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Advances in Coal, Biomass and Biowaste Processing Technology

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A4: Bio-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2018) | Viewed by 14308

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarkow 1, 40-166 Katowice, Poland
Interests: energy environmental science; thermochemical conversion of various fuels; biomass/biowaste/ sewadge sludge; sustainable development; energy technologies in particular coal and biomass gasification/co-gasification; combustion/co-combustion; cogeneration; renewable energy; hydrogen technologies; sustainable energy systems; environmental impact of industrial systems; energy storage; carbon dioxide capture; storage and chemical utilization (CCS and CCU); advanced methods of data mining (chemometrics); work health and safety culture in mining; risk assessment and strata monitoring
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of new, innovative, “green” visions of fossil fuels-based energy systems is becoming one of the most important targets of global energy security policy. The increasing carbon dioxide emissions involved in addressing the increasing energy demand is one of the major environmental concerns of the contemporary coal-based energy sector. Wider use of biomass and biowaste in power generation may contribute to diversification of the world energy supplies, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Nothwistanding the particular emphasis put on the use of renewables in the development of sustaibnable energy systems, coal will still remain the major energy resource because of its abundance, wide geographic distribution and price competitiveness according to the forecasts of energy use structure by 2050.

This Special Issue is, therefore, devoted to the current challenges and latest developments in widely underestood thermochemical conversion of coal, biomass and biowaste (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, liquefaction) to different products (heat, power, hydrogen, substitute natural gas, methanol, liquid fuels, etc.). Various apsects of thermochemical utilization of coal for energy purposes, ranging from technological, through process integration to economic and environmantal are the main thematic areas covered by this Special Issue.

Prof. Adam Smoliński
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coal, biomass, biowaste
  • gasification, co-gasification
  • combustion, co-combustion
  • pyrolisis
  • liqufication
  • thermochemical utylization of coal/biomass/biowaste
  • carbon dioxide emission reduction
  • green energy
  • clean coal technologies
  • CCS, CCU

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 3937 KiB  
Article
Techno-Economic Analysis of a Small-Scale Biomass-to-Energy BFB Gasification-Based System
by Andrea Porcu, Stefano Sollai, Davide Marotto, Mauro Mureddu, Francesca Ferrara and Alberto Pettinau
Energies 2019, 12(3), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12030494 - 04 Feb 2019
Cited by 50 | Viewed by 6974
Abstract
In order to limit global warming to around 1.5–2.0 °C by the end of the 21st century, there is the need to drastically limit the emissions of CO2. This goal can be pursued by promoting the diffusion of advanced technologies for [...] Read more.
In order to limit global warming to around 1.5–2.0 °C by the end of the 21st century, there is the need to drastically limit the emissions of CO2. This goal can be pursued by promoting the diffusion of advanced technologies for power generation from renewable energy sources. In this field, biomass can play a very important role since, differently from solar and wind, it can be considered a programmable source. This paper reports a techno-economic analysis on the possible commercial application of gasification technologies for small-scale (2 MWe) power generation from biomass. The analysis is based on the preliminary experimental performance of a 500 kWth pilot-scale air-blown bubbling fluidized-bed (BFB) gasification plant, recently installed at the Sotacarbo Research Centre (Italy) and commissioned in December 2017. The analysis confirms that air-blown BFB biomass gasification can be profitable for the applications with low-cost biomass, such as agricultural waste, with a net present value up to about 6 M€ as long as the biomass is provided for free; on the contrary, the technology is not competitive for high-quality biomass (wood chips, as those used for the preliminary experimental tests). In parallel, an analysis of the financial risk was carried out, in order to estimate the probability of a profitable investment if a variation of the key financial parameters occurs. In particular, the analysis shows a probability of 90% of a NPV at 15 years between 1.4 and 5.1 M€ and an IRR between 11.6% and 23.7%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Coal, Biomass and Biowaste Processing Technology)
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12 pages, 1344 KiB  
Article
Utilization of Carbon Dioxide in Coal Gasification—An Experimental Study
by Janusz Zdeb, Natalia Howaniec and Adam Smoliński
Energies 2019, 12(1), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12010140 - 01 Jan 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3838
Abstract
Utilization of coal in the current energy sector requires implementation of highly-efficient technologies to meet the dual targets of increased energy-efficiency and reduced carbon footprint. Efforts are being made to develop gasification systems with lower unit emissions of carbon dioxide and other contaminants, [...] Read more.
Utilization of coal in the current energy sector requires implementation of highly-efficient technologies to meet the dual targets of increased energy-efficiency and reduced carbon footprint. Efforts are being made to develop gasification systems with lower unit emissions of carbon dioxide and other contaminants, capable of handling various feedstocks and flexible in terms of products generated (synthesis gas, hydrogen, heat and electricity). The utilization of captured carbon dioxide and waste heat in industrial processes are considered to further contribute to the advancements in energy-efficient and low-emission technological solutions. This paper presents the experimental results on the incorporation of carbon dioxide into the valorization cycle as a reactant in coal gasification. Tests were performed on a laboratory scale moving bed gasifier using three system configurations with various simulated waste heat utilization scenarios. The temperature range covered 700, 800 and 900 °C and the gasification agents used were carbon dioxide, oxygen and the mixture of 30 vol.% carbon dioxide in oxygen. The combined effect of the process parameters applied on the efficiency of coal processing in terms of the gas yields, composition and calorific value was studied and the experimental data were explored using Principal Component Analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Coal, Biomass and Biowaste Processing Technology)
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17 pages, 1650 KiB  
Article
Techno-Economic Evaluations of Copper-Based Chemical Looping Air Separation System for Oxy-Combustion and Gasification Power Plants with Carbon Capture
by Calin-Cristian Cormos
Energies 2018, 11(11), 3095; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11113095 - 09 Nov 2018
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3037
Abstract
Energy and economic penalties for CO2 capture are the main challenges in front of the carbon capture technologies. Chemical Looping Air Separation (CLAS) represents a potential solution for energy and cost-efficient oxygen production in comparison to the cryogenic method. This work is [...] Read more.
Energy and economic penalties for CO2 capture are the main challenges in front of the carbon capture technologies. Chemical Looping Air Separation (CLAS) represents a potential solution for energy and cost-efficient oxygen production in comparison to the cryogenic method. This work is assessing the key techno-economic performances of a CLAS system using copper oxide as oxygen carrier integrated in coal and lignite-based oxy-combustion and gasification power plants. For comparison, similar combustion and gasification power plants using cryogenic air separation with and without carbon capture were considered as benchmark cases. The assessments were focused on large scale power plants with 350–500 MW net electricity output and 90% CO2 capture rate. As the results show, the utilization of CLAS system in coal and lignite-based oxy-combustion and gasification power plants is improving the key techno-economic indicators e.g., increasing the energy efficiency by about 5–10%, reduction of specific capital investments by about 12–18%, lower cost of electricity by about 8–11% as well as lower CO2 avoidance cost by about 17–27%. The highest techno-economic improvements being noticed for oxy-combustion cases since these plants are using more oxygen than gasification plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Coal, Biomass and Biowaste Processing Technology)
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