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A Themed Issue Dedicated to Professor Luisa F. Cabeza

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "J: Thermal Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 13273

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: energy storage; food processing; biofuel
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 14-8400637, Israel
Interests: heat transfer; two-phase systems; mechanics of aerosols; adhesion of solids

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Energies is dedicated to Professor Luisa F. Cabeza (born on May 27, 1967, Barcelona, Spain), full professor since 2006 at the University of Lleida, Spain. She graduated with a Chemical Engineering degree in 1992 and Industrial Engineering in 1993 from the Universitat Ramon Llull (Barcelona, Spain). She has received an MBA degree in 1995 and PhD degree in 1996 from the same university. After a post-doctorate appointment at the USDA-ARS-ERRC lab in Philadelphia, USA, she joined University of Lleida in 1999, where she has been the head of GREiA research group. She has devoted the last 22 years in developing new materials and systems for thermal energy storage (TES) in different applications. She was a member of the Executive Committee of the Storage Program of the International Energy Agency (ECES IA—IEA) and she has contributed to the SREEN, Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) reports of the IPCC. At present, she is Coordinating Lead Author (CLA) of the Buildings chapter of the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) preparation of the IPCC. Prof. Luisa F. Cabeza has been the Spanish expert in the Challenge 3—Energy of the H2020 programme from 2014 to 2020. She has authored more than 450 peer-reviewed research papers, edited more than 10 books, and participated in a number of international conferences, including a number of invited keynote talks. She is a member of the editorial board of relevant peer-reviewed journals in the field of energy systems and has been acting as an external reviewer for more than 15 years. During her career, she was the inventor behind seven patents on TES out-licensed to national and international industrial partners and actually commercialized.  Prof. Luisa F. Cabeza has coordinated or led eight national projects on TES, and four EU projects, and she has participated as partner in other eight EU projects.

We plan to organize a Special Issue honoring Prof. Luisa F. Cabeza’s distinguished scientific career over the past 25 years. This Special Issue will consist of communications, original research articles, and review articles covering different aspects related to all TES technologies, including but not limited to:

  • Advanced TES materials;
  • Novel TES systems and applications;
  • Passive and active TES integrated into buildings;
  • Integration of TES into smart energy systems and distributed generation;
  • Improvement of energy demand flexibility through TES;
  • Economic and techno-economic analysis of TES systems;
  • Environmental analysis and impact assessment of TES.

Prof. Dr. Mohammed Mehdi Farid
Prof. Dr. Gennady Ziskind
Dr. Emiliano Borri
Dr. Gabriel Zsembinszki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Thermal energy storage
  • Energy systems
  • Energy efficiency
  • Economic analysis
  • Techno-economic analysis
  • Environmental impact.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 4945 KiB  
Article
Development and Experimental Characterization of an Innovative Tank-in-Tank Hybrid Sensible–Latent Thermal Energy Storage System
by Andrea Frazzica, Valeria Palomba and Angelo Freni
Energies 2023, 16(4), 1875; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16041875 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1323
Abstract
This study focuses on the development and testing under lab-controlled conditions of a hybrid sensible–latent thermal energy storage (TES) system for domestic hot water (DHW) provision in residential buildings. The TES system’s design is based, for the first time in the literature, on [...] Read more.
This study focuses on the development and testing under lab-controlled conditions of a hybrid sensible–latent thermal energy storage (TES) system for domestic hot water (DHW) provision in residential buildings. The TES system’s design is based, for the first time in the literature, on a commercial tank-in-tank architecture integrating a macro-encapsulated commercial phase change material (PCM) inside the external tank to guarantee the safe provision of DHW and increase overall energy storage density at a reasonable cost. The PCM is a salt hydrate with a nominal melting temperature of 58 °C. The overall tank-in-tank TES volume is about 540 dm3. Almost one tenth of this volume is occupied by the PCM macro-capsules. The developed TES system was comparatively tested against the same configuration operated as a sensible TES. The obtained results showed the ability of the PCM to increase the thermal inertia inside the external tank, thus guaranteeing the quite stable provision of heat to the integral DHW tank during the stand-by periods. This effect was confirmed by the PCM’s ability to achieve an energy storage capacity up to 16% higher than the reference sensible TES system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Themed Issue Dedicated to Professor Luisa F. Cabeza)
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12 pages, 2986 KiB  
Article
Key Challenges for High Temperature Thermal Energy Storage in Concrete—First Steps towards a Novel Storage Design
by Luisa F. Cabeza, David Vérez, Gabriel Zsembinszki, Emiliano Borri and Cristina Prieto
Energies 2022, 15(13), 4544; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15134544 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2468
Abstract
Thermal energy storage (TES) allows the existing mismatch between supply and demand in energy systems to be overcome. Considering temperatures above 150 °C, there are major potential benefits for applications, such as process heat and electricity production, where TES coupled with concentrating solar [...] Read more.
Thermal energy storage (TES) allows the existing mismatch between supply and demand in energy systems to be overcome. Considering temperatures above 150 °C, there are major potential benefits for applications, such as process heat and electricity production, where TES coupled with concentrating solar power (CSP) plants can increase the penetration of renewable energies. To this end, this paper performs a critical analysis of the literature on the current and most promising concrete energy storage technologies, identifying five challenges that must be overcome for the successful exploitation of this technology. With these five challenges in mind, this paper proposes an approach that uses a new modular design of concrete-based TES. A preliminary study of the feasibility of the proposed system was performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques, showing promising results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Themed Issue Dedicated to Professor Luisa F. Cabeza)
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19 pages, 4137 KiB  
Article
A Rapid Method for Low Temperature Microencapsulation of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) Using a Coiled Tube Ultraviolet Reactor
by Jawaad A. Ansari, Refat Al-Shannaq, Jamal Kurdi, Shaheen A. Al-Muhtaseb, Charles A. Ikutegbe and Mohammed M. Farid
Energies 2021, 14(23), 7867; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14237867 - 24 Nov 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2255
Abstract
Microencapsulation of phase change materials (PCMs) remain a suitable option within building materials, as they contribute to the thermal mass and provide an energy buffer, an added benefit. This paper presents a novel method for the rapid fabrication of microencapsulated phase change materials [...] Read more.
Microencapsulation of phase change materials (PCMs) remain a suitable option within building materials, as they contribute to the thermal mass and provide an energy buffer, an added benefit. This paper presents a novel method for the rapid fabrication of microencapsulated phase change materials (PCMs) at ambient conditions in a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) coiled tube ultraviolet (UV) reactor. The objective of this study was to optimize key parameters such as the product yield and quality of the as-prepared microcapsules. Rubitherm® RT-21™ PCM was microencapsulated within shells of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) through a suspension emulsion polymerization approach, where the crosslinking of polymers was driven by UV radiations with an appropriate photoinitiator. The characteristics of the resulting PCM microcapsules were found to be affected by the volumetric flow rate of the emulsion inside the coiled tube reactor. Higher volumetric flow rates led to higher PCM contents and higher microencapsulation efficiency, resulting in an average particle size of 6.5 µm. Furthermore, the effect of curing time on the PCM microcapsule properties was investigated. The optimum encapsulation yield, conversion, efficiency and PCM content were observed after 10 min of polymerization time. The thermal analysis indicated that the developed process had an efficiency of 85.8%, and the capsules were characterized with excellent thermal properties. Compared to the conventional thermal microencapsulation processes, the use of a coiled tube UV reactor with an appropriate photoinitiator enables the encapsulation of heat-sensitive PCMs at ambient conditions, and reduces the microencapsulation time dramatically. As a result, this novel microencapsulation approach can lead to a wider scope of PCM encapsulation and enable rapid, continuous and potentially large-scale industrial production of PCM microcapsules with low energy consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Themed Issue Dedicated to Professor Luisa F. Cabeza)
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Review

