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Recent Advances in Sustainable Buildings: Space Heating, Space Cooling and Lighting

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "G: Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020) | Viewed by 9065

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Engineering and the Built Environment, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
Interests: energy; sustainable energy; solar energy; hydrogen technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute of Sustainable Building Design, School of Energy Geoscience Infrastructure and Society, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
Interests: solar PV systems; bifacial PV performance; ground albedo enhancement; sustainable buildings; behaviour and attitude of users towards energy consumption
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Engineering Construction and Project Management, School of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: renewable energies; energy sustainability; climate change; urban planning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Energy from fossil fuels (oil, gas, and coal) has been identified as the major cause of the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, a leading contributor to climate change. Energy efficiency is seen as the cheapest, fastest and cleanest energy resource that can be used in response to the growing concerns about climate change.

British Petroleum (BP) has indicated that the global demand for oil will grow by around 30% between 2007 and 2035, while consumption of coal and natural gas will grow by 50%. Moreover, unless drastic measures are taken to change current consumption patterns, the International Energy Agency predicts that CO2 emissions from energy consumption will double by 2050.

At present, 80% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions come from cities. By 2050, it is predicted that 70% of the world’s population will live in urban areas. There is a proposal that includes cities as part of the solution to combat the effects of climate change and to promote sustainable development.

In the context of energy saving, the building sector has increasingly attracted worldwide attention. In 2010, buildings represented 32% of global final energy demand, of which 24% was for residential buildings and 8% for commercial buildings. In residential buildings, space heating accounted for 32% of the total global consumption, followed by 29% for cooking, 24% for water heating, 9% for appliances, 4% for lighting and 2% for cooling. In commercial buildings, space heating accounted for 33% of the total global consumption, followed by 16% for lighting, 12% for water heating, 7% for cooling and 32% for other equipment.

Regarding global trends in energy consumption, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has reported that a significant increase is expected in the global demand for heating and cooling energy until 2050; with an increase of 179% and 183% from 2010 levels in residential and commercial buildings, respectively. This concern has led to a number of studies conducted worldwide to improve building energy efficiency in areas such as control of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) installations, and lighting systems.

This edition of the Energies journal aims to address the challenge of reducing emissions from the residential sector by minimizing the need to use energy in buildings (heating, cooling and lighting) through more energy efficient measures, the use of renewable energy sources, and other technologies in order to meet minimum energy requirements.

Prof. Dr. Tariq Muneer
Dr. Mehreen Saleem Gul
Prof. Dr. Eulalia Jadraque Gago
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy saving
  • building
  • heating, ventilation and air conditioning
  • energy efficient
  • energy requirements

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 8824 KiB  
Article
Effect of Land Use/Cover Changes on Urban Cool Island Phenomenon in Seville, Spain
by Eulalia Jadraque Gago, Saioa Etxebarria Berrizbeitia, Rosalía Pacheco Torres and Tariq Muneer
Energies 2020, 13(12), 3040; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13123040 - 12 Jun 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2598
Abstract
This paper analyses Seville’s surface urban heat island (SUHI) phenomenon, comparing spatial and temporal patterns of land surface temperature (LST) during July 1987, 2000 and 2017. Landsat data captured throughout three July months were analyzed for the different years, techniques of geographic information [...] Read more.
This paper analyses Seville’s surface urban heat island (SUHI) phenomenon, comparing spatial and temporal patterns of land surface temperature (LST) during July 1987, 2000 and 2017. Landsat data captured throughout three July months were analyzed for the different years, techniques of geographic information systems, ecological variables and geospatial approaches and used to carry out the analysis. The results indicate that from 1987 to 2017, the averaged LST has increased by 9.1 °C in the studied area. The urban areas are colder than their surroundings, suggesting the role of baresoil and cultivated land in the reversal of the SUHI phenomenon. The results show that a fraction of green space has a high unstandardized coefficient (β) through the three time periods. A decreasing trend is also observed in the standardized β “fraction of impervious surface” in the three time periods. The linear regression analysis shows a negative relationship of mean LST with impervious surface fraction due to the presence of shadows projected by buildings, and a positive relationship with green space fraction caused by the influence of baresoil and cultivated land that inverts the LST behavior pattern. The study concludes that there is a need to implement SUHI mitigation strategies during the initial phases of engineering projects where the origin of this problem can be acted upon, since the process of creating streets and public space offers a valuable opportunity to restore the environmental quality and diminish the effects generated by climate change. Full article
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20 pages, 11359 KiB  
Article
Development of a Thermal Environment Analysis Method for a Dwelling Containing a Colonnade Space through Coupled Energy Simulation and Computational Fluid Dynamics
by Tatsuhiro Yamamoto, Akihito Ozaki and Myonghyang Lee
Energies 2019, 12(13), 2560; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12132560 - 3 Jul 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2410
Abstract
In building design, several approaches have been proposed for coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and energy simulation (ES) to perform analyses of thermal environments. The unsteady analysis of thermal environments within buildings containing offices and colonnade spaces is difficult to perform using an [...] Read more.
In building design, several approaches have been proposed for coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and energy simulation (ES) to perform analyses of thermal environments. The unsteady analysis of thermal environments within buildings containing offices and colonnade spaces is difficult to perform using an ES that represents the space with a single mass point, owing to excessive predictive heat loss; therefore, CFD has typically been used instead. Although it is possible to divide the space into zones using ES, it leads to excessive predicted heat loss and the prediction of heat movement due to the influence of strong air currents, such as those associated with air conditioners. This behavior is observed because these zones are not detailed mesh divisions. To solve these problems, we proposed a method for calculating the ratio of heat contribution to zones that were pre-divided using CFD followed by the distribution of the total thermal load calculated by ES. In this study, we proposed a method for coupling ES and CFD, which enabled the unsteady analysis of a thermal environment in a large space and verified its accuracy. Full article
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23 pages, 2706 KiB  
Review
Empirical Models for the Estimation of Solar Sky-Diffuse Radiation. A Review and Experimental Analysis
by Saioa Etxebarria Berrizbeitia, Eulalia Jadraque Gago and Tariq Muneer
Energies 2020, 13(3), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13030701 - 6 Feb 2020
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 3325
Abstract
Accurate solar radiation data are essential for the development of solar energy application systems. The limited availability of solar radiation data, and especially diffuse irradiance values, makes it vital to develop models to estimate these data. The development of estimation models has been [...] Read more.
Accurate solar radiation data are essential for the development of solar energy application systems. The limited availability of solar radiation data, and especially diffuse irradiance values, makes it vital to develop models to estimate these data. The development of estimation models has been the objective of many studies. This paper presents an extended review of the diffuse ratio (k) vs. clearness index (kt) annual, monthly, daily, and hourly frequency regression models. It is however interesting to note that there is a dearth of such knowledge for diffuse ratio–clearness index regressions that are based on averaged data. Monthly-averaged daily global irradiation data are now easily available from the NASA website for any global location. Using existing models, it is possible to decompose the daily to averaged-hourly global irradiation values. The missing link so far has been hourly averaged diffuse irradiation. This article presents regression equations which could be used to estimate that information. For this purpose, hourly global and diffuse irradiation data was pooled from 19 different locations to obtain three latitude-dependent regression models relating the monthly-averaged hourly diffuse ratio ( k ¯ ) to the clearness index ( k t ¯ ). The results show a high relationship between both variables. These regression equations could be used to estimate the averaged diffuse irradiation values from averaged global irradiation values, which are more easily available. Full article
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