Stem Cell, Differentiation, Regeneration and Diseases

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Stem Cells".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3097

Special Issue Editors

State Key Laboratory Cell Differentiation and Regulation, College of Life Science, Institute of Biomedical Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007, China
Interests: lung stem cell; pulmonary fibrosis; lung repair; drug discovery

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Guest Editor
Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010, USA
Interests: stem cell; induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC); brain organoid; disease modeling; regenerative medicine; immune therapy; drug discovery

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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory Cell Differentiation and Regulation, College of Life Science, Institute of Biomedical Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007, China
Interests: neural stem cell differentiation; glial differentiation; epigenetic regulation of neurogenesis; neurodevelopmental disorders; neural regeneration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into various cell types, offering hope for treating and even curing many devastating diseases. Differentiation, the process by which stem cells become specialized cells, is a critical step in harnessing the potential of stem cells for therapeutic purposes. Illustrating the mechanisms and factors that regulate stem cell differentiation will help to better control and direct this process. Tissue regeneration is a rapidly growing field that aims to replace or repair damaged tissues and organs, using the potential of stem cells to regenerate various tissues, such as the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. Stem cell research also help us to understand and treat human diseases. This includes studies on the role of stem cells in the development and progression of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders, as well as investigations into the potential of stem cell-based therapies for treating these conditions.

This Special Issue aims to assemble the original articles and reviews on stem-cell-related research. We look forward to your contributions and hope that it will provide a valuable resource for the stem cell research community, driving the field forward and fostering the development of new therapies.

Dr. Guoying Yu
Dr. Guoqiang Sun
Dr. Jiancheng Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stem cell
  • development
  • differentiation
  • tissue regeneration
  • organoid
  • disease modeling
  • stem cell therapy
  • cancer

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 73643 KiB  
Article
Establishment and Characterization of SV40 T-Antigen Immortalized Porcine Muscle Satellite Cell
by Mengru Ni, Jingqing He, Tao Li, Gan Zhao, Zhengyu Ji, Fada Ren, Jianxin Leng, Mengyan Wu, Ruihua Huang, Pinghua Li and Liming Hou
Cells 2024, 13(8), 703; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13080703 - 18 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Muscle satellite cells (MuSCs) are crucial for muscle development and regeneration. The primary pig MuSCs (pMuSCs) is an ideal in vitro cell model for studying the pig’s muscle development and differentiation. However, the long-term in vitro culture of pMuSCs results in the gradual [...] Read more.
Muscle satellite cells (MuSCs) are crucial for muscle development and regeneration. The primary pig MuSCs (pMuSCs) is an ideal in vitro cell model for studying the pig’s muscle development and differentiation. However, the long-term in vitro culture of pMuSCs results in the gradual loss of their stemness, thereby limiting their application. To address this conundrum and maintain the normal function of pMuSCs during in vitro passaging, we generated an immortalized pMuSCs (SV40 T-pMuSCs) by stably expressing SV40 T-antigen (SV40 T) using a lentiviral-based vector system. The SV40 T-pMuSCs can be stably sub-cultured for over 40 generations in vitro. An evaluation of SV40 T-pMuSCs was conducted through immunofluorescence staining, quantitative real-time PCR, EdU assay, and SA-β-gal activity. Their proliferation capacity was similar to that of primary pMuSCs at passage 1, and while their differentiation potential was slightly decreased. SiRNA-mediated interference of SV40 T-antigen expression restored the differentiation capability of SV40 T-pMuSCs. Taken together, our results provide a valuable tool for studying pig skeletal muscle development and differentiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cell, Differentiation, Regeneration and Diseases)
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21 pages, 5477 KiB  
Article
Differentiation of Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Endothelial Cells Depends on Fat Depot Conditions: Regulation by miRNA
by Gemma Arderiu, Anna Civit-Urgell, Alberto Díez-Caballero, Fabrizio Moscatiello, Carlos Ballesta and Lina Badimon
Cells 2024, 13(6), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13060513 - 14 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The development of obesity is associated with substantial modulation of adipose tissue (AT) structure. The plasticity of the AT is reflected by its remarkable ability to expand or reduce in size throughout the adult lifespan, which is linked to the development of its [...] Read more.
The development of obesity is associated with substantial modulation of adipose tissue (AT) structure. The plasticity of the AT is reflected by its remarkable ability to expand or reduce in size throughout the adult lifespan, which is linked to the development of its vasculature. This increase in AT vasculature could be mediated by the differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) into endothelial cells (ECs) and form new microvasculature. We have already shown that microRNA (miRNA)-145 regulates the differentiation of ASCs into EC-like (ECL) cells. Here, we investigated whether ASCs-differentiation into ECs is governed by a miRNAs signature that depends on fat depot location and /or the metabolic condition produced by obesity. Human ASCs, which were obtained from white AT by surgical procedures from lean and obese patients, were induced to differentiate into ECL cells. We have identified that miRNA-29b-3p in both subcutaneous (s)ASCs and visceral ASCs and miRNA-424-5p and miRNA-378a-3p in subcutaneous (s)ASCs are involved in differentiation into EC-like cells. These miRNAs modulate their pro-angiogenic effects on ASCs by targeting FGFR1, NRP2, MAPK1, and TGF-β2, and the MAPK signaling pathway. We show for the first time that miRNA-29b-3p upregulation contributes to ASCs’ differentiation into ECL cells by directly targeting TGFB2 in both sASCs and visceral ASCs. Moreover, our results reveal that, independent of sASCs’ origin (obese/lean), the upregulation of miRNA-378a-3p and the downregulation of miRNA-424-5p inhibit MAPK1 and overexpress FGFR1 and NRP2, respectively. In summary, both the adipose depot location and obesity affect the differentiation of resident ASCs through the expression of specific miRNAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cell, Differentiation, Regeneration and Diseases)
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Review

