Fresh-Keeping Technology and Quality Appraisal of Dairy Products

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2021) | Viewed by 4280

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Science, Catholic University of the Sacred Hearth, Milano, Italy
Interests: innovations in food technology; food shelf-life extension; food safety; functional foods; food by-product valorization

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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Food & Environment, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy
Interests: food packaging; food processing and preservation; shelf life extension; functional food; sanitizing techniques; byproduct valorization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy
Interests: packaging; food preservation; sanitizing techniques; active compounds in the process and active packaging systems; functional food; byproduct valorization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fresh dairy products are susceptible to physical, chemical and microbiological deterioration throughout storage and distribution. Traditional thermal processes applied to milk or derived dairy foods are valid sanitizing methods for retaining product quality but are known to reduce the nutritional content of foods and to affect their sensory properties. For this reason, scientific research has explored alternative non-thermal technologies. In this context, the current Special Issue aims to collect the emerging non-thermal technologies applied to the fresh dairy sector and the advances in milk processing that many dairy companies would need to consider. Therefore, original articles or review papers dealing with the application of high-pressure processing, pulsed electric fields, continuous and pulsed UV light, ultrasound, ionizing radiation (X-rays, electron beams and gamma radiation), cold plasma and dense carbon dioxide to milk and/or fresh cheese are suitable for consideration.  

Another approach widely addressed in much recent scientific literature is the valorization of food by-products. These kinds of residues are generally thrown away in the form of leftovers and used as feed or composted, but they are a great source of bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, antimicrobials, vitamins and minerals. The amount of residue with the potential for utilization after processing has been estimated to be in the millions of tons every year. For this reason, many researchers all around the world are making great efforts to valorize and reuse these valuable resources. From the perspective of seeking more sustainable approaches, the current Special Issue is also collecting original articles or review papers dealing with the reutilization of food by-products or their extracts to retain dairy product quality. The applications of food by-products to enhance the properties of the packaging applied to dairy food can be also taken into account.

Prof. Dr. Angelo S. Vittorio Zambrini
Prof. Dr. Amalia Conte
Prof. Dr. Matteo Alessandro Del Nobile
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • fresh cheese
  • mild technologies
  • cheese quality
  • hurdle technology
  • sustainable dairy food
  • food by-products
  • dairy packaging
  • sustainable active packaging
  • food preservation
  • shelf-life extension

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 9413 KiB  
Article
Chitosan and Lemon Extract Applied during Giuncata Cheese Production to Improve the Microbiological Stability
by Daniela Gammariello, Massimiliano Attanasio, Matteo Alessandro Del Nobile and Amalia Conte
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(16), 7446; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11167446 - 13 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1234
Abstract
In this study, lemon extract and chitosan were used as antimicrobial agents during Giuncata cheese production in order to assess whether the natural compounds would improve the cheese’s microbial quality. In particular, the viable cell concentration of the main spoilage microbial growth ( [...] Read more.
In this study, lemon extract and chitosan were used as antimicrobial agents during Giuncata cheese production in order to assess whether the natural compounds would improve the cheese’s microbial quality. In particular, the viable cell concentration of the main spoilage microbial growth (Pseudomonas spp. and total coliforms) was monitored during refrigerated storage at 4 °C. A central composite design (CCD) was adopted to highlight a possible synergic effect of the two selected compounds. The results showed that a decrease in the cell growth rate of the monitored spoilage microorganisms was observed for all cheese samples added with active agents, when compared with the control cheese. Despite the recorded antimicrobial activity, an antagonist effect was detected when the two compounds were combined at the highest concentrations. In fact, the best performance was obtained when the lemon and the chitosan were used individually at concentrations of 500 and 60 ppm, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fresh-Keeping Technology and Quality Appraisal of Dairy Products)
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16 pages, 1081 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Quality and Safety of Farm Level Produced Cheeses from Sheep and Goat Milk
by Mariana Kováčová, Jana Výrostková, Eva Dudriková, František Zigo, Boris Semjon and Ivana Regecová
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 3196; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11073196 - 02 Apr 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2498
Abstract
Consumption of sheep’s and goat’s milk and cheese is currently increasing. The production process of these types of cheese is being carried out by traditional domestic production at farm level. However, knowledge in the field of hygiene, technology and health safety of cheeses [...] Read more.
Consumption of sheep’s and goat’s milk and cheese is currently increasing. The production process of these types of cheese is being carried out by traditional domestic production at farm level. However, knowledge in the field of hygiene, technology and health safety of cheeses are still insufficient. This study aimed to examine the physical and chemical quality and microbiological safety of sheep’s and goat’s milk and cheeses made from them. The month of milking influenced the content of milk components (p < 0.001) in sheep’s milk and goat’s milk, but no changes in SCC content during the examined period were found (p > 0.05). Level of contamination by Enterobacteriaceae sp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci was lower than 5 log CFU/mL in sheep’s and goat’s milk. During the ripening time, the number of lactic acid bacteria significantly raised (p < 0.001). Ripening time statistically changed (p < 0.001) not just the microbial safety of cheeses but also the color (p < 0.01). Under the applicable regulations, the analyzed samples were evaluated as suitable for human consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fresh-Keeping Technology and Quality Appraisal of Dairy Products)
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