The Influence of Social Context on Educational and Psychological/Cognitive Processes

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2024 | Viewed by 2432

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Psychology, University of Montana, 32 Campus Dr., Missoula, MT 59812, USA
Interests: learning; memory; metacognition
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Behavioral Sciences announces a Special Issue entitled “The Influence of Social Context on Educational and Psychological/Cognitive Processes”. This Special Issue aims to cover investigations in education and learning in and out of the laboratory, within the context of wider social interaction. This could include both offline settings, such as the typical classroom, or online networks, such as social media platforms. Given the increased diversity in how we gather information, we hope to be an outlet through which researchers can disseminate information about how we learn and behave in various social environments, what works and does not work, and what potential solutions might be proposed. We believe that this research area is important because education sciences can no longer be examined without understanding their relation to the broader social world.

Suggested themes can include, but are not limited to, learning, memory, metacognition, language, decision making and judgments in all social contexts, and any psychological processes that have been or could be influenced by social media networks. We welcome contributions that highlight not only behavioral but also physiological/biological methodologies to better understand social context effects. In addition, we seek contributions from authors who are interested in any age group, from children to older adults, or performances measured in one-to-one, one-to-many, or many-to-many relationships. As academics who have considered and examined educational or psychological/cognitive processes under various social contexts or between different age groups, we hope that you will consider submitting your work to this Special Issue.

The aims and scope of the journal Behavioral Sciences can be found at the following link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/behavsci.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Education Sciences.

Sincerely,

Prof. Dr. Lisa K. Son
Dr. Yoonhee Jang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • education
  • learning
  • memory
  • metacognition
  • language
  • decision making and judgments
  • online learning
  • social media
  • social network
  • teaching of psychology
  • collaboration

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 1589 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Relative Perceptual Salience of Linguistic and Emotional Prosody in Quiet and Noisy Contexts
by Minyue Zhang, Hui Zhang, Enze Tang, Hongwei Ding and Yang Zhang
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 800; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13100800 - 26 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1583
Abstract
How people recognize linguistic and emotional prosody in different listening conditions is essential for understanding the complex interplay between social context, cognition, and communication. The perception of both lexical tones and emotional prosody depends on prosodic features including pitch, intensity, duration, and voice [...] Read more.
How people recognize linguistic and emotional prosody in different listening conditions is essential for understanding the complex interplay between social context, cognition, and communication. The perception of both lexical tones and emotional prosody depends on prosodic features including pitch, intensity, duration, and voice quality. However, it is unclear which aspect of prosody is perceptually more salient and resistant to noise. This study aimed to investigate the relative perceptual salience of emotional prosody and lexical tone recognition in quiet and in the presence of multi-talker babble noise. Forty young adults randomly sampled from a pool of native Mandarin Chinese with normal hearing listened to monosyllables either with or without background babble noise and completed two identification tasks, one for emotion recognition and the other for lexical tone recognition. Accuracy and speed were recorded and analyzed using generalized linear mixed-effects models. Compared with emotional prosody, lexical tones were more perceptually salient in multi-talker babble noise. Native Mandarin Chinese participants identified lexical tones more accurately and quickly than vocal emotions at the same signal-to-noise ratio. Acoustic and cognitive dissimilarities between linguistic prosody and emotional prosody may have led to the phenomenon, which calls for further explorations into the underlying psychobiological and neurophysiological mechanisms. Full article
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