Orthopedics and Trauma in Children: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Orthopedics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2024) | Viewed by 7385

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany
Interests: pediatric orthopedic surgery; limbs deformities; osteoarthritis; orthopedic tumor and sarkoma surgery; foot and ankle surgery
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Guest Editor
Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Marienkrankenhaus Soest, 59494 Soest, Germany
Interests: orthopedic biomechanics; gait analysis; hip; arthroplasty; biomechanics; kinematics; knee; motion analysis; bone; knee surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pediatric bone anatomy and physiology produce age-specific injury designs and circumstances that are special to children, making them demanding to diagnose and treat. Musculoskeletal injuries in the pediatric population are unique and require a thorough evaluation by a skilled specialist. Contrary to adults, many of the injuries may be treated closed due to children’s astonishing growth and remodeling capacity.

Orthopedic issues in children are common. They can be congenital, developmental or acquired, counting those of infectious, neuromuscular as cerebral palsy associated deformities, nutritional like rickets, neoplastic, psychogenic or traumatic.

Upper and lower limb injuries are common in children, with a general likelihood of fracture approximately 1 in 5 children. Severe lower extremity trauma introduces challenges in decision-making regarding reconstruction or amputation.

This special issue is important to address the evidence-based recommendations for management of the different orthopedic deformities related to congenital and neurological disorders, infectious problems, amputations and traumatic injuries in children, taking into consideration the different management approaches of each clinical scenario.

Contributions from all colleagues are welcomed to fill the gaps in knowledge and avail benefit.

Dr. Axel A. Horsch
Dr. Matthias Christoph M. Klotz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • orthopedic pediatric disorders
  • pediatrics limbs deformities
  • musculoskeletal diseases
  • pediatrics fractures
  • orthopedics neurological defects
  • cerebral palsy
  • syndromes
  • orthopedics treatment
  • congenital and hereditary orthopedic disorders
  • spine deformities

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 800 KiB  
Article
The 2023 Turkey Earthquake: Management of 627 Pediatric Musculoskeletal Injuries in the First Month
by Mesut Uluöz and Mehmet Yiğit Gökmen
Children 2023, 10(11), 1733; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10111733 - 26 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 923
Abstract
(1) Background: On 6February 2023, two consecutive earthquakes hit Kahramanmaraş and surrounding ten cities, killing over 50,000 people. We aimed to reveal the treatment process of pediatric patients admitted to Adana City Hospital (ACH) in the first month after the earthquake. (2) Methods: [...] Read more.
(1) Background: On 6February 2023, two consecutive earthquakes hit Kahramanmaraş and surrounding ten cities, killing over 50,000 people. We aimed to reveal the treatment process of pediatric patients admitted to Adana City Hospital (ACH) in the first month after the earthquake. (2) Methods: Demographic data of the patients, time of presentation to the emergency department, injury locations, treatment procedures, and patient file information were recorded retrospectively and evaluated statistically. (3) Results: There were 1246 patients under the age of 18. A total of 560 patients were hospitalized in the orthopedic clinic; 42% were admitted in the first 24 h and 58% in the first three days. Of these children, 69 (12%) were referred, 52 (10%) were transferred to other departments within the hospital, and 421 (75.2%) were discharged in stable condition. The number of patients with large bone fractures was 77 (34 open fractures). Fasciotomy surgery was performed on 131 patients, 78 of whom had bilateral procedures. Of the 31 patients who underwent amputation, 17 (55%) were performed within the first 24 h and 28 (90%) within the first week. (4) Conclusions: Almost all injured children are admitted to the hospital during the first few days after an earthquake. The management of earthquake injuries in pediatric patients requires specialized care and immediate attention during the treatment process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopedics and Trauma in Children: 2nd Edition)
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18 pages, 2793 KiB  
Article
Single-Stage Tibial Osteotomy for Correction of Genu Varum Deformity in Children
by Nikolas Kolbe, Frank Haydon, Johannes Kolbe and Thomas Dreher
Children 2023, 10(2), 377; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10020377 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2328
Abstract
Conservative and operative treatments with gradual or acute correction of severe varus deformities of the leg have been described. We evaluated whether the corrective osteotomy used within the NGO Mercy Ships is an effective treatment for genu varum deformity of different etiologies in [...] Read more.
Conservative and operative treatments with gradual or acute correction of severe varus deformities of the leg have been described. We evaluated whether the corrective osteotomy used within the NGO Mercy Ships is an effective treatment for genu varum deformity of different etiologies in children and which patient specific factors have an influence on the radiographic outcome. In total, 208 tibial valgisation osteotomies were performed in 124 patients between 2013 and 2017. The patients’ mean age at the time of surgery was 8.4 (2.9 to 16.9 (min/max)) years. Seven radiographically measured angles were used to assess the deformity. Clinical photographs taken pre- and postoperatively were assessed. The mean time between the surgery and the end of physiotherapeutic treatment was 13.5 (7.3 to 28) weeks. Complications were monitored and classified according to the modified Clavien–Dindo-classification system. The mean preoperative mechanical tibiofemoral angle was 42.1° varus (range: 85°–12° varus). The mean postoperative mechanical tibiofemoral angle was 4.3° varus (range: 30° varus–13° valgus). The factors predicting a residual varus deformity were higher age, greater preoperative varus deformity and the diagnosis of Blount disease. The tibiofemoral angle measured on routine clinical photographs correlated well with the radiographic measurements. The single-stage tibial osteotomy described is a simple, safe and cost-effective technique to correct three-dimensional deformities of the tibia. Our study shows very good mean postoperative results, but with a higher variability than in other studies published. Nevertheless, considering the severity of preoperative deformities and the limited opportunities for aftercare, this method is excellent for the correction of varus deformities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopedics and Trauma in Children: 2nd Edition)
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Review

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16 pages, 6821 KiB  
Review
Caudal Regression Syndrome—A Narrative Review: An Orthopedic Point of View
by Barbara Jasiewicz and Wojciech Kacki
Children 2023, 10(3), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10030589 - 19 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3622
Abstract
Abnormalities in cellular differentiation during embryo-fetal period may lead to various malformations of the spine. Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a group of defects with premature growth/development termination of the vertebral column. CRS can be divided into three types: sirenomelia, complete absence of [...] Read more.
Abnormalities in cellular differentiation during embryo-fetal period may lead to various malformations of the spine. Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a group of defects with premature growth/development termination of the vertebral column. CRS can be divided into three types: sirenomelia, complete absence of the sacrum and partial absence of the sacrum. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal anomalies are common, with neurogenic bladder and bowel incontinence. Treatment of patients with CRS is complex and multidisciplinary and should be comprehensive. The most common orthopedic problems are: spinal deformity (kyphosis and scoliosis), spinopelvic instability and lower limbs deformities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopedics and Trauma in Children: 2nd Edition)
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