Plant-Based Fermented Foods and Civilization Diseases

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2022) | Viewed by 21913

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Center of Bioimmobilisation and Innovative Packaging Materials, Faculty of Food Sciences and Fisheries, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, 71-270 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: functional foods; plant-based foods; dairy alternatives; biotransformation; by-products valorization; fermented products; bioactivity; probiotics; biopolymers; food microbiology; lactic acid bacteria
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Guest Editor
Department of Diagnostic Immunology, Chair of Microbiology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, Pomeranian Medical University, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: natural compounds; immune response; infectious diseases; antibacterial activity; Staphylococcus aureus
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants and their parts are some of the most important sources of nutrients, and have been widely investigated due to their health-promoting potential. They provide proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, mineral elements, and bioactive compounds that are essential for the maintenance of body health. The role of plant-based foods is an intensively discussed issue considering the rapid increase in chronic diseases (also called civilization diseases, including cardiovascular disease; diabetes; obesity; hypertension; cancer; oxidative stress; as well as inflammatory, gastrointestinal, and neurodegenerative disorders) due to lifestyle changes as well as dietary habits in today’s society. The use of fermentation and selected starters, such as lactic acid bacteria and yeasts (including probiotic strains), has long been considered an excellent tool to improve the nutritional/functional characteristics of foods. It is estimated that fermented foods contribute to about one-third of the diet worldwide and commercially produced fermented foods are marketed globally. During fermentation processes, microbial growth and metabolism as well as the interaction with the plant matrices result in the production of a diversity of metabolites and the biotransformation of phytochemicals. Recently, it has been reported that consuming more fermented plant-based foods (considered as functional foods) may increase microbiome diversity and enhance the immune system, and may impact on the pathogenesis of different chronic diseases, highlighting their high functional value and positive effect on human health. Thus, research on the biological functions of plant-based fermented foods and their applications needs to be expanded into new areas. In this Special Issue, we kindly invite you to submit original research and review articles on the health benefits of plant-based fermented foods, including in vivo/vitro experiments and clinical studies on the antioxidant, antimicrobial, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anticancer, and other biological activities as well as descriptions of their mechanisms.

Dr. Łukasz Łopusiewicz
Dr. Paweł Kwiatkowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plant-based fermented foods
  • Functional foods
  • Plants fermentation
  • Biological activity
  • Health-promoting properties
  • Probiotics
  • Lactic acid bacteria
  • Yeast
  • Civilization diseases
  • Chronic diseases