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46 pages, 30779 KiB  
Review
Latent Heat Storage Systems for Thermal Management of Electric Vehicle Batteries: Thermal Performance Enhancement and Modulation of the Phase Transition Process Dynamics: A Literature Review
by Bogdan Diaconu, Mihai Cruceru, Lucica Anghelescu, Cristinel Racoceanu, Cristinel Popescu, Marian Ionescu and Adriana Tudorache
Energies 2023, 16(6), 2745; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16062745 - 15 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2361
Abstract
Electric vehicles battery systems (EVBS) are subject to complex charging/discharging processes that produce various amount of stress and cause significant temperature fluctuations. Due to the variable heat generation regimes, latent heat storage systems that can absorb significant amounts of thermal energy with little [...] Read more.
Electric vehicles battery systems (EVBS) are subject to complex charging/discharging processes that produce various amount of stress and cause significant temperature fluctuations. Due to the variable heat generation regimes, latent heat storage systems that can absorb significant amounts of thermal energy with little temperature variation are an interesting thermal management solution. A major drawback of organic phase change materials is their low thermal conductivity, which limits the material charging/discharging capacity. This review paper covers recent studies on thermal performance enhancement of PCM thermal management for electric vehicles batteries. A special focus is placed on the constraints related to electric vehicles battery systems, such as mass/volume minimization, integration with other battery thermal management systems, operational temperature range, adaptability to extreme regimes and modulation of the melting/solidification behavior. The main research outcomes are as follows: quantitative/comparative assessment of common enhancement technique in terms of performance; approaches to deal with special constraints related to EVBS from the thermal control point of view. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Themed Issue Dedicated to Professor Luisa F. Cabeza)
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17 pages, 3107 KiB  
Review
Review on the Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage Used in Building Applications
by Isye Hayatina, Amar Auckaili and Mohammed Farid
Energies 2023, 16(3), 1170; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16031170 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3044
Abstract
To reduce building sector CO2 emissions, integrating renewable energy and thermal energy storage (TES) into building design is crucial. TES provides a way of storing thermal energy during high renewable energy production for use later during peak energy demand in buildings. The [...] Read more.
To reduce building sector CO2 emissions, integrating renewable energy and thermal energy storage (TES) into building design is crucial. TES provides a way of storing thermal energy during high renewable energy production for use later during peak energy demand in buildings. The type of thermal energy stored in TES can be divided into three categories: sensible, latent, and sorption/chemical. Unlike sensible TES, latent TES and sorption/chemical TES have not been widely applied; however, they have the advantage of a higher energy density, making them effective for building applications. Most TES research focuses on technical design and rarely addresses its environmental, social, and cost impact. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an internationally standardized method for evaluating the environmental impacts of any process. Life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA) is an expansion of LCA, including economic and social sustainability assessments. This paper aims to provide a literature review of the LCA and LCSA of TES, specifically for building applications. Concerning the low technology readiness level (TRL) of several TES systems, the challenges and benefits of conducting LCA for these systems are highlighted. Furthermore, based on published studies on emerging technologies for LCA, a suggested procedure to carry out the LCA of TES with low TRL is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Themed Issue Dedicated to Professor Luisa F. Cabeza)
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