Innovative Materials, Smart Sensors and IoT-based Electronic Solutions for Wearable Applications

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2024 | Viewed by 4298

Special Issue Editors

Departament of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Interests: design and testing of IoT-based electronic systems; smart remote control of facilities; electronic systems for automation and automotive; energy harvesting systems for sensors nodes; wearable devices for health monitoring; new materials and advanced sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia Via, Università del Salento, Lecce, Italy
Interests: nanotechnology; nanophotonics; MEMS
Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Interests: design of electronic boards; firmware programming of microcontroller-based boards; sensors and energy-harvesting applications; development of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) and body area networks (BANs); wearable devices for health monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wearable sensors and electronic systems are increasingly entering people’s lives, enabling real-time monitoring of health conditions and parameters, physical activity, and much more. The peculiarities of such devices are their flexibility, low power dissipation, wireless connectivity, reduced invasiveness, manufacturing simplicity, and multi-functionality. New advanced materials and sensing methodologies are being studied for integration into flexible and wearable sensors with specific characteristics as well as new energy harvesting techniques to make the devices energetically autonomous. All these sensors need a suitable conditioning section for impedance matching and adapting the provided signal features to the designed acquisition system.

This Special Issue, Innovative Materials, Smart Sensors and IoT-Based Electronic Solutions for Wearable Applications, aims to bring together innovative developments and synergies related, but not limited, to the following topics:

- Electronic wearable solutions for IoT-based health monitoring applications;

- Wearable systems for bio-physical parameters detection: electronic issues;

- Wearable devices for assisting people with physical disabilities, active living, and rehabilitation;

-New materials and smart sensors for wearable applications;

-Less-battery Implantable devices;

-3D Printing Technology applied to wearable sensor development;

-Flexible sensors and actuators for wearable devices;

-Soft electronic for the signal conditioning applied ro wearable sensors;

- Energy harvesting systems for wearable applications: advances and open issues;

- Electronic wearable solutions for smart homes and workplaces;

- Low-power electronic solutions for signals acquisition/processing from wearable sensors;

- Embedded solutions and platforms for data processing: firmware issues and applications;

- Software development for wearable sensors and body sensors network.

Prof. Dr. Paolo Visconti
Prof. Dr. Massimo De Vittorio
Dr. Fazio Roberto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

30 pages, 22775 KiB  
Article
An Energy-Autonomous Smart Shirt Employing Wearable Sensors for Users’ Safety and Protection in Hazardous Workplaces
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 2926; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12062926 - 13 Mar 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3629
Abstract
Wearable devices represent a versatile technology in the IoT paradigm, enabling non-invasive and accurate data collection directly from the human body. This paper describes the development of a smart shirt to monitor working conditions in particularly dangerous workplaces. The wearable device integrates a [...] Read more.
Wearable devices represent a versatile technology in the IoT paradigm, enabling non-invasive and accurate data collection directly from the human body. This paper describes the development of a smart shirt to monitor working conditions in particularly dangerous workplaces. The wearable device integrates a wide set of sensors to locally acquire the user’s vital signs (e.g., heart rate, blood oxygenation, and temperature) and environmental parameters (e.g., the concentration of dangerous gas species and oxygen level). Electrochemical gas-monitoring modules were designed and integrated into the garment for acquiring the concentrations of CO, O2, CH2O, and H2S. The acquired data are wirelessly sent to a cloud platform (IBM Cloud), where they are displayed, processed, and stored. A mobile application was deployed to gather data from the wearable devices and forward them toward the cloud application, enabling the system to operate in areas where a WiFi hotspot is not available. Additionally, the smart shirt comprises a multisource harvesting section to scavenge energy from light, body heat, and limb movements. Indeed, the wearable device integrates several harvesters (thin-film solar panels, thermoelectric generators (TEGs), and piezoelectric transducers), a low-power conditioning section, and a 380 mAh LiPo battery to accumulate the recovered charge. Field tests indicated that the harvesting section could provide up to 216 mW mean power, fully covering the power requirements (P¯ = 1.86 mW) of the sensing, processing, and communication sections in all considered conditions (3.54 mW in the worst-case scenario). However, the 380 mAh LiPo battery guarantees about a 16-day lifetime in the complete absence of energy contributions from the harvesting section. Full article
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