Biomaterials for Biosensing Applications

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 2376

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Joint UNC/NCSU Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
Interests: electrochemical sensors; optical sensors; wearable sensors; nanomaterials for sensing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Palakkad, Palakkad 678623, Kerala, India
Interests: biosensors; electrochemical sensors; wearable sensors; aptamers; point-of-care diagnostics; electrochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, NC, USA.
Interests: Biosensor, 3D printing, microneedles technology, personalized healthcare, quantum dots, nanomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Interests: biomaterials; flexible microstructured biosensors; metal–organic frameworks; microneedle sensors; photopolymer–drug conjugates
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IdentifySensors Biologics, 1203 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Interests: biosensors; wearable devices; nanomaterials; flexible electronics; electrochemical biosensors; lab on chip devices; point of care detection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biopolymer-protected hybrid nanocomposites are versatile and diverse materials that have played important roles in a wide range of applications. Currently, biomaterial-based nanomaterials are emerging and quickly growing in various research fields including biomedical sciences and sensors. Furthermore, nanoparticles (such as CNT, graphene, MXene, metal, and metal oxide nanoparticles) embedded in biopolymers (chitosan, lignin, cellulose, alginate, collagen, and gelatin) for electrochemical and optical sensor applications have enormously increased. These biopolymer-protected hybrid nanomaterials play important roles in non-invasive wearable devices, in vivo sensing devices, and point-of-care sensing machines.

This Special Issue, “Biomaterials for Biosensing Applications”, covers research on biomaterial-based point of care or wearable-based sensors used for the rapid detection of various analytes, including biomarkers, pharmaceutical drugs, and agricultural/environmental toxins, with the help of electrochemical/optical transduction techniques. Here, the main focus is on the development of hand-held biomaterial-based chem-biosensing assays, sensor modules, and prototypes for the miniaturized onsite usage of them.

We encourage authors to submit research articles and reviews to this Special Issue to share your work, knowledge, insights, and recent accomplishments with the biosensor research community.

Prof. Dr. Roger Narayan
Dr. Yugender Goud Kotagiri
Dr. Sachin Kadian
Dr. Shubhangi Shukla
Dr. Rupesh Kumar Mishra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • biosensors
  • point-of-care diagnostics
  • electrochemical sensors
  • optical sensors
  • wearable sensors
  • in vivo sensors
  • chitosan
  • lignin
  • cellulose
  • alginate
  • collagen
  • gelatin

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 2287 KiB  
Article
Highly Sensitive Qualitative and Quantitative Identification of Cashmere and Wool Based on Terahertz Electromagnetically Induced Transparent Metasurface Biosensor
by Dongpeng Luo, Limin Xu, Lifeng Jia, Lianglun Cheng, Ping Tang and Jinyun Zhou
Biosensors 2024, 14(5), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14050240 - 10 May 2024
Viewed by 338
Abstract
Cashmere and wool are both natural animal fibers used in the textile industry, but cashmere is of superior quality, is rarer, and more precious. It is therefore important to distinguish the two fibers accurately and effectively. However, challenges due to their similar appearance, [...] Read more.
Cashmere and wool are both natural animal fibers used in the textile industry, but cashmere is of superior quality, is rarer, and more precious. It is therefore important to distinguish the two fibers accurately and effectively. However, challenges due to their similar appearance, morphology, and physical and chemical properties remain. Herein, a terahertz electromagnetic inductive transparency (EIT) metasurface biosensor is introduced for qualitative and quantitative identification of cashmere and wool. The periodic unit structure of the metasurface consists of four rotationally symmetric resonators and two cross−arranged metal secants to form toroidal dipoles and electric dipoles, respectively, so that its effective sensing area can be greatly improved by 1075% compared to the traditional dipole mode, and the sensitivity will be up to 342 GHz/RIU. The amplitude and frequency shift changes of the terahertz transmission spectra caused by the different refractive indices of cashmere/wool can achieve highly sensitive label−free qualitative and quantitative identification of both. The experimental results show that the terahertz metasurface biosensor can work at a concentration of 0.02 mg/mL. It provides a new way to achieve high sensitivity, precision, and trace detection of cashmere/wool, and would be a valuable application for the cashmere industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Biosensing Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 3199 KiB  
Article
Using a Smartphone-Based Colorimetric Device with Molecularly Imprinted Polymer for the Quantification of Tartrazine in Soda Drinks
by Christian Jacinto, Ily Maza Mejía, Sabir Khan, Rosario López, Maria D. P. T. Sotomayor and Gino Picasso
Biosensors 2023, 13(6), 639; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13060639 - 9 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1509
Abstract
The present study reports the development and application of a rapid, low-cost in-situ method for the quantification of tartrazine in carbonated beverages using a smartphone-based colorimetric device with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). The MIP was synthesized using the free radical precipitation method with [...] Read more.
The present study reports the development and application of a rapid, low-cost in-situ method for the quantification of tartrazine in carbonated beverages using a smartphone-based colorimetric device with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). The MIP was synthesized using the free radical precipitation method with acrylamide (AC) as the functional monomer, N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide (NMBA) as the cross linker, and potassium persulfate (KPS) as radical initiator. The smartphone (RadesPhone)-operated rapid analysis device proposed in this study has dimensions of 10 × 10 × 15 cm and is illuminated internally by light emitting diode (LED) lights with intensity of 170 lux. The analytical methodology involved the use of a smartphone camera to capture images of MIP at various tartrazine concentrations, and the subsequent application of the Image-J software to calculate the red, green, blue (RGB) color values and hue, saturation, value (HSV) values from these images. A multivariate calibration analysis of tartrazine in the range of 0 to 30 mg/L was performed, and the optimum working range was determined to be 0 to 20 mg/L using five principal components and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 mg/L was obtained. Repeatability analysis of tartrazine solutions with concentrations of 4, 8, and 15 mg/L (n = 10) showed a coefficient of variation (% RSD) of less than 6%. The proposed technique was applied to the analysis of five Peruvian soda drinks and the results were compared with the UHPLC reference method. The proposed technique showed a relative error between 6% and 16% and % RSD lower than 6.3%. The results of this study demonstrate that the smartphone-based device is a suitable analytical tool that offers an on-site, cost-effective, and rapid alternative for the quantification of tartrazine in soda drinks. This color analysis device can be used in other molecularly imprinted polymer systems and offers a wide range of possibilities for the detection and quantification of compounds in various industrial and environmental matrices that generate a color change in the MIP matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Biosensing Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop