Plant Circadian Clocks: Structure, Function, and Interactions with Other Signalling Systems

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant, Algae and Fungi Cell Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 8487

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Genetics, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary
2. Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary
Interests: plants; Arabidopsis thaliana; light-regulated gene expression; photoreceptors; photomorphogenesis; circadian clock; clock-regulated gene expression; flowering time; photoperiodism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Circadian rhythms have been first documented in plants; still, identification of key components of the plant clock lagged behind those of the animal, fungal, or even the prokaryotic oscillator. However, intense and fruitful research in the last two decades provided us with an enormous amount of data and information on the field of plant chronobiology. Now we know that the oscillator in plants has probably one of the most complicated structure among eukaryotes in terms of the number of elements and the number or regulatory loops operated by these. Novel mechanisms adjusting the basic transcriptional/translational oscillation have been discovered, such as regulated proteolysis or the control of gene expression at chromatin level. Identification of the role of signalling pathways across cells, tissues, and organs on the organism-level circadian regulation has moved the plant clock field closer to those based on other model organisms.

In this Special Issue, we would like to collect research and review papers, which illustrate what we achieved in the last 20 years, show the present state of the field, identify key questions and future research directions, and last but not least demonstrate how the functional interaction of the clock with other signalling systems (light, hormones, a/biotic stress, flowering) contributes to the fitness of plants.

We are prepared for the hard editorial work and hope to receive a great number of manuscripts reflecting the richness of our beautiful and exciting field.

Best regards,

Dr. László Kozma-Bognár
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant
  • circadian clock
  • temporal control of transription, chromatin state
  • temporal control of proteolysis
  • photoperiodic flowering
  • temporal control of physuiology

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

11 pages, 1649 KiB  
Article
Environmental and Circadian Regulation Combine to Shape the Rhythmic Selenoproteome
by Holly Kay, Harry Taylor and Gerben van Ooijen
Cells 2022, 11(3), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11030340 - 20 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1671
Abstract
The circadian clock orchestrates an organism’s endogenous processes with environmental 24 h cycles. Redox homeostasis and the circadian clock regulate one another to negate the potential effects of our planet’s light/dark cycle on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attain homeostasis. [...] Read more.
The circadian clock orchestrates an organism’s endogenous processes with environmental 24 h cycles. Redox homeostasis and the circadian clock regulate one another to negate the potential effects of our planet’s light/dark cycle on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attain homeostasis. Selenoproteins are an important class of redox-related enzymes that have a selenocysteine residue in the active site. This study reports functional understanding of how environmental and endogenous circadian rhythms integrate to shape the selenoproteome in a model eukaryotic cell. We mined quantitative proteomic data for the 24 selenoproteins of the picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri across time series, under environmentally rhythmic entrained conditions of light/dark (LD) cycles, compared to constant circadian conditions of constant light (LL). We found an overrepresentation of selenoproteins among rhythmic proteins under LL, but an underrepresentation under LD conditions. Rhythmic selenoproteins under LL that reach peak abundance later in the day showed a greater relative amplitude of oscillations than those that peak early in the day. Under LD, amplitude did not correlate with peak phase; however, we identified high-amplitude selenium uptake rhythms under LD but not LL conditions. Selenium deprivation induced strong qualitative defects in clock gene expression under LD but not LL conditions. Overall, the clear conclusion is that the circadian and environmental cycles exert differential effects on the selenoproteome, and that the combination of the two enables homeostasis. Selenoproteins may therefore play an important role in the cellular response to reactive oxygen species that form as a consequence of the transitions between light and dark. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2996 KiB  
Article
Inference of Gene Regulatory Network Uncovers the Linkage between Circadian Clock and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Kalanchoë fedtschenkoi
by Robert C. Moseley, Francis Motta, Gerald A. Tuskan, Steven B. Haase and Xiaohan Yang
Cells 2021, 10(9), 2217; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10092217 - 27 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2131
Abstract
The circadian clock drives time-specific gene expression, enabling biological processes to be temporally controlled. Plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis represent an interesting case of circadian regulation of gene expression as stomatal movement is temporally inverted relative to stomatal movement in [...] Read more.
The circadian clock drives time-specific gene expression, enabling biological processes to be temporally controlled. Plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis represent an interesting case of circadian regulation of gene expression as stomatal movement is temporally inverted relative to stomatal movement in C3 plants. The mechanisms behind how the circadian clock enabled physiological differences at the molecular level is not well understood. Recently, the rescheduling of gene expression was reported as a mechanism to explain how CAM evolved from C3. Therefore, we investigated whether core circadian clock genes in CAM plants were re-phased during evolution, or whether networks of phase-specific genes were simply re-wired to different core clock genes. We identified candidate core clock genes based on gene expression features and then applied the Local Edge Machine (LEM) algorithm to infer regulatory relationships between this new set of core candidates and known core clock genes in Kalanchoë fedtschenkoi. We further inferred stomata-related gene targets for known and candidate core clock genes and constructed a gene regulatory network for core clock and stomata-related genes. Our results provide new insight into the mechanism of circadian control of CAM-related genes in K. fedtschenkoi, facilitating the engineering of CAM machinery into non-CAM plants for sustainable crop production in water-limited environments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

20 pages, 1813 KiB  
Review
Regulatory Role of Circadian Clocks on ABA Production and Signaling, Stomatal Responses, and Water-Use Efficiency under Water-Deficit Conditions
by Yousef Yari Kamrani, Aida Shomali, Sasan Aliniaeifard, Oksana Lastochkina, Moein Moosavi-Nezhad, Nima Hajinajaf and Urszula Talar
Cells 2022, 11(7), 1154; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11071154 - 29 Mar 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3882
Abstract
Plants deploy molecular, physiological, and anatomical adaptations to cope with long-term water-deficit exposure, and some of these processes are controlled by circadian clocks. Circadian clocks are endogenous timekeepers that autonomously modulate biological systems over the course of the day–night cycle. Plants’ responses to [...] Read more.
Plants deploy molecular, physiological, and anatomical adaptations to cope with long-term water-deficit exposure, and some of these processes are controlled by circadian clocks. Circadian clocks are endogenous timekeepers that autonomously modulate biological systems over the course of the day–night cycle. Plants’ responses to water deficiency vary with the time of the day. Opening and closing of stomata, which control water loss from plants, have diurnal responses based on the humidity level in the rhizosphere and the air surrounding the leaves. Abscisic acid (ABA), the main phytohormone modulating the stomatal response to water availability, is regulated by circadian clocks. The molecular mechanism of the plant’s circadian clock for regulating stress responses is composed not only of transcriptional but also posttranscriptional regulatory networks. Despite the importance of regulatory impact of circadian clock systems on ABA production and signaling, which is reflected in stomatal responses and as a consequence influences the drought tolerance response of the plants, the interrelationship between circadian clock, ABA homeostasis, and signaling and water-deficit responses has to date not been clearly described. In this review, we hypothesized that the circadian clock through ABA directs plants to modulate their responses and feedback mechanisms to ensure survival and to enhance their fitness under drought conditions. Different regulatory pathways and challenges in circadian-based rhythms and the possible adaptive advantage through them are also discussed. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop