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Climate Change and Agriculture

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 June 2023) | Viewed by 6303

Special Issue Editors


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State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China
Interests: soil science; plant nutrition; sustainable vegetable production; planetary boundary; human nutrition; climate changes
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Key Laboratory of Water Environment Evolution and Pollution Control in Three Gorges Reservoir, Chongqing Three Gorges University, Chongqing 404100, China
Interests: soil organic carbon; climate change
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State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061, China
Interests: global change; carbon cycle; microbial ecology; loess plateau; pedology
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College of Land and Environment, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866, China
Interests: pedogenesis; soil geography; loess-paleosol evolution; paleoclimate change; soil health evaluation
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INRES—Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, Division of Horticultural Sciences, University of Bonn, 53121 Bonn, Germany
Interests: vegetables; climate change; horticulture; soilless culture; growing media; protected cultivation; greenhouse production
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change refers to long-term shifts in temperatures and weather patterns, dramatically affected by anthropogenic activities. The past several decades have witnessed intensive focus on the impact of climate changes, such as elevated CO2, increasing temperature, abrupt drought or heat stresses, and weather extremes on the production and quality of crops. The questions arise of how to feed the increasing global population, what agriculture should do to mitigate this impact, and how sustainable production should contribute to reducing this impact. Furthermore, the deterioration in grain and edible horticultural crops is resulting in “hidden hunger” that is threatening human health. In order to produce food sustainably, the agricultural ecosystem needs to alleviate the negative impact on climates by various mechanisms, such as decreased greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O, and CH4) emission and water use efficiency, as well as increased soil carbon sequestration. However, we lack a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of the interactions between climate change and agriculture to achieve sustainable food production, and to mitigate the potential impact on climates.

This Special Issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the interplay between climate change and agriculture. New research papers, reviews, case studies, and reports are welcome for submission to this Issue. Papers dealing with new approaches or modelling within agricultural ecosystems are also welcome. Other accepted manuscript types include methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries. We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines related to this topic, including agricultural meteorology, agronomy, horticulture, soil science, plant science, paleoclimatology, environmental nutrition, and ecology.

Topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  1. Impact of climate change on crop production and quality, biogeochemistry, soil nutrient (C, N, and P) cycle, pedogenesis, and soil health;
  2. Greenhouse gas emission in agricultural ecosystems;
  3. How to achieve sustainable food production under a changing climate;
  4. Climate changes associated with food supply chain and human dietary patterns;
  5. Paleoclimatology and its relationship with agriculture;
  6. How agricultural ecosystems adapt to climate change.

Dr. Jinlong Dong
Prof. Dr. Junjie Lin
Dr. Yang Yang
Dr. Zhongxiu Sun
Prof. Dr. Nazim Gruda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • soil health
  • sustainable food production
  • nutrient cycle
  • agricultural ecosystem
  • human nutrition

