Latest Research in Post-COVID (Long COVID): Pathological and Treatment Studies of Sequelae and Complications—2nd Edition

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular and Translational Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1943

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Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922 Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
Interests: chronic pain; pain neuroscience education, manual therapy; central nervous system sensitization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The SARS-CoV-2 virus led to a worldwide outbreak of the disease. Current knowledge on SARS-CoV-2 acute infection has dramatically increased. However, healthcare systems and professionals are fighting against a “hidden” and underestimated consequence of the virus: the presence of long-lasting symptoms after acute infection. This condition has been called long COVID or post-COVID-19 syndrome. In fact, “long-haulers” is the term used to refer to subjects who have recovered from SARS-COV-2 infection but have developed post-COVID symptoms. Increasing studies have supported the presence of more than 100 potential symptoms after the acute phase of infection. Although long COVID as a term was proposed in July 2020, a potential consensus on the definition was only reached by the WHO in December 2021. However, several gaps are still present in the research regarding the identification, timeframe, mechanisms, and treatment strategies for the management of post-COVID symptoms. We are pleased to invite you to submit to this Special Issue, “Latest Research in Post-COVID (Long COVID): Pathological and Treatment Studies of Sequelae and Complications”.

This Special Issue aims to better understand the mechanisms underlying post-COVID-19 symptoms and post-COVID sequelae (associated with real tissue damage) to improve management of these patients. Identification of groups of long haulers according to mechanisms could lead to better treatment approaches. This Special Issue will focus on all these aspects of post-COVID symptoms and sequelae, a topic of emerging relevance due to the presence of millions of “long-haulers”. This is highly relevant since long COVID is independent of the SARS-CoV-2 variant or the implementation of vaccination programs. At the same time, research on adverse reactions or sequelae of COVID vaccines should also be of concern.  We invite researchers/clinicians to submit original articles and comprehensive reviews covering the identification or management of post-COVID subgroups to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. César Fernández De Las Peñas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • long-COVID
  • pain
  • function
  • fatigue
  • dyspnoea
  • vaccine

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 670 KiB  
Article
Kidney Function Tests and Continuous eGFR Decrease at Six Months after SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Patients Clinically Diagnosed with Post-COVID Syndrome
by Madalina Boruga, Susa Septimiu-Radu, Prashant Sunil Nandarge, Ahmed Elagez, Gabriela Doros, Voichita Elena Lazureanu, Emil Robert Stoicescu, Elena Tanase, Roxana Iacob, Andreea Dumitrescu, Adrian Vasile Bota, Coralia Cotoraci and Melania Lavinia Bratu
Biomedicines 2024, 12(5), 950; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12050950 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 488
Abstract
The long-term sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection are still under research, since extensive studies showed plenty of systemic effects of the viral infection, extending even after the acute phase of the infection. This study evaluated kidney function tests six months after SARS-CoV-2 infection in [...] Read more.
The long-term sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection are still under research, since extensive studies showed plenty of systemic effects of the viral infection, extending even after the acute phase of the infection. This study evaluated kidney function tests six months after SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients clinically diagnosed with Post-COVID Syndrome, hypothesizing persistent renal dysfunction evidenced by altered kidney function tests compared to baseline levels. Continuous eGFR decrease <30 at six months post-infection was considered the main study outcome. Conducted at the “Victor Babes” Hospital, this retrospective observational study involved adults with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and clinically-diagnosed Post-COVID Syndrome, excluding those with prior chronic kidney disease or significant renal impairment. Kidney function tests, including serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), alongside markers of kidney damage such as proteinuria and hematuria, were analyzed. Among 206 participants, significant differences were observed between the control (n = 114) and the Post-COVID group (n = 92). The Post-COVID group exhibited higher serum creatinine (109.7 μmol/L vs. 84.5 μmol/L, p < 0.001), lower eGFR (65.3mL/min/1.73 m2 vs. 91.2 mL/min/1.73 m2, p < 0.001), and elevated BUN levels (23.7 mg/dL vs. 15.2 mg/dL, p < 0.001) compared to the control group. Regression analysis highlighted significant predictors of continuous eGFR decrease <30 at six months post-infection. The development of acute kidney injury (AKI) during the initial COVID-19 illness emerged as a strong predictor of reduced eGFR (β = 3.47, p < 0.001). Additional factors, including a creatinine increase (23 μmol/L above the normal range) and an elevated Albumin to Creatinine Ratio (ACR) (>11 mg/g above the normal range), were significantly associated with eGFR reduction. Patients with Post-COVID Syndrome demonstrate significant renal impairment six months post-SARS-CoV-2 infection. The study’s findings stress the need for ongoing monitoring and intervention strategies for renal health in affected individuals, underscoring the persistent impact of COVID-19 on renal function. Full article
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Review

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20 pages, 1385 KiB  
Review
Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) in the Treatment of Long COVID Olfactory Disorders: A Comprehensive Review
by Antonino Maniaci, Salvatore Lavalle, Edoardo Masiello, Jerome R. Lechien, Luigi Vaira, Paolo Boscolo-Rizzo, Mutali Musa, Caterina Gagliano and Marco Zeppieri
Biomedicines 2024, 12(4), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12040808 - 5 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: Long COVID has brought numerous challenges to healthcare, with olfactory dysfunction (OD) being a particularly distressing outcome for many patients. The persistent loss of smell significantly diminishes the affected individual’s quality of life. Recent attention has been drawn to the potential of [...] Read more.
Background: Long COVID has brought numerous challenges to healthcare, with olfactory dysfunction (OD) being a particularly distressing outcome for many patients. The persistent loss of smell significantly diminishes the affected individual’s quality of life. Recent attention has been drawn to the potential of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy as a treatment for OD. This comprehensive review aims to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP therapy in ameliorating OD, especially when associated with long-term COVID-19. Methods: We executed a comprehensive search of the literature, encompassing clinical trials and observational studies that utilized PRP in treating OD limited to COVID-19. We retrieved and comprehensively discussed data such as design, participant demographics, and reported outcomes, focusing on the efficacy and safety of PRP therapy for OD in COVID-19 patients. Results: Our comprehensive analysis interestingly found promising perspectives for PRP in OD following COVID-19 infection. The collective data indicate that PRP therapy contributed to a significant improvement in olfactory function after COVID-19 infection. Conclusions: The evidence amassed suggests that PRP is a promising and safe therapeutic option for OD, including cases attributable to Long COVID-19. The observed uniform enhancement of olfactory function in patients receiving PRP highlights the necessity for well-designed, controlled trials. Such studies would help to refine treatment protocols and more definitively ascertain the efficacy of PRP in a broader, more varied patient cohort. Full article
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