State of the Art in Stem Cell Culture for Regenerative Medicine

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Stem Cells".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1111

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Public Health, University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: cell differentiation; cardiac cell therapy; biomaterials; three-dimensional cell cultures; stem cells; extracellular matrix

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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry “Scuola Medica Salernitana”, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: anatomy; histology; cell biology; congenital heart defects; adult stem cells

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Guest Editor
Department of Public Health, University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: cardiac regenerative medicine; decellularized tissues; extracellular matrix; biological scaffolds; iPSCs; cardiac progenitor cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The unique properties of stem cells, namely self-renewal and differentiation, make them capable of tissue and organ maintenance, endowing abilities of regeneration during physiological cell turnover or after pathological cell injury and loss. For these reasons, stem cells of various differentiation potential, i.e., pluripotent, multipotent, and unipotent (tissue-specific), have been isolated, manipulated, and evaluated in the pre-clinical and clinical studies for their use in regenerative medicine. Since the in vitro properties of these cells do not necessarily translate into tissue or organ regeneration when administered in vivo, the interactions between cells, extracellular matrix/scaffold and cytokines/growth factors are considered essential for guaranteeing cell properties and overseeing regulation in the living tissue, giving rise to bioengineering. Nowadays, regenerative medicine investigates several in vitro cell enhancement strategies, aiming at long-term cell survival, differentiation and tissue-specific function without genomic instability and rejection. The scope of this Special Issue is to present and discuss (in the form of original research papers and descriptive reviews) the state of the art in cell culture for regenerative medicine.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to: embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells or tissue-specific, unipotent stem cells; classic or three-dimensional support; decellularized native extracellular matrix or biomimetic bio-engineered scaffolds; growth factor stimulation or mechanical activation for differentiation and structural organization; and any other emerging approach influencing the in vitro translation of the in vivo conditions for stem cell culture.

Dr. Franca Di Meglio
Dr. Daria Nurzynska
Prof. Dr. Clotilde Castaldo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • stem cells
  • cell culture techniques
  • regenerative medicine
  • tissue engineering

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 5306 KiB  
Article
Development of a Mouse Experimental System for the In Vivo Characterization of Bioengineered Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells
by Taeko Ichise, Hirotake Ichise and Yusuke Shimizu
Cells 2024, 13(7), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13070582 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 725
Abstract
Human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are an important resource for cell-based therapies. However, the dynamics of ADSCs after transplantation and their mechanisms of action in recipients remain unclear. Herein, we generated genetically engineered mouse ADSCs to clarify their biodistribution and post-transplantation status and [...] Read more.
Human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are an important resource for cell-based therapies. However, the dynamics of ADSCs after transplantation and their mechanisms of action in recipients remain unclear. Herein, we generated genetically engineered mouse ADSCs to clarify their biodistribution and post-transplantation status and to analyze their role in recipient mesenchymal tissue modeling. Immortalized ADSCs (iADSCs) retained ADSC characteristics such as stromal marker gene expression and differentiation potential. iADSCs expressing a fluorescent reporter gene were seeded into biocompatible nonwoven fabric sheets and transplanted into the dorsal subcutaneous region of neonatal mice. Transplanted donor ADSCs were distributed as CD90-positive stromal cells on the sheets and survived 1 month after transplantation. Although accumulation of T lymphocytes or macrophages inside the sheet was not observed with or without donor cells, earlier migration and accumulation of recipient blood vascular endothelial cells (ECs) inside the sheet was observed in the presence of donor cells. Thus, our mouse model can help in studying the interplay between donor ADSCs and recipient cells over a 1-month period. This system may be of value for assessing and screening bioengineered ADSCs in vivo for optimal cell-based therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art in Stem Cell Culture for Regenerative Medicine)
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