Multiple Dimensions of Curriculum

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Curriculum and Instruction".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2023) | Viewed by 5425

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
Interests: curriculum and instruction; gifted and talented education; early childhood education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Curriculum has been considered the mainstay of planning and implementing teaching and learning processes; however, it is often an elusive element in discussions and decisions among educators regarding to how and why “the curriculum” has been developed and designed. As contemporary national and local educational issues emerge, there also is a parallel need to respond to the theoretical constructs, formats, and goals of the curriculum and its impact for our students and the disciplines the curriculum represents. Providing a clearer understanding of the curriculum to educators and students could affect both the subsequent educational impact of the curriculum and the specific objectives the curriculum has been designed to attain. A variety of topics that could offer clarity regarding the development, implementation, and outcomes of curriculum for educators and students need to be discussed. These topics include:

  • Curriculum designs and practices related to cultural diversity;
  • Theories old and new underscoring curriculum development;
  • Curriculum affecting political, social economic and societal issues;
  • Intra-and interdisciplinary approaches to curriculum;
  • Play-based curriculum across subjects and grades;
  • Common and different features of curriculum across subject areas;
  • Students as curriculum designers.

Prof. Dr. Sandra N. Kaplan
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • curriculum: past, present, and future

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 533 KiB  
Article
Considering the Lessons of Curriculum Studies in the Design of Science Instruction: Varieties of Meaning and Implications for Teaching and Learning
by William F. McComas
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030238 - 25 Feb 2024
Viewed by 737
Abstract
This article is an introduction to the rich domain of curriculum studies with specific reference to science teaching and learning. It is designed not as a systematic review or theoretical treatise but rather as an overview for those charged with transforming science content [...] Read more.
This article is an introduction to the rich domain of curriculum studies with specific reference to science teaching and learning. It is designed not as a systematic review or theoretical treatise but rather as an overview for those charged with transforming science content and processes into a classroom curriculum. In other words, while written from the scholarly perspective of curriculum studies, the hope is that it will be seen by teachers as a set of possibilities rather than recommendations while reminding educators that what happens in classrooms to students and their parents is the curriculum, but it is only one of many that might have been delivered. To accomplish this, this paper explores the complex definition of curriculum including the notions of the kinds of curriculum from null, to formal, received, and learned with an emphasis on what occurs as a specific curriculum design results in effective and even faulty learning, a unique consequence proposed here. Next, we explore the common curriculum ideologies or orientations including those focused on academic advancement, tradition, student-centeredness, and social improvement. Finally, a formal recommendation for the content of science instruction in the U.S.—the Next-Generation Science Standards, is are considered as a conclusion by applying the expansive perspective of the term and nature of curriculum discussed throughout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Dimensions of Curriculum)
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19 pages, 538 KiB  
Article
Teachers’ Use of Knowledge in Curriculum Making: Implications for Social Justice
by Helen Coker, Qudsia Kalsoom and Duncan Mercieca
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14010003 - 20 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1931
Abstract
Curriculum work is a key part of teachers’ practice and involves engaging with different types of knowledge. The way in which teachers use this knowledge will influence pupils’ experience of the curriculum in their classroom. In the globalised world of the 21st century, [...] Read more.
Curriculum work is a key part of teachers’ practice and involves engaging with different types of knowledge. The way in which teachers use this knowledge will influence pupils’ experience of the curriculum in their classroom. In the globalised world of the 21st century, knowledge questions are important considerations, as schooling is situated in inequitable systems and social structures. This qualitative research study examined teachers’ use of knowledge as they made the curriculum in their classrooms. Data were generated via interviews with primary school teachers in Scotland and thematically analysed. Five types of knowledge were identified and then critically examined using Nancy Fraser’s framework for social justice. This enabled examination of the implications of teachers’ use of knowledge in their curriculum work. Findings were congruous with previous research on this topic, highlighting the complexity of curriculum work. Our analysis suggests that while the focus on ‘pupil-centred’ education is important, as it acts to recognise pupils in curriculum work, the redistribution of knowledge is a key consideration in the globalised and digitised present day. Digital tools and spaces not only provide access to information but also provide new opportunities for inequity and oppressive social relations; continual reflection on the knowledge flow into schools is an important consideration for both teachers and policy-makers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Dimensions of Curriculum)
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20 pages, 4866 KiB  
Article
Representation of Image Formation—Observation in Optics in Ethiopian Textbooks: Student Learning Difficulties as an Analytical Tool
by Ehtegebreal Aregehagn, Annette Lykknes, Dawit Asrat Getahun and Maria I. M. Febri
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13050445 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1113
Abstract
Studies have reported that students find geometric optics topics difficult partly because of representations in textbooks. In Ethiopia, textbooks are the main source of content in schools. Therefore, a study of how textbooks present certain topics can shed light on students’ learning difficulties. [...] Read more.
Studies have reported that students find geometric optics topics difficult partly because of representations in textbooks. In Ethiopia, textbooks are the main source of content in schools. Therefore, a study of how textbooks present certain topics can shed light on students’ learning difficulties. This study specifically examines how image formation–observation is presented in Ethiopian textbooks and how these representations might be the possible causes of students’ learning difficulties. Sixth-, eighth-, and tenth-grade physics textbook chapters containing topics related to image were analyzed. The analysis followed a directed approach to qualitative content analysis. The results show that textbooks sometimes contain explanations that explicitly clarify pictorials and are consistently integrated. However, the textbooks also contain implicit, missing, and incorrect verbal representations as well as incomplete, selective, and patterned pictorial representations that are presented inconsistently. Moreover, the textbooks rarely show alternative representations that complement the problematic representations, hence limiting their misinterpretations. Students may intuitively interpret implicit, selective, and patterned representations that may not conform to scientific concepts. Similarly, incorrect, missing, and incomplete representations could be seen as a direct source of students’ misconceptions. The results suggest that authors and teachers of optics textbooks should be aware of students’ learning difficulties because of representations and should emphasize alternative representations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Dimensions of Curriculum)
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11 pages, 613 KiB  
Hypothesis
Why We Can’t Wait: A Guide for Black Student Achievement Programs
by Gilman W. Whiting and Julia L. Nyberg
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14010072 - 08 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Black student achievement is vital. There must be a focused national effort to establish and sustain Black Student Achievement Programs (BSAPs). The development of BSAPs centers on African American history, culture, language, knowledge, and values. This article describes Black Student Achievement Program standards [...] Read more.
Black student achievement is vital. There must be a focused national effort to establish and sustain Black Student Achievement Programs (BSAPs). The development of BSAPs centers on African American history, culture, language, knowledge, and values. This article describes Black Student Achievement Program standards and the components of service design, curriculum and instruction, scholar identity development, and social and emotional needs, connecting the home and community for Black students in K-12th grade settings. Educators can play a vital role in the efforts to build and sustain BSAPs at their school sites and school districts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Dimensions of Curriculum)
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