Rapid Detection and Identification Methods for Food Quality and Safety

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 July 2024 | Viewed by 1528

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Biological Sciences, Department of Genetics, Physiology and Microbiology, Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: food traceability; seafood; species identification; geographic origin; production method PCR/qPCR; isothermal PCR; next-generation sequencing; microbiome; honeybees

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Guest Editor
Food Quality and Safety Research Group, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), Braga, Portugal
Interests: foodborne pathogens; microbiology; food microbiology; food safety; fast detection tools; PCR/ qPCR; fast multipathogen detection; food quality and safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), 27002 Lugo, Spain
Interests: food microbiology; food-borne pathogens; biofilm; antimicrobial resistance; microbiome; genomics; transcriptomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food traceability and safety control are essential in order to achieve an efficient, cost-effective, sustainable, healthy, and safe food production system.  Every year, many cases of foodborne illnesses are registered globally, which could be avoided with more rigorous foodborne pathogen evaluations that ensure security along the complete food supply chain. On the other hand, the potential fraud and/or adulteration of food products, including non-declared ingredients or species substitutions, should be tracked to ensure the transparency of the sector and to protect natural resources and consumers’ rights. For this control to be possible and adequate, having fast, portable, and cost-effective technologies that can be applied in any point of the supply chain is essential. There is an urgent need to develop new rapid detection and identification tools that allow the monitoring of a food product, its components, and its potential pathogens from the origin of the raw materials to its final point of sale. This Special Issue will examine the new methodologies for rapid detection and identification that have been developed with the aim of promoting and improving control and food safety.

Dr. Ana Marta Muñoz-Colmenero
Dr. Alejandro Garrido-Maestu
Dr. Alexandre Lamas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rapid methods
  • traceability
  • food safety
  • food control
  • food detection

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 1817 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Novel mTA10 Selective Broth, MSB, for the Co-Enrichment and Detection of Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli O157 and Listeria monocytogenes in Ready-to-Eat Salad Samples
by Ana Costa-Ribeiro, Alexandre Lamas, Marta Prado and Alejandro Garrido-Maestu
Foods 2024, 13(1), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010063 - 23 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1101
Abstract
Multiplex assays implementing DNA-based methods have been demonstrated as suitable alternatives to culture-based microbiological methods; however, in most cases, they still require a suitable enrichment step. Finding suitable enrichment conditions for different bacteria may result in challenges. In the present study, a novel [...] Read more.
Multiplex assays implementing DNA-based methods have been demonstrated as suitable alternatives to culture-based microbiological methods; however, in most cases, they still require a suitable enrichment step. Finding suitable enrichment conditions for different bacteria may result in challenges. In the present study, a novel selective broth named MSB (mTA10 selective broth) was formulated for the simultaneous recovery of Salmonella spp., E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes. Attention was paid to ensure the optimal enrichment of L. monocytogenes as its enrichment is more challenging. To this end, cellobiose was added to increase the growth of L. monocytogenes, and sodium pyruvate was also added to improve the recovery of stressed bacteria. Four selective agents were added, namely nalidixic acid, sodium cholate, lithium chloride and potassium tellurite, to control the growth of interfering microorganisms. It was concluded that the novel broth was suitable for the simultaneous enrichment of the target pathogens, allowing them to reach concentrations higher than 7 log CFU/mL for each bacterium in pure culture. Furthermore, all heavily contaminated ready-to-eat salad samples reached concentrations higher than 5 log CFU/g. Finally, after 24 h of enrichment of spiked salad, it was possible to detect concentrations below 10 CFU/25 g. Full article
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