Biotechnological Applications of Yeasts in Food Science

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2022) | Viewed by 8613

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Food Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; silage microbiology; yeast biotechnology; circular economy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Food Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences—SGGW, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: enzyme biosynthesis; the use of microorganisms in biotransformations and biocatalysis; enzymatic synthesis of aroma compounds (lactones, green note aroma compounds) and surfactants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Yeasts form an artificial group of fungi comprising mostly unicellular organisms and have  been  used  by mankind for making fermented food e.g.  bread,  beer  and  wine  since  ancient  ages. They have earned acceptability due to its long history of application in food industry and are considered natural.  Traditionally yeasts has been used for the production of alcoholic beverages, dairy, vegetable and meat fermented food, protein-rich biomass and glycerol. Modern applications of yeasts covers feed and fodder production, food additives synthesis, whole-cell biocatalysis and pure enzymatic catalysis or pollutants decontamination.

The special issue is focused on the newest biotechnological applications of yeast in food science. We encourage Scientists to bring the most updated information on utility of unexpected features of different yeasts species, recent achievements in bioprocess optimization, the use of yeast in enzymatic biocatalysis or biotransformations (including their use as microbial cell factories to produce enzymes, alcohols, organic acids, flavors and fragrances compounds and food additives) and interesting applications of genetic tools in this mentioned biotechnological applications.

As Guest Editors of this Special Issue, we look forward to reviewing your submissions on conventional and non-conventional yeasts, regarding their fascinating possibilities to apply in food science, overlapping agricultural sciences, nutritional sciences, food safety and food technology.

Dr. Agata Urszula Fabiszewska
Dr. Jolanta Małajowicz
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • yeast cell factories
  • food science
  • yeast genetic engineering
  • secondary metabolites
  • industrial yeasts
  • fermentation technology
  • whole cell biocatalyst

