Soil Carbon in Forest Ecosystems

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Soil".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2024 | Viewed by 719

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Agriculture on the Loess Plateau, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Xiangyang 712100, China
Interests: forests carbon cycle; soil water cycle; arid area; loess plateau; soil hydrology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061, China
Interests: global change; carbon cycle; microbial ecology; loess plateau; pedology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Agriculture on the Loess Plateau, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
Interests: soil animals; forest carbon cycle; climate change; loess plateau; soil ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Agriculture on the Loess Plateau, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) & Ministry of Water Resources (MWR), Yangling, Wuhan 712100, China
Interests: water–soil relationship; arid region; agroecosystem; deep soil layer; land use change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global warming is one of the most serious problems in the world today. Forest ecosystems play an irreplaceable role in mitigating global warming, among which forest soil, as the largest carbon pool in terrestrial ecosystems, has attracted much attention. In the context of climate change and human activities, forest soil carbon storage is in great uncertainty. Therefore, this Special Issue focuses on the process and mechanism of soil carbon cycling in forest ecosystems under the combined influence of climate change and human activities.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Soil carbon difference between natural forests and plantation forests and their mechanisms;
  • Status, dynamic change and potential of forest soil carbon storage;
  • Effects of forest structure and management measures on soil carbon;
  • Forest deep soil carbon storage;
  • Change trend and mechanism of forest soil carbon in future climate.

Dr. Jiangbo Qiao
Dr. Yang Yang
Dr. Tongchuan Li
Dr. Yuanjun Zhu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • climate change
  • human activities
  • forest ecosystem
  • soil carbon cycle
  • global warming

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 4740 KiB  
Article
Dynamics of Carbon and Water Fluxes over Cropland and Agroforest Ecosystems on the Southern Chinese Loess Plateau
by Xiaoyang Han, Fengru Fang, Chenyun Bai, Kang Du, Yuanjun Zhu and Wenzhao Liu
Forests 2024, 15(5), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15050774 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 536
Abstract
Studies on the spatiotemporal dynamics in ecosystem carbon and water exchanges are essential in predicting the effects of climate change on regional carbon and energy budgets. Using the eddy covariance technique, carbon and water fluxes were observed in a typical winter wheat ecosystem [...] Read more.
Studies on the spatiotemporal dynamics in ecosystem carbon and water exchanges are essential in predicting the effects of climate change on regional carbon and energy budgets. Using the eddy covariance technique, carbon and water fluxes were observed in a typical winter wheat ecosystem (WWE) and an agroforest ecosystem (AFE) in the southern Loess Plateau from 2004 to 2010. The seasonal and inter-annual variability in gross primary productivity (GPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), evapotranspiration (ET), and water use efficiency (WUE) were examined and the main influencing factors were identified using the Pearson correlation. The results indicate that the seasonal GPP and NEE showed a bimodal distribution in WWE, while this was unimodal in AFE. The sinusoidal function did well in the characterization of seasonal ET dynamics for both ecosystems, with the determination coefficients being 0.85 and 0.94, respectively. In WWE and AFE, the annual mean GPP were 724.33 and 723.08 g C m−2 a−1, respectively, and the corresponding ET were 392.22 and 410.02 mm a−1. However, the difference in NEE between the two ecosystems was obvious, NEE were −446.28 and −549.08 g C m−2 a−1, respectively, showing a stronger carbon sink in AFE. There were strong coupling relationships between the GPP and ET of both ecosystems; the overall slopes were 1.71 and 1.69, respectively. The seasonal trend of WUE was bimodal in WWE, with peak values of 3.94 and 3.65 g C kg−1 H2O, occurring in November and April, respectively. However, the monthly WUE in AFE had one single peak of 4.07 g C kg−1 H2O in January. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and soil temperature (Ts) were most positively correlated with GPP, net radiation (Rn) and Ts were the major factors influencing ET, while vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and soil water content (SWC) were the major influencing factors for WUE. These results provide observational support for regional carbon neutrality simulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Carbon in Forest Ecosystems)
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