Advances in Sport Science: Athlete Development and Performance

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 June 2024 | Viewed by 2510

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences Office, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
Interests: sport science; athlete monitoring; weightlifting; force plate assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Applied research aimed at an improved understanding of the training process and/or underlying aspects of sport performance can be invaluable to coaches and sport scientists. Competitive athletes can respond differently than untrained or recreationally trained individuals to the same training stimuli. Additionally, the physiological makeup of more advanced athletes has been shown to favor certain “profiles” (e.g., anthropometrics, muscle fiber type) depending on the sport. This general area of research is often challenging for many reasons, e.g., small sample sizes, lack of a true control group, and studies being conducting well past the initial adaptation period.

This Special Issue welcomes research on trained athletes of various sports and developmental stages, including cross-sectional research (e.g., relationships), longitudinal studies (e.g., training studies), and review articles.

Dr. William Guyton Hornsby
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sport science
  • athlete monitoring
  • performance testing
  • coach education

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

28 pages, 623 KiB  
Review
The Use of Free Weight Squats in Sports: A Narrative Review—Terminology and Biomechanics
by Michael H. Stone, W. Guy Hornsby, Satoshi Mizuguchi, Kimitake Sato, Daniel Gahreman, Marco Duca, Kevin M. Carroll, Michael W. Ramsey, Margaret E. Stone, Kyle C. Pierce and G. Gregory Haff
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 1977; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14051977 - 28 Feb 2024
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Abstract
There is substantial evidence indicating that increased maximum strength as a result of training with squats, particularly full and parallel squats, is associated with superior athletic capabilities, such as sprinting, jumping and agility. Although full and parallel squats have been strongly associated with [...] Read more.
There is substantial evidence indicating that increased maximum strength as a result of training with squats, particularly full and parallel squats, is associated with superior athletic capabilities, such as sprinting, jumping and agility. Although full and parallel squats have been strongly associated with sport performance, there is also some evidence that the use of partial squats may provide angle specific adaptations that are likely advantageous for specific sporting activities. Partial squats may be particularly advantageous when trained in conjunction with full or parallel squats, as this practice results in a greater training effect. There is a paucity of evidence that squatting is associated with excessive injuries to the knees, lower back, or other structures. Evidence does indicate that squatting, including full squats, can be undertaken safely, provided an appropriate training methodology is applied. Indeed, based on scientific data, the cost/benefit ratio indicates that squats should be recommended and should be a central strength training exercise for the preparation of athletes in most sports, particularly those requiring strong and powerful whole body and lower body movements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport Science: Athlete Development and Performance)
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