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 2035 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Different Non-Conventional Yeasts on the Odour-Active Compounds of Produced Beers
by Paweł Satora and Aneta Pater
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 2872; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13052872 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1913
Abstract
The interest in new beer products, which has been growing for several years, forces technologists and brewers to look for innovative raw materials, such as hops, new sources of carbohydrates or yeast. The aim of the presented study was to evaluate the effect [...] Read more.
The interest in new beer products, which has been growing for several years, forces technologists and brewers to look for innovative raw materials, such as hops, new sources of carbohydrates or yeast. The aim of the presented study was to evaluate the effect of selected Saccharomyces (Saccharomyces paradoxus (CBS 7302), S. kudriavzevii (CBS 3774), S. cerevisiae (Safbrew T-58)) and non-Saccharomyces yeast (W. anomalus (CBS 5759), Ha. uvarum (CBS 2768), D. bruxellensis (CBS 3429), Z. bailii (CBS 749), and T. delbrueckii (D10)) on the fermentation process, basic parameters and odour-active compounds of the produced beers. The chemical composition and key aroma components of the obtained beers were determined using various chromatographic methods (HPLC, GC-FID, GC-MS, and GC-O). We showed large differences between the key aroma components depending on the culture of microorganisms used. Forty different compounds that have an active impact on the creation of the aroma of beers were detected, among which the most important are: β-phenylethanol, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl 4-methylpentanoate, ethyl dihydrocinnamate and β-damascenone. We also found the presence of components specific to the yeast strain used, such as 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol, γ-decalactone, methional, nerolidol and others. Among the analyzed yeasts, S. kudriavzevii and W. anomalus should be distinguished, which produced beers with intense fruity and floral aromas and were also characterized by favorable features for brewing. The Z. bailii strain also turned out to be interesting as a potential starter culture for the production of low-alcohol beers, significantly differing in sensory characteristics from the standard ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnological Applications of Yeasts in Food Science)
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16 pages, 1559 KiB  
Article
Improved Gamma-Decalactone Synthesis by Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast Using Taguchi Robust Design Method
by Jolanta Małajowicz, Agata Fabiszewska, Dorota Nowak and Sabina Kuśmirek
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(20), 10231; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122010231 - 11 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1814
Abstract
The production of gamma-decalactone (GDL) by Yarrowia lipolytica is mainly based on the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid, derived from castor oil triglycerides. The main difficulty in this process is the multitude of factors that determine the growth rate of microorganisms, and thus affect [...] Read more.
The production of gamma-decalactone (GDL) by Yarrowia lipolytica is mainly based on the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid, derived from castor oil triglycerides. The main difficulty in this process is the multitude of factors that determine the growth rate of microorganisms, and thus affect the efficiency of lactone synthesis. In order to improve the technological aspects of GDL biosynthesis in batch culture, the influence of three factors was determined: substrate concentration, medium mixing intensity, and its pH, using the Taguchi solid design method (based on orthogonal array design). On the basis of four bioreactor batch cultures, the most favorable culture conditions in terms of GDL synthesis were selected using the statistical Taguchi method. The statistical method of experimental planning has shown that the optimal parameters of lactone biosynthesis are a constant pH at the level of 7, a variable mixing speed in the range of 200–500 rpm, and a substrate concentration at the level of 75 g/L. Using these parameters, about 2.93 ± 0.33 g/L of aroma was obtained. The intensity of mixing turned out to be the most important factor influencing the increase in GDL concentration in the medium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnological Applications of Yeasts in Food Science)
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18 pages, 2306 KiB  
Article
Factors Affecting the Yield in Formation of Fat-Derived Fragrance Compounds by Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast
by Jolanta Małajowicz and Mariola Kozłowska
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 9843; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11219843 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1724
Abstract
Yarrowia lipolytica belongs to the group of microorganisms widely used in scientific research for environmentally friendly biotransformation reactions. This yeast produces a number of compounds important from the point of view of the food and cosmetics industries, including flavor and fragrance compounds. The [...] Read more.
Yarrowia lipolytica belongs to the group of microorganisms widely used in scientific research for environmentally friendly biotransformation reactions. This yeast produces a number of compounds important from the point of view of the food and cosmetics industries, including flavor and fragrance compounds. The results of selected studies on the possibility of biosynthesis of fat-derived fragrances, namely gamma-decalactone (GDL) and hexanal, are presented in this article. The wild-type Yarrowia yeast strain KKP379 and the LOX/HPL mutant were used in the studies. With the aim of improving the synthesis yield of both aroma compounds, parameters such as concentration of lipid substrate, the type of culture medium, and the addition of surfactants, and, not yet verified in the available literature in this context, the concentration of inoculum, the addition of heptane, and the emulsification of culture medium were analyzed. The research showed that the concentration of the lipid substrate and the degree of emulsification of the medium had a significant influence on the amount of GDL production. The higher the content of castor oil in the medium, the higher the concentration of the synthesized aroma compound, with a significant extension of the reaction time. By varying the concentration of castor oil in the medium in the range of 10–100 g/L, an increase in the lactone concentration was obtained from 1.86 ± 0.15 g/L to 3.06 ± 0.2 g/L, with a simultaneous extension of the reaction from 3 to 7 days. It is noteworthy that the additional application of the emulsification of the medium allowed the efficiency of GDL biosynthesis to be significantly increased by over 2 g/L to a lactone concentration of approximately 5.25 ± 0.10 g/L. This is one of the highest reported concentrations for the production of this biofragrance by the wild strain. In the case of hexanal synthesis, the increase of the concentration of linoleic acid in the culture medium from 25 g/L to 100 g/L resulted in a 5-fold higher concentration of aldehyde in the cell extract. At a higher concentration of the lipid substrate in the medium, the modified whole-cell catalyst showed a higher activity of lipoxygenase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnological Applications of Yeasts in Food Science)
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Review

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11 pages, 318 KiB  
Review
Molecular Tools to Exploit the Biotechnological Potential of Brettanomyces bruxellensis: A Review
by Alessandra Di Canito, Roberto Foschino, Martina Mazzieri and Ileana Vigentini
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(16), 7302; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11167302 - 09 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1918
Abstract
The Brettanomyces bruxellensis species plays various roles in both the industrial and food sectors. At the biotechnological level, B. bruxellensis is considered to be a promising species for biofuel production. Its presence in alcoholic beverages can be detrimental or beneficial to the final [...] Read more.
The Brettanomyces bruxellensis species plays various roles in both the industrial and food sectors. At the biotechnological level, B. bruxellensis is considered to be a promising species for biofuel production. Its presence in alcoholic beverages can be detrimental or beneficial to the final product; B. bruxellensis can contribute to spoilage of wine and beer, but can also produce good aromas. However, little is known about its genetic characteristics and, despite the complete sequencing of several B. bruxellensis genomes and knowledge of its metabolic pathways, the toolkits for its efficient and easy genetic modification are still underdeveloped. Moreover, the different ploidy states and the high level of genotype diversity within this species makes the development of effective genetic manipulation tools challenging. This review summarizes the available tools for the genetic manipulation of B. bruxellensis and how they may be employed to improve the quality of wine and beer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnological Applications of Yeasts in Food Science)
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