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2796 KiB  
Article
China Requires a Sustainable Transition of Vegetable Supply from Area-Dependent to Yield-Dependent and Decreased Vegetable Loss and Waste
by Ying Tang, Jinlong Dong, Nazim Gruda and Haibo Jiang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1223; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021223 - 10 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1567
Abstract
China, the largest country in vegetable supply, faces a transition to sustainable vegetable production to counteract resource waste and environmental pollution. However, there are knowledge gaps on the main constraints and how to achieve sustainable vegetable supply. Herein, we integrated the vegetable production [...] Read more.
China, the largest country in vegetable supply, faces a transition to sustainable vegetable production to counteract resource waste and environmental pollution. However, there are knowledge gaps on the main constraints and how to achieve sustainable vegetable supply. Herein, we integrated the vegetable production and supply data in China, compared its current status with five horticulture-developed countries US, the Netherlands, Greece, Japan and South Korea, using data from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and National Bureau of Statistics of China, and predicted the vegetable supply in 2030 and 2050 by a model prediction. The vegetable supply in China increased from 592 g capita−1 d−1 in 1995 to 1262 g capita−1 d−1 in 2018 and will keep constant in 2030 and 2050. Compared to the five countries, the greater vegetable supply is primarily achieved by higher harvested areas rather than higher yield. However, it is predicted that the harvested areas will decrease by 13.6% and 24.7% in 2030 and 2050. Instead, steady increases in vegetable yield by 11.8% and 28.3% are predicted for this period. The high vegetable supply and greater vegetable preference indicated by the high vegetable-to-meat production ratio cannot guarantee recommended vegetable intake, potentially due to the high rate of vegetable loss and waste. Under the scenarios of decreased vegetable loss and waste, the harvested area will decrease by 37.3–67.2% in 2030 and 2050. This study points out that the sustainable transition of Chinese vegetable supply can be realized by enhancing yield and limiting vegetable loss and waste instead of expanding the harvested area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Agriculture)
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16 pages, 5984 KiB  
Article
Spatial Distribution and Estimation Model of Soil pH in Coastal Eastern China
by Xiansheng Xie, Jianfei Qiu, Xinxin Feng, Yanlin Hou, Shuojin Wang, Shugang Jia, Shutian Liu, Xianda Hou and Sen Dou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16855; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416855 - 15 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1519
Abstract
Soil pH is an essential indicator for assessing soil quality and soil health. In this study, based on the Chinese farmland soil survey dataset and meteorological dataset, the spatial distribution characteristics of soil pH in coastal eastern China were analyzed using kriging interpolation. [...] Read more.
Soil pH is an essential indicator for assessing soil quality and soil health. In this study, based on the Chinese farmland soil survey dataset and meteorological dataset, the spatial distribution characteristics of soil pH in coastal eastern China were analyzed using kriging interpolation. The relationships between hydrothermal conditions and soil pH were explored using regression analysis with mean annual precipitation (MAP), mean annual temperature (MAT), the ratio of precipitation to temperature (P/T), and the product of precipitation and temperature (P*T) as the main explanatory variables. Based on this, a model that can rapidly estimate soil pH was established. The results showed that: (a) The spatial heterogeneity of soil pH in coastal eastern China was obvious, with the values gradually decreasing from north to south, ranging from 4.5 to 8.5; (b) soil pH was significantly correlated with all explanatory variables at the 0.01 level. In general, MAP was the main factor affecting soil pH (r = −0.7244), followed by P/T (r = −0.6007). In the regions with MAP < 800 mm, soil pH was negatively correlated with MAP (r = −0.4631) and P/T (r = −0.7041), respectively, and positively correlated with MAT (r = 0.6093) and P*T (r = 0.3951), respectively. In the regions with MAP > 800 mm, soil pH was negatively correlated with MAP (r = −0.6651), MAT (r = −0.5047), P/T (r = −0.3268), and P*T (r = −0.5808), respectively. (c) The estimation model of soil pH was: y = 23.4572 − 6.3930 × lgMAP + 0.1312 × MAT. It has been verified to have a high accuracy (r = 0.7743, p < 0.01). The mean error, the mean absolute error, and the root mean square error were 0.0450, 0.5300, and 0.7193, respectively. It provides a new path for rapid estimation of the regional soil pH, which is important for improving the management of agricultural production and slowing down soil degradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Agriculture)
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15 pages, 553 KiB  
Article
Financing the Agri-Environmental Policy: Consequences on the Economic Growth and Environmental Quality in Romania
by Nicoleta Mihaela Doran, Roxana Maria Bădîrcea and Marius Dalian Doran
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 13908; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192113908 - 26 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1277
Abstract
The aim of this research is to point out the impact that the application of the agri-environmental policy has on the economic growth and on the quality of the environment, these being the main aspects targeted by the practice of a sustainable agriculture. [...] Read more.
The aim of this research is to point out the impact that the application of the agri-environmental policy has on the economic growth and on the quality of the environment, these being the main aspects targeted by the practice of a sustainable agriculture. The research is conducted based on the agri-environment indicators for Romania for the period of time between 1997 and 2019. In order to answer the objectives of this whole research, we performed stationarity tests, a cointegration test and used the Fully Modified Least Squares (FMOLS) method to estimate the relationships between the variables included in the three proposed models. The obtained results highlighted the positive influence exerted by the area that was arranged for irrigation and the agricultural area that was arranged with drainage works on the GDP, but also the negative influence of the amount of natural fertilizers used in agriculture. The use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides generates an increase in environmental degradation, meaning CO2 emissions, while an increase in the agricultural area arranged with erosion control and land improvement works, leads to reducing environmental degradations. The limitations of this research lie in the fact that the agri-environmental indicators are specific to each country in the European Union and, therefore, it is difficult to make comparisons with other member states or to apply the measures recommended for Romania to other states with similar agricultural and economic systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Agriculture)
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18 pages, 1018 KiB  
Article
Rapid Analysis of Residues of 186 Pesticides in Hawk Tea Using Modified QuEChERS Coupled with Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry
by Xiao Shu, Nengming Chu, Xuemei Zhang, Xiaoxia Yang, Xia Meng, Junying Yang and Na Wang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12639; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912639 - 03 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1339
Abstract
In this work, the QuEChERS method was modified and evaluated for the determination of 186 pesticides from caffeine-free and fatty hawk tea prior to their gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis for the first time. The results showed that the combination of MgSO [...] Read more.
In this work, the QuEChERS method was modified and evaluated for the determination of 186 pesticides from caffeine-free and fatty hawk tea prior to their gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis for the first time. The results showed that the combination of MgSO4 + PSA + MWCNTs plus EMR-Lipid provided the lowest matrix effect and best recovery; 117 of 186 pesticides manifested weak matrix effects. Thus, for accurate quantification, it is necessary to use matrix-matched calibration curves to compensate for the matrix effect. At the spiked level of 0.1 mg/kg, the average recoveries of 184 pesticides were in the range of 70–120% and the RSDs were 0.3–14.4% by the modified method. Good linearity was shown for 186 analytes at concentration of 0.01 mg/L~0.4 mg/L, and the correlation coefficients exceeded 0.99 for 182 pesticides. The detection limits of 186 pesticides by the modified QuEChERS method were 0.001–0.02 mg/kg, and the limits of quantification (LOQ) were 0.005 mg/kg~0.05 mg/kg. The necessity of solvent exchange is also explained in this work. The successful application of the modified QuEChERS in real samples proved that this method could be one of the routine options for analysis of herbal tea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Agriculture)
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