Microbial Foods—The Science of Fermented Foods

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018) | Viewed by 28475

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Guest Editor
Hellenic Agricultural Organisation-DEMETER Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products Sofokli Venizelou 1, Lycovrissi, 14123 Attica, Greece
Interests: food fermentation; olive, meat, dairy, wine fermentation; food safety; probiotics; functional foods; food processing; high pressure; metabolomics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermented foods are the result of the metabolic activity of a complex microbiota, consisting of the indigenous microorganisms naturally associated with the raw materials, and/or selected microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts) inoculated as starter cultures. Traditional fermented foods represent a valuable cultural heritage in most regions, and harbor a vast genetic potential of valuable strains. The study of the microbial ecology of naturally fermented foods and the identification of microbial diversity using metagenomic approaches are of interest. Metabolomic and proteomic approaches are also important to study the physiology and genetics of microorganisms.

Starter cultures (single or mixed) are essential for a complete fermentation and a final product of certain quality. Functional, including probiotic, properties of these cultures give an added nutritional value to the fermented foods enhancing the beneficial role of fermented foods in human health by affecting the gut microbiota.

This Special Issue on “Microbial Foods—The Science of Fermented Foods” will also include studies on modern/rapid tools to monitor the fermentation procedure in order to ensure the quality and safety of the final product.

Dr. Chrysoula Tassou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbial ecology
  • metagenomics and microbial diversity
  • starter culture physiology and genetics
  • metabolomics
  • functional/probiotic starters
  • fermented foods and gut microbiota
  • modern tools for fermentation monitoring
  • safety of fermented foods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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11 pages, 9999 KiB  
Article
Cell Wall and Whole Cell Proteomes Define Flocculation and Fermentation Behavior of Yeast
by Edward D. Kerr, Duin C. McDiarmid, James A. Fraser and Benjamin L. Schulz
Fermentation 2018, 4(3), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation4030080 - 19 Sep 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4365
Abstract
Flocculation is one of the most important characteristics of brewing yeast as it allows for the easy and cheap removal of cells after fermentation. The genes responsible for both the Flo1 and NewFlo flocculation phenotypes are well characterized. However, the relationship between Flo [...] Read more.
Flocculation is one of the most important characteristics of brewing yeast as it allows for the easy and cheap removal of cells after fermentation. The genes responsible for both the Flo1 and NewFlo flocculation phenotypes are well characterized. However, the relationship between Flo protein abundance and flocculation efficiency is poorly understood. In this present study, we used mass spectrometry proteomics to compare the cell wall and whole cell proteomes of commercial yeast strains with diverse flocculation behaviors. We found that the relative abundance of Flo1/5 or Flo10 in the cell wall was correlated with the ability of these yeast strains to flocculate. Analysis of whole cell proteomes identified differences in the proteomes of yeast strains and identified the potential for high metabolic diversity. Characterization of the cell wall and whole cell proteomes during fermentation showed high levels of Flo10 in cells that settled early during fermentation. Our data reveal the diversity of the cell wall and global proteomes of brewing yeast, highlighting the potential biochemical diversity present in yeast that can be utilized in the production of fermented beverages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Foods—The Science of Fermented Foods)
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11 pages, 1434 KiB  
Article
Influence of Lysozyme Addition on Hydroxycinnamic Acids and Volatile Phenols during Wine Fermentation
by Stephan Sommer, Pascal Wegmann-Herr, Michael Wacker and Ulrich Fischer
Fermentation 2018, 4(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation4010005 - 21 Jan 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 5158
Abstract
Most yeast and bacteria in wine are able to metabolize hydroxycinnamic acids into volatile phenols via enzyme-mediated decarboxylation. Our trials performed in wine and model systems suggest that lysozyme addition prior to fermentation affects both bacterial activity and the release of hydroxycinnamic acids [...] Read more.
Most yeast and bacteria in wine are able to metabolize hydroxycinnamic acids into volatile phenols via enzyme-mediated decarboxylation. Our trials performed in wine and model systems suggest that lysozyme addition prior to fermentation affects both bacterial activity and the release of hydroxycinnamic acids from their tartrate esters. This increases the potential for volatile phenol formation, as microorganisms can only metabolize free hydroxycinnamates. Wines with delayed malolactic fermentation due to lysozyme addition contained significantly higher concentrations of free hydroxycinnamic acids and elevated levels of volatile phenols in some cases. The reason for this is likely related to the side activity of lysozyme in combination with a detoxification mechanism that only occurs under stressful conditions for the yeast. Experiments in model systems indicate that lysozyme can affect the yeast at a pH higher than usually found in wine by attacking chitin in the bud scars of the cell walls and therefore weakening the cell structure. Free hydroxycinnamates can also affect yeast viability, making an increased release during fermentation problematic for a successful fermentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Foods—The Science of Fermented Foods)
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13 pages, 556 KiB  
Review
Fermented Foods and Beverages in Human Diet and Their Influence on Gut Microbiota and Health
by Nelson Mota de Carvalho, Eduardo M. Costa, Sara Silva, Lígia Pimentel, Tito H. Fernandes and Manuela Estevez Pintado
Fermentation 2018, 4(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation4040090 - 28 Oct 2018
Cited by 59 | Viewed by 17786
Abstract
Dietary changes have accompanied the evolution of humanity and is proven to be fundamental in human evolution and well-being. Nutrition is essential for survival and as a matter of health and equilibrium of the human body. About 1/3 of the human diet is [...] Read more.
Dietary changes have accompanied the evolution of humanity and is proven to be fundamental in human evolution and well-being. Nutrition is essential for survival and as a matter of health and equilibrium of the human body. About 1/3 of the human diet is composed by fermented foods and beverages, which are widely distributed and consumed in different societies around the world, no matter the culture and lifestyle. Fermented foods are derived from the fermentation process of different substrates by microorganisms, and more importantly to humans, by those with beneficial characteristics, due to the positive impact on health. Food is transformed in the gut, gaining new proprieties, and increasing its value to the organism. The effects of fermented foods and beverages can be assessed by its influence at the gut microbiota level. Recent studies show the major importance of the gut microbiota role in modulating the organism homeostasis and homeorhesis. More crosslinks between health, gut microbiota and diet are being established especially in the gut–brain axis field. Therefore, the benefits of diet, in particularly of fermented foods and beverages, should be studied and pursued in order to promote a good health status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Foods—The Science of Fermented Foods)
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