The Influence of Social Context on Educational and Psychological/Cognitive Processes

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Education and Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2180

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Montana, 32 Campus Dr., Missoula, MT 59812, USA
Interests: learning; memory; metacognition
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Education Sciences announces a Special Issue entitled “The Influence of Social Context on Educational and Psychological/Cognitive Processes”. This Issue aims to cover investigations in education and learning in and out of the laboratory, within the context of wider social interaction. This could include both offline settings, such as the typical classroom, or online networks, such as social media platforms. Given the increased diversity in how we gather information, we hope to be an outlet through which researchers can disseminate information about how we learn and behave in various social environments, what works and does not work, and what potential solutions might be proposed. We believe that this research area is important because education sciences can no longer be examined without understanding their relation to the broader social world.

Suggested themes can include, but are not limited to, learning, memory, metacognition, language, decision making and judgments in all social contexts, and any psychological processes that have been or could be influenced by social media networks. We welcome contributions that highlight not only behavioral but also physiological/biological methodologies to better understand social context effects. In addition, we seek contributions from authors who are interested in any age group, from children to older adults, or performances measured in one-to-one, one-to-many, or many-to-many relationships. As academics who have considered and examined educational or psychological/cognitive processes under various social contexts or between different age groups, we hope that you will consider submitting your work to this Special Issue.

The aims and scope of the journal Education Sciences can be found at the following link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/education/about.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Behavioral Sciences.

Sincerely,

Prof. Dr. Lisa K. Son
Dr. Yoonhee Jang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • education
  • learning
  • memory
  • metacognition
  • language
  • decision making and judgments
  • online learning
  • social media
  • social network
  • teaching of psychology
  • collaboration

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 247 KiB  
Article
Addressing Religious Crises in Nigerian Secondary Schools: Parents’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of Hijabs in Christian-Named Government Schools
by Sekitla Daniel Makhasane, Akinlolu Ademola Onaolapo and Damilola Gbemisola Onaolapo
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070688 - 6 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1244
Abstract
Rural schools, especially Christian-named government schools situated in Muslim-dominated states in Nigeria, have experienced spates of violence, and this has caused a loss of lives and property. This paper examines the perceptions of parents and teachers on the presence of hijabs in Christian-named [...] Read more.
Rural schools, especially Christian-named government schools situated in Muslim-dominated states in Nigeria, have experienced spates of violence, and this has caused a loss of lives and property. This paper examines the perceptions of parents and teachers on the presence of hijabs in Christian-named government secondary schools in Nigeria. The paper uses a qualitative method to investigate how stakeholders perceive the hijab crisis and its implications for religious crises and the academic performance of learners in Nigerian secondary schools. A case study design was adopted for the study. The data collected were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings revealed that a majority of the respondents were opposed to students wearing hijabs in Christian-named government schools. Furthermore, respondents argued that the hijab crisis has implications for religious crises and could lead to increased tensions and violence in schools. Consequently, the paper concludes that stakeholders must be engaged to address the hijab crisis and to ensure the safety of learners and teachers. Strategies are also suggested for preventing and mitigating religious crises in Nigerian secondary schools. It is recommended that the government create policies that support cultural and religious diversity and provide resources for stakeholders to engage in productive dialogue. This paper provides useful insights into the perceptions of stakeholders on the presence of hijabs in Christian-named government schools in Nigeria. Full article
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