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 2384 KiB  
Article
Lactic Fermentation of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) to Enhance the Antioxidant and Antiproliferative Activities
by Daniela Iga-Buitrón, Edgar Torres-Maravilla, Luis G. Bermúdez-Humaran, Juan A. Ascacio-Valdes, Raúl Rodríguez-Herrera, Cristóbal N. Aguilar and Adriana C. Flores-Gallegos
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020122 - 27 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2112
Abstract
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for centuries to produce fermented foods. Cruciferous vegetables contain large amounts of health-promoting compounds such as glucosinolates (GLSs) and phenolics. GLSs and phenolics have been linked to antioxidant, anticancer, and immunosuppressive effects. However, it has been [...] Read more.
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for centuries to produce fermented foods. Cruciferous vegetables contain large amounts of health-promoting compounds such as glucosinolates (GLSs) and phenolics. GLSs and phenolics have been linked to antioxidant, anticancer, and immunosuppressive effects. However, it has been reported that some LAB strains are able to metabolize and enhance the activities and amounts of biomolecules through decarboxylation and/or reduction activities, with positive impacts on human diet and colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention. In the present work, the bioprocessing of broccoli by lactic fermentation was evaluated to produce a functional food using both spontaneous and induced fermentation (Levilactobacillus brevis and Lactococcus lactis as starter co-culture). Changes in the proximal composition, GLSs, and phenolic content as well as the antioxidant, antiproliferative, and immunosuppressive effect of the fermented product were evaluated in in vitro cellular models to validate their potential in CRC chemoprevention. The results demonstrated that fermented broccoli extracts increased the antioxidant activity in Caco2 cells and inhibited the proliferation of HT29 and HT116 cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner, with the best results on day 6 at a concentration of 600 µg/mL. Our findings also provide evidence that fermented broccoli could have an anti-inflammatory effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Fermented Foods and Civilization Diseases)
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15 pages, 1626 KiB  
Article
Fermented Plant Beverages Stabilized with Microemulsion: Confirmation of Probiotic Properties and Antioxidant Activity
by Svetlana Merenkova, Oksana Zinina and Irina Potoroko
Fermentation 2022, 8(12), 723; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8120723 - 10 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1591
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to experimentally confirm the probiotic properties and antioxidant activity of plant fermented beverages stabilized with microemulsion. The object of the study were beverages obtained from hemp seeds and fermented with Bifidobacterium longum. To stabilize the plant [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to experimentally confirm the probiotic properties and antioxidant activity of plant fermented beverages stabilized with microemulsion. The object of the study were beverages obtained from hemp seeds and fermented with Bifidobacterium longum. To stabilize the plant base, the microemulsion with a bioactive substance (curcumin) was introduced with simultaneous ultrasound treatment. A significant increase in the viscosity of beverages with microcellulose-stabilized microemulsion was noted. Non-fermented plant beverages are characterized by their smaller diameter and distribution of particles in the micro-range, from 0.81 to 6.5 µm. When Twin-stabilized microemulsion was added to beverages, a monodisperse distribution of particles sufficiently small in diameter was observed. A significant increase of 29.4–33.6% in the antioxidant activity of plant beverages stabilized by ME with curcumin was established. A maximum concentration of flavonoids was noted in non-fermented plant beverages containing microemulsion. The results of this study proved the possibility of obtaining fermented plant beverages with identified probiotic and antioxidant properties. A positive effect of stabilizing with a microemulsion loaded with biologically active components on the development of probiotic microorganism cultures in the system of fermented plant products and the formation of their antioxidant activity was established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Fermented Foods and Civilization Diseases)
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16 pages, 622 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Yogurt and Kefir Starter Cultures on Bioactivity of Fermented Industrial By-Product from Cannabis sativa Production—Hemp Press Cake
by Łukasz Łopusiewicz, Katarzyna Waszkowiak, Katarzyna Polanowska, Beata Mikołajczak, Natalia Śmietana, Agnieszka Hrebień-Filisińska, Joanna Sadowska, Kinga Mazurkiewicz-Zapałowicz and Emilia Drozłowska
Fermentation 2022, 8(10), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8100490 - 28 Sep 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4111
Abstract
Cannabis sativa (hemp) is a plant considered to be abundant in bioactive compounds. The increasing production of hemp oil is leaving considerable amounts of hemp press cakes (HPC), which have not been sufficiently managed so far. One of the directions of development of [...] Read more.
Cannabis sativa (hemp) is a plant considered to be abundant in bioactive compounds. The increasing production of hemp oil is leaving considerable amounts of hemp press cakes (HPC), which have not been sufficiently managed so far. One of the directions of development of plant-based food is the use of by-products of the agri-food industry in accordance with the idea of zero waste and the circular economy, so the purpose of this study was to determine the possibility of HPC fermentation using yogurt and kefir cultures and to determine the effect of the type of starter on the properties of the products. In the present study, starter cultures of yogurt (YO 122) and kefir (commercial grains) were used for HPC fermentation. Changes in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast population, pH, acidity, the content of bioactive compounds by spectrophotometric methods (proteins, amino acids, polyphenols, flavonoids, reducing sugars) and antioxidant activity (DDPH, ABTS, FRAP and reducing power) were determined. The results showed that it was possible to develop high-value beverages based on HPC with high fermentation efficiency: survivability of LAB and yeast (>106 CFU/g) and acidification (pH in a range of 4.82–6.36 and 5.34–6.49 for yogurt and kefir culture, respectively). Moreover, the stability of hemp protein, with its variable free amino acid composition, antioxidant potential and presented changes in polyphenolic content, was observed during storage. The presented results show a new way to manage HPC as an oil industry residue by using it as a raw material for the development of a bioactive food product and illustrate the relationship between applied starter culture, the direction of fermentation and changes in the content of bioactive compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Fermented Foods and Civilization Diseases)
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16 pages, 35052 KiB  
Article
Microbial Composition of a Traditional Fermented Wheat Preparation—Nishasta and Its Role in the Amelioration of Retinoic Acid-Induced Osteoporosis in Rats
by Aayeena Altaf, Naila H. Alkefai, Bibhu Prasad Panda, Zakiya Usmani, Saima Amin and Showkat R. Mir
Fermentation 2022, 8(4), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8040182 - 12 Apr 2022
Viewed by 5270
Abstract
Fermented foods have a long history of human use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial composition of a traditional fermented wheat preparation—Nishasta— and to explore its effect in retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis in Wistar rats. The sample was suspended in [...] Read more.
Fermented foods have a long history of human use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial composition of a traditional fermented wheat preparation—Nishasta— and to explore its effect in retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis in Wistar rats. The sample was suspended in sterile water (10% w/v), mixed thoroughly, filtered, and gradually diluted. Aliquots of dilutions were cultured in MRS (DeMan–Rogosa–Sharpe) medium, and colonies with similar morphologies were subjected to DNA extraction. The 16S rRNA gene of the isolates was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, checked by agarose gel electrophoresis, and finally identified by sequencing. Anti-osteoporosis screening of Nishasta was carried out in female Wistar rats using retinoic acid as an inducer (70 mg/kg, p.o. once a day for 14 days). Its effect on bone health parameters was determined. The bone metabolism markers such as hydroxyproline (HOP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were evaluated. The results of microbial characterization revealed the presence of ten clones of Lactobacillus plantarum in the fermented preparation with L. plantarum NF3 as the predominant strain. The average microbial count was 2.4 × 103 CFU/g. Retinoic acid administration led to a marked disorder of various bone health markers in rats. It also increased the levels of urine calcium and phosphorus, indicating increased bone destruction. Treatment with fermented wheat (at 200, 100, and 50 mg/kg doses, p.o. daily for 42 days after the induction of osteoporosis) improved bone mineral density in a dose-dependent manner. It also improved the bone microstructure and reduced the levels of ALP, TRACP, and HOP. Micro-CT revealed that it reduced trabecular separation and increased the percent bone volume, trabecular numbers, trabecular thickness, and bone mineral density in the rats. The results showed that the fermented wheat promoted bone formation and prevented bone resorption. Our findings clearly established the effectiveness of Nishasta against osteoporosis in Wistar rats that can be partly attributed to the improved gut calcium absorption and microbiota composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Fermented Foods and Civilization Diseases)
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10 pages, 1606 KiB  
Article
Beneficial Effects of Jujube Juice Fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum NXU19009 on Acute Alcoholic Liver Injury in Mice
by Huiyan Liu, Shihua Xin, Ranran Lu, Haitian Fang, Xiaoping Yang and Yun Ping Neo
Fermentation 2022, 8(2), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8020054 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2828
Abstract
Red jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) is an important fruit that has the concomitant function of both medicine and food. It has been proven to be rich in various bioactive components. In the present study, jujube juice was fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum NXU19009 [...] Read more.
Red jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) is an important fruit that has the concomitant function of both medicine and food. It has been proven to be rich in various bioactive components. In the present study, jujube juice was fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum NXU19009 to enhance the flavor and nutritional benefits. Its potential for the prevention and treatment of acute alcohol induced-liver injury in mice was examined in this study. The results showed that the administration of the fermented jujube juice along with alcohol significantly decreased (p < 0.01) the liver indices, as well as the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), total triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and liver malondialdehyde (MDA) in the serum. In contrast, the levels of liver superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) in mice administered with fermented jujube juice were found to increase significantly (p < 0.01). Furthermore, the administration of fermented jujube juice in mice was found to alter their intestinal microbiota and an improvement was observed based on the results obtained in the histopathology examination. Therefore, Jujube juice fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum NXU19009 protects against liver injury and may prove to be an effective supplement to attenuate acute alcoholic liver injury. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Fermented Foods and Civilization Diseases)
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Review