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22 pages, 1151 KiB  
Review
Hematopoietic Stem Cells as an Integrative Hub Linking Lifestyle to Cardiovascular Health
by Xinliang Chen, Chaonan Liu, Junping Wang and Changhong Du
Cells 2024, 13(8), 712; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13080712 - 19 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Despite breakthroughs in modern medical care, the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is even more prevalent globally. Increasing epidemiologic evidence indicates that emerging cardiovascular risk factors arising from the modern lifestyle, including psychosocial stress, sleep problems, unhealthy diet patterns, physical inactivity/sedentary behavior, alcohol [...] Read more.
Despite breakthroughs in modern medical care, the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is even more prevalent globally. Increasing epidemiologic evidence indicates that emerging cardiovascular risk factors arising from the modern lifestyle, including psychosocial stress, sleep problems, unhealthy diet patterns, physical inactivity/sedentary behavior, alcohol consumption, and tobacco smoking, contribute significantly to this worldwide epidemic, while its underpinning mechanisms are enigmatic. Hematological and immune systems were recently demonstrated to play integrative roles in linking lifestyle to cardiovascular health. In particular, alterations in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis, which is usually characterized by proliferation, expansion, mobilization, megakaryocyte/myeloid-biased differentiation, and/or the pro-inflammatory priming of HSCs, have been shown to be involved in the persistent overproduction of pro-inflammatory myeloid leukocytes and platelets, the cellular protagonists of cardiovascular inflammation and thrombosis, respectively. Furthermore, certain lifestyle factors, such as a healthy diet pattern and physical exercise, have been documented to exert cardiovascular protective effects through promoting quiescence, bone marrow retention, balanced differentiation, and/or the anti-inflammatory priming of HSCs. Here, we review the current understanding of and progression in research on the mechanistic interrelationships among lifestyle, HSC homeostasis, and cardiovascular health. Given that adhering to a healthy lifestyle has become a mainstream primary preventative approach to lowering the cardiovascular burden, unmasking the causal links between lifestyle and cardiovascular health from the perspective of hematopoiesis would open new opportunities to prevent and treat CVD in the present age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cell, Differentiation, Regeneration and Diseases)
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