Advances in Tinnitus and Hearing Disorders

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Systems Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3167

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Tinnitus Center, European Hospital, 00149 Rome, Italy
Interests: tinnitus; hearing loss; hyperacusis; misophonia; clinical questionnaires; audiometry; benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; dizziness
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Guest Editor Assistant
Past Head of the Audiology Unit, Policlinico Universitario, Palermo, Italy
Interests: tinnitus; hearing loss; hyperacusis; misophonia; clinical questionnaires; audiometry; benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; dizziness

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Guest Editor Assistant
Division for Otorhinolaryngology, Department of Adult and Development Age Human Pathology “Gaetano Barresi”, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: ENT; vestibology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The diagnosis and therapy of tinnitus and hearing disorders such as hyperacusis and misophonia are complex because their underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are not well established. In the last decades, clinical and biochemical markers (including imaging techniques and genetics) as well as teleaudiology have emerged as promising tools for hearing disorders.

The current Special Issue of Brain Sciences aims to present the latest research on the clinical findings for adult and pediatric tinnitus and hearing disorders. Relevant cutting-edge research includes optical coherence tomography and teleaudiology.

Authors are invited to submit relevant original research and review papers.

Dr. Alessandra Fioretti
Guest Editor

Dr. Aldo Messina
Dr. Francesco Ciodaro
Guest Editor Assistants

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tinnitus
  • teleaudiology
  • sudden sensorineural hearing loss
  • hyperacusis
  • biomarkers
  • neuroinflammation
  • autoimmune inner ear disease
  • optical coherence tomography
  • misophonia
  • neuroimaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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21 pages, 745 KiB  
Article
Improving Audiology Student Training by Clinical Simulation of Tinnitus: A Glimpse of the Lived Experience of Tinnitus
by Pierre H. Bourez, Guillaume T. Vallet and Philippe Fournier
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(9), 1338; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13091338 - 17 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Purpose: Student audiology training in tinnitus evaluation and management is heterogeneous and has been found to be insufficient. We designed a new clinical simulation laboratory for training students on psychoacoustic measurements of tinnitus: one student plays the role of the tinnitus patient, wearing [...] Read more.
Purpose: Student audiology training in tinnitus evaluation and management is heterogeneous and has been found to be insufficient. We designed a new clinical simulation laboratory for training students on psychoacoustic measurements of tinnitus: one student plays the role of the tinnitus patient, wearing a device producing a sound like tinnitus on one ear, while another student plays the role of the audiologist, evaluating their condition. The objective of the study was to test this new clinical simulation laboratory of tinnitus from the perspective of the students. Method: This study reports the findings from twenty-one audiology students (20 female and 1 male, mean age = 29, SD = 7.7) who participated in this laboratory for a mandatory audiology class at the Laval University of Quebec. Three students had hearing loss (one mild, two moderate). All students played the role of both the clinician and the patient, alternately. They also had to fill out a questionnaire about their overall experience of the laboratory. Results: The qualitative analysis revealed three main themes: “Benefits of the laboratory on future practice”, “Barriers and facilitators of the psychoacoustic assessment”, and “Awareness of living with tinnitus”. The participants reported that this experience would have a positive impact on their ability to manage tinnitus patients in their future career. Conclusion: This fast, cheap, and effective clinical simulation method could be used by audiology and other healthcare educators to strengthen students’ skills and confidence in tinnitus evaluation and management. The protocol is made available to all interested parties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Tinnitus and Hearing Disorders)
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32 pages, 398 KiB  
Perspective
The Analogy between Tinnitus and Chronic Pain: A Phenomenological Approach
by Arnaud J. Norena
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(8), 1129; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13081129 - 27 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1205
Abstract
Tinnitus is an auditory sensation without external acoustic stimulation or significance, which may be lived as an unpleasant experience and impact the subject’s quality of life. Tinnitus loudness, which is generally low, bears no relation to distress. Factors other than psychoacoustic (such as [...] Read more.
Tinnitus is an auditory sensation without external acoustic stimulation or significance, which may be lived as an unpleasant experience and impact the subject’s quality of life. Tinnitus loudness, which is generally low, bears no relation to distress. Factors other than psychoacoustic (such as psychological factors) are therefore implicated in the way tinnitus is experienced. The aim of this article is to attempt to understand how tinnitus can, like chronic pain, generate a ‘crisis’ in the process of existence, which may go as far as the collapse of the subject. The main idea put forward in the present article is that tinnitus may be compared to the phenomenon of pain from the point of view of the way it is experienced. Although the analogy between tinnitus and pain has often been made in the literature, it has been limited to a parallel concerning putative physiopathological mechanisms and has never really been explored in depth from the phenomenological point of view. Tinnitus is comparable to pain inasmuch as it is felt, not perceived: it springs up (without intention or exploration), abolishes the distance between the subject and the sensation (there is only a subject and no object), and has nothing to say about the world. Like pain, tinnitus is formless and abnormal and can alter the normal order of the world with maximum intensity. Finally, tinnitus and pain enclose the subject within the limits of the body, which then becomes in excess. Tinnitus may be a source of suffering, which affects not only the body but a person’s very existence and, in particular, its deployment in time. Plans are thus abolished, so time is no longer ‘secreted’, it is enclosed in an eternal present. If the crisis triggered by tinnitus is not resolved, the subject may buckle and collapse (depression) when their resources for resisting are depleted. The path may be long and winding from the moment when tinnitus emerges to when it assaults existence and its eventual integration into a new existential norm where tinnitus is no longer a source of disturbance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Tinnitus and Hearing Disorders)
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