Specialized Metabolites from Actinomycetes: From Gene to Product and Back

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Metabolism, Physiology & Genetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2016) | Viewed by 5176

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Scienze della Vita, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, Via J.H. Dunant 3, 21100 Varese, Italy
Interests: actinomycetes; natural products; antibiotics; resistome; glycopeptides; lantibiotics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Among living organisms, filamentous actinomycetes still represent one of the most interesting sources for the discovery of novel, bioactive microbial products, also known as secondary or specialized metabolites. It is estimated that two-thirds of currently used antibiotics originate from the Streptomyces genus, and 45% of described specialized metabolites are produced by filamentous actinomycetes, including increasing numbers of bioactive glycopeptides, lantibiotics, and polketides, which are produced by uncommon genera of non-streptomyces actinomycetes. The ever-increasing number of sequenced microbial genomes, which unveil the distribution and diversity of gene clusters that encode the novel biosynthetic pathways (or interesting variants of those already described) that produce bioactive microbial products, confirm the primary role of this bacterial group in the discovery and development of novel drugs. A parallel in-depth understanding of the tight regulatory networks that control specialized metabolite production in these organisms (in response to diverse environmental and intracellular signals) is triggering the development of novel fermentation processes and strain improvement approaches, which can complement and/or replace the traditional ones currently in use in industrial environments. In this Special Issue, we invite authors to submit original research and review articles that address our understanding of, and eventually address, the current bottlenecks in the process of fermentation and the strain improvement of novel and old specialized metabolites from actinomycetes.

Prof. Dr. Flavia Marinelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • actinomycetes
  • fermentation
  • strain improvement
  • recombinant engineering
  • specialized metabolites
  • antibiotics
  • elicitors
  • heterologus expression
  • genome mining

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Brief Report
The Application of an On-Line Optical Sensor to Measure Biomass of a Filamentous Bioprocess
by Ismini Nakouti and Glyn Hobbs
Fermentation 2015, 1(1), 79-85; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation1010079 - 24 Sep 2015
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4657
Abstract
Monitoring of all critical process parameters in bioprocess engineering is essential. Sensors have been previously developed for specific parameters such as on-line temperature, pH or stirring control and data logging. However, biomass monitoring needs further development. All current non-invasive technology, such as Near [...] Read more.
Monitoring of all critical process parameters in bioprocess engineering is essential. Sensors have been previously developed for specific parameters such as on-line temperature, pH or stirring control and data logging. However, biomass monitoring needs further development. All current non-invasive technology, such as Near Infra-Red, is limited on biomass measurement of animal and insect cells. Biomass monitoring of industrial bioprocesses of filamentous microorganisms still requires sample removal from the vessel, which could potentially compromise sterility. This study has focused on the application of a non-invasive optical sensor in the on-line monitoring of the biomass of the filamentous microorganism Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2). Raw output data from the biomass monitor were directly compared to data from the sensors measuring dissolved oxygen levels and off gas evolution and the results successfully demonstrate that the optical sensor is sensitive in identifying different levels of biomass. Therefore, it is possible to use the simple output data to provide real time information on biomass levels of filamentous microorganisms, a very powerful tool in bioprocess engineering. Full article
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