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16 pages, 979 KiB  
Review
Fermented Black Tea and Its Relationship with Gut Microbiota and Obesity: A Mini Review
by Nurul Farhana Nasir, Nurul Elyani Mohamad and Noorjahan Banu Alitheen
Fermentation 2022, 8(11), 603; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8110603 - 4 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4833
Abstract
Fermentation is one of the world’s oldest techniques for food preservation, nutrient enhancement, and alcohol manufacturing. During fermentation, carbohydrates such as glucose and starch are converted into other molecules, such as alcohol and acid, anaerobically through enzymatic action while generating energy for the [...] Read more.
Fermentation is one of the world’s oldest techniques for food preservation, nutrient enhancement, and alcohol manufacturing. During fermentation, carbohydrates such as glucose and starch are converted into other molecules, such as alcohol and acid, anaerobically through enzymatic action while generating energy for the microorganism or cells involved. Black tea is among the most popular fermented beverages; it is made from the dried tea leaves of the evergreen shrub plant known as Camellia sinensis. The adequate consumption of black tea is beneficial to health as it contains high levels of flavanols, also known as catechins, which act as effective antioxidants and are responsible for protecting the body against the development of illnesses, such as inflammation, diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and obesity. The prevalence of obesity is a severe public health concern associated with the incidence of various serious diseases and is now increasing, including in Malaysia. Advances in ‘omic’ research have allowed researchers to identify the pivotal role of the gut microbiota in the development of obesity. This review explores fermented black tea and its correlation with the regulation of the gut microbiota and obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Fermented Foods and Civilization Diseases)
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