M. Hanes and Zuyi Huang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5506; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095506 - 1 May 2022
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 2775
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a serious public health issue. Due to resistance to current antibiotics and a low rate of development of new classes of antimicrobials, AMR is a leading cause of death worldwide. Listeria monocytogenes is a deadly foodborne pathogen that causes [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a serious public health issue. Due to resistance to current antibiotics and a low rate of development of new classes of antimicrobials, AMR is a leading cause of death worldwide. Listeria monocytogenes is a deadly foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis for the immunocompromised, the elderly, and pregnant women. Unfortunately, antimicrobial resistance has been reported in L. monocytogenes. This study conducted the first comprehensive statistical analysis of L. monocytogenes isolate data from the National Pathogen Detection Isolate Browser (NPDIB) to identify the trends for AMR genes in L. monocytogenes. Principal component analysis was firstly used to project the multi-dimensional data into two dimensions. Hierarchical clustering was then used to identify the significant AMR genes found in L. monocytogenes samples and to assess changes during the period from 2010 through to 2021. Statistical analysis of the data identified fosX, lin, abc-f, and tet(M) as the four most common AMR genes found in L. monocytogenes. It was determined that there was no increase in AMR genes during the studied time period. It was also observed that the number of isolates decreased from 2016 to 2020. This study establishes a baseline for the ongoing monitoring of L. monocytogenes for AMR genes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogens and Illnesses)
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14 pages, 1730 KiB  
Article
Transcriptional Analysis of Microcystis aeruginosa Co-Cultured with Algicidal Bacteria Brevibacillus laterosporus
by Yulei Zhang, Dong Chen, Ning Zhang, Feng Li, Xiaoxia Luo, Qianru Li, Changling Li and Xianghu Huang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8615; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168615 - 15 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2199
Abstract
Harmful algal blooms caused huge ecological damage and economic losses around the world. Controlling algal blooms by algicidal bacteria is expected to be an effective biological control method. The current study investigated the molecular mechanism of harmful cyanobacteria disrupted by algicidal bacteria. Microcystis [...] Read more.
Harmful algal blooms caused huge ecological damage and economic losses around the world. Controlling algal blooms by algicidal bacteria is expected to be an effective biological control method. The current study investigated the molecular mechanism of harmful cyanobacteria disrupted by algicidal bacteria. Microcystis aeruginosa was co-cultured with Brevibacillus laterosporus Bl-zj, and RNA-seq based transcriptomic analysis was performed compared to M. aeruginosa, which was cultivated separately. A total of 1706 differentially expressed genes were identified, which were mainly involved in carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism and amino acid metabolism. In the co-cultured group, the expression of genes mainly enriched in photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation were significantly inhibited. However, the expression of the genes related to fatty acid synthesis increased. In addition, the expression of the antioxidant enzymes, such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxin, was increased. These results suggested that B. laterosporus could block the electron transport by attacking the PSI system and complex I of M. aeruginosa, affecting the energy acquisition and causing oxidative damage. This further led to the lipid peroxidation of the microalgal cell membrane, resulting in algal death. The transcriptional analysis of algicidal bacteria in the interaction process can be combined to explain the algicidal mechanism in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogens and Illnesses)
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12 pages, 3486 KiB  
Article
Suppression of Rice Blast by Bacterial Strains Isolated from Cultivated Soda Saline-Sodic Soils
by Yi Wei, Lanhui Li, Wenjun Hu, Huiyan Ju, Mingzhe Zhang, Qingming Qin, Shihong Zhang and Guihua Li
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5248; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145248 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2817
Abstract
Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most serious rice diseases worldwide. Biological control is gaining popularity as a promising method for the control of this disease; however, more effective microbial strains with strong adaptability in rice fields need to [...] Read more.
Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most serious rice diseases worldwide. Biological control is gaining popularity as a promising method for the control of this disease; however, more effective microbial strains with strong adaptability in rice fields need to be identified. Here, we report for the first time the successful identification of biocontrol bacterial strains from frozen soils of the soda saline-sodic land. We isolated 82 bacterial strains from rice fields in the western Songnen Plain of China, one of the three major soda saline soils in the world. Five of the isolated strains exhibited strong inhibition to M. oryzae growth. The potential strains were identified as Bacillus safensis JLS5, Pseudomonas koreensis JLS8, Pseudomonas saponiphila JLS10, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila JLS11 and Bacillus tequilensis JLS12, respectively, by 16s RNA gene sequence analysis. The antagonistic assay and the artificial inoculation tests showed that JLS5 and JLS12 could effectively inhibit conidial germination and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus, both preventively and curatively. The suppression of pathogenicity was further confirmed by greenhouse experiments, showing the effectiveness of JLS5 and JLS12 as a potential biological control agents of M. oryzae. The potential application of these cold-tolerant strains for rice blast control in cold regions is discussed. Our data suggest that soda saline-sodic soils are a rich source for biocontrol strain isolation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogens and Illnesses)
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