Ultrasound Imaging in Chronic Pain

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging and Theranostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1723

Special Issue Editors

Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922 Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
Interests: chronic pain; pain neuroscience education, manual therapy; central nervous system sensitization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultrasound imaging is a non-invasive diagnostic tool that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of internal body structures. This imaging modality has several advantages over other imaging techniques, such as X-ray, CT scan, or MRI. First, it is safe, painless, and does not involve ionizing radiation, making it suitable for repeated examinations. Second, it provides real-time images, allowing for dynamic assessments of the affected area. Third, it is portable and cost-effective, making it accessible to a wide range of healthcare professionals.

One area where ultrasound imaging has gained increasing attention is in the evaluation and treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Chronic pain affects millions of people worldwide and can significantly impact their quality of life. In rehabilitation, ultrasound imaging is used to evaluate the extent and severity of soft tissue injuries, such as ligament sprains, tendon strains, and muscle tears, which are common causes of musculoskeletal pain.

In addition, ultrasound-guided interventions can provide targeted delivery to the affected area, resulting in better pain relief and improved functional outcomes. Furthermore, ultrasound imaging can be used for biofeedback training, which involves monitoring muscle activity during exercises and providing visual or auditory cues to help patients to achieve optimal activation patterns.

Overall, ultrasound imaging has become an essential tool in the evaluation and treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain in rehabilitation. Its non-invasive, real-time, and cost-effective nature makes it ideal for use in clinical practice.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your article to this Special Issue “Ultrasound Imaging in Chronic Pain”. This Special Issue aims to provide an in-depth exploration of the latest advances in ultrasound imaging for chronic pain assessment and management, highlighting its potential to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. We invite researchers/clinicians to submit original articles, cohort studies, case-control studies, systematic reviews, narrative reviews, or meta-analysis about ultrasound and chronic pain to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Alburquerque-Sendín
Prof. Dr. César Fernández De Las Peñas
Dr. Juan Antonio Valera-Calero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ultrasound
  • evaluation
  • pain
  • musculoskeletal
  • neuropathicism
  • rehabilitation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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11 pages, 2290 KiB  
Article
Pressure Pain Hypersensitivity and Ultrasound Changes in the Radial Nerve in Patients with Unilateral Lateral Epicondylalgia: A Case–Control Study
Diagnostics 2023, 13(15), 2488; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics13152488 - 26 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 756
Abstract
Some authors have proposed the potential role of the radial nerve in lateral epicondylalgia. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of pressure pain hyperalgesia and nerve swelling (increased cross-sectional area) assessed with ultrasound imaging on the radial nerve in [...] Read more.
Some authors have proposed the potential role of the radial nerve in lateral epicondylalgia. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of pressure pain hyperalgesia and nerve swelling (increased cross-sectional area) assessed with ultrasound imaging on the radial nerve in people with lateral epicondylalgia, and to investigate if an association exists between pressure pain sensitivity and cross-sectional area. A total of 37 patients with lateral epicondylalgia (43% women, age: 45.5 ± 9.5 years) and 37 age- and sex-matched pain-free controls were recruited for participation. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed bilaterally on the radial nerve at the spiral groove, the arcade of Frohse, and the anatomic snuffbox in a blinded design. Further, the cross-sectional area of the radial nerve at the spiral groove and antecubital fossa was also assessed. The results demonstrated lower PPTs on the radial nerve of the affected side in individuals with lateral epicondylalgia as compared with the unaffected side (p < 0.01) and with both sides in healthy controls (p < 0.001). Additionally, the cross-sectional area of the radial nerve on the affected side in patients was higher compared with the unaffected side (p < 0.01) and both sides in healthy controls (p < 0.001). The cross-sectional area of the radial nerve at the spiral groove was negatively associated with PPTs over the radial nerve at the spiral groove (r = −0.496, p = 0.002) and positively associated with function (r = 0.325, p = 0.045). Our findings revealed generalized pressure pain hyperalgesia and also nerve swelling of the radial nerve in people with lateral epicondylalgia, suggesting the presence of a widespread sensitization of nerve tissues in this population. The radial nerve could represent a potential peripheral drive to initial and maintain altered pain processing in lateral epicondylalgia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging in Chronic Pain)
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8 pages, 6420 KiB  
Technical Note
Ultrasound Imaging of the Articularis Genus Muscle: Implications for Ultrasound-Guided Suprapatellar Recess Injection
Diagnostics 2024, 14(2), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14020183 - 14 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Elucidating its dynamic interaction within the knee joint, this exploration delves into the awareness regarding the articularis genus muscle for ultrasound-guided suprapatellar recess injections. While injections into the infrapatellar recess may proceed without ultrasound guidance, we highlight concerns regarding the potential cartilage injury. [...] Read more.
Elucidating its dynamic interaction within the knee joint, this exploration delves into the awareness regarding the articularis genus muscle for ultrasound-guided suprapatellar recess injections. While injections into the infrapatellar recess may proceed without ultrasound guidance, we highlight concerns regarding the potential cartilage injury. In contrast, especially with ultrasound guidance, suprapatellar recess injections significantly mitigate this risk, especially in the case of collapsed recess. Originating from the distal femur and vastus intermedius, the articularis genus muscle influences the tension of the suprapatellar recess during knee motion. Sonographically identifying this muscle involves visualizing the slender linear structure of the suprapatellar recess, with guidance on differentiation from the vastus intermedius. We provide a succinct approach to ultrasound-guided suprapatellar recess injections, emphasizing needle insertion techniques and strategies to prevent fluid accumulation. In conclusion, this study serves as a concise clinician’s guide, underscoring the significance of the articularis genus muscle’s sonoanatomy in ultrasound-guided suprapatellar recess injections. Ultimately, procedural precision and patient safety can be advanced in this aspect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging in Chronic Pain)
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