Oral Tissue Stem Cells in Regenerative Dentistry

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Stem Cells".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2939

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Human Genetics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 8, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: medical genetics; cancer molecular biology; cancer genetics; stem cell research
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Guest Editor
Department of Human Genetics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 8, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: dental stem cells; molecular biology; dental biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regenerative dentistry has forced modern dentistry to improve its clinical and scientific efforts during the past ten years. Adult stem cells known as mesenchymal stem cells have strong immunoregulatory and regeneration abilities. Among the accessible sources of MSC are dental tissues. Dental pulp, apical papilla, dental follicle, and periodontal ligament-derived dental stem cells (DSCs), to name a few, represent very promising cell supplies for the regeneration of a variety of tissues and organs. Meanwhile, newly developed dental materials in conjunction with DSC-derived bioactive compounds (e.g., extracellular vesicles) have been used for orofacial tissue repair in experimental research and clinical practice.

Successful tissue engineering strategies require a profound understanding of the DSCs’ biology and their behavior in the presence of various biomaterials for wider clinical applications. The scientific knowledge gained from this Special Issue will serve as an important foundation for upcoming research and the development of DSCs-based therapeutic tools in regenerative dentistry.

This Special Issue aims to collect manuscripts that offer insights on topics related to the use of oral tissue stem cells, regenerative medicine, orofacial tissue repair, and dental materials for tissue regeneration. The manuscripts can be original research articles, reviews, or other types of writing.

Various types of research, including experimental and preclinical investigations, are welcomed.

We look forward to your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Jelena Milasin
Dr. Miloš M. Lazarević
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral tissue stem cells
  • oral tissue regeneration
  • dental materials
  • stem cell-derived exosomes
  • stem cell engineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 4256 KiB  
Article
Dental Pulp Cell Transplantation Combined with Regenerative Endodontic Procedures Promotes Dentin Matrix Formation in Mature Mouse Molars
by Jorge Luis Montenegro Raudales, Yuta Okuwa and Masaki Honda
Cells 2024, 13(4), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13040348 - 16 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) are promising for dental pulp tissue regeneration; however, their application in permanent teeth remains challenging. We assessed the potential combination of an REP and local dental pulp cell (DPC) transplantation in the mature molars of C57BL/6 mice with (REP [...] Read more.
Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) are promising for dental pulp tissue regeneration; however, their application in permanent teeth remains challenging. We assessed the potential combination of an REP and local dental pulp cell (DPC) transplantation in the mature molars of C57BL/6 mice with (REP + DPC group) or without (REP group) transplantation of DPCs from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. After 4 weeks, the regenerated tissue was evaluated by micro-computed tomography and histological analyses to detect odontoblasts, vasculogenesis, and neurogenesis. DPCs were assessed for mesenchymal and pluripotency markers. Four weeks after the REP, the molars showed no signs of periapical lesions, and both the REP and REP + DPC groups exhibited a pulp-like tissue composed of a cellular matrix with vessels surrounded by an eosin-stained acellular matrix that resembled hard tissue. However, the REP + DPC group had a broader cellular matrix and uniquely contained odontoblast-like cells co-expressing GFP. Vasculogenesis and neurogenesis were detected in both groups, with the former being more prominent in the REP + DPC group. Overall, the REP was achieved in mature mouse molars and DPC transplantation improved the outcomes by inducing the formation of odontoblast-like cells and greater vasculogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Tissue Stem Cells in Regenerative Dentistry)
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Review

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23 pages, 1003 KiB  
Review
The Genetic Aspects of Periodontitis Pathogenesis and the Regenerative Properties of Stem Cells
by Klaudia Ustianowska, Łukasz Ustianowski, Estera Bakinowska, Kajetan Kiełbowski, Joanna Szostak, Martyna Murawka, Bartosz Szostak and Andrzej Pawlik
Cells 2024, 13(2), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13020117 - 9 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Periodontitis (PD) is a prevalent and chronic inflammatory disease with a complex pathogenesis, and it is associated with the presence of specific pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Dysbiosis and dysregulated immune responses ultimately lead to chronic inflammation as well as tooth and [...] Read more.
Periodontitis (PD) is a prevalent and chronic inflammatory disease with a complex pathogenesis, and it is associated with the presence of specific pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Dysbiosis and dysregulated immune responses ultimately lead to chronic inflammation as well as tooth and alveolar bone loss. Multiple studies have demonstrated that genetic polymorphisms may increase the susceptibility to PD. Furthermore, gene expression is modulated by various epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, or the activity of non-coding RNA. These processes can also be induced by PD-associated pathogens. In this review, we try to summarize the genetic processes that are implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. Furthermore, we discuss the use of these mechanisms in diagnosis and therapeutic purposes. Importantly, novel treatment methods that could promote tissue regeneration are greatly needed in PD. In this paper, we also demonstrate current evidence on the potential use of stem cells and extracellular vesicles to stimulate tissue regeneration and suppress inflammation. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PD, as well as the impact of PD-associated bacteria and stem cells in these processes, may enhance future research and ultimately improve long-term treatment outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Tissue Stem Cells in Regenerative Dentistry)
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