Chemical and Functional Properties of Food and Natural Products: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 1681

Special Issue Editors

Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Al. Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Krakow, Poland
Interests: health-promoting properties of food; non-communicable chronic diseases; assessment of human nutrition and nutritional status
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, 30-149 Krakow, Poland
Interests: assessment of the basic composition of food: the influence of functional additives, technological processes, packaging, and storage on selected health quality parameters of food products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, 30-149 Krakow, Poland
Interests: human nutrition; antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties; plant food
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food properties that reduce the risk of chronic non-communicable diseases represent an important issue, both for scientists and consumers.

The functional and health properties of food depend not only on the content of nutrients, non-nutrients, and chemical pollutants, but also on the various methods of its treatment.

The aim of modern methods of food processing, preservation, and storage is to modify both techniques and parameters, as well as the composition of food, in order to obtain a product with widely understood pro-health properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-hypertensive, anti-cancer, immune-boosting, and many other properties.

This Special Issue will be dedicated to new perspectives regarding the chemical and functional properties of foods and other natural products.

Subjects that will be discussed in this Special Issue will focus not only on modern methods, technologies, and the further handling of food prior to its consumption, but also on the verification of its properties in animal or human studies.

Prof. Dr. Teresa Leszczyńska
Dr. Joanna Kapusta-Duch
Dr. Ewa Piątkowska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • chemical properties of food
  • health properties of food
  • modern methods of functional food production
  • animal research
  • human studies

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 1799 KiB  
Article
The Nutritional Value Adequacy and Microbiological Quality of Canned Foods for Puppies and Adult Dogs
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14020760 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 545
Abstract
The pet food industry’s growth, driven by increased demand for premium options, emphasizes the popularity of canned dog foods due to their palatability and convenience. This study evaluates the nutritional and microbiological quality of canned dog food for puppies and adult dogs, with [...] Read more.
The pet food industry’s growth, driven by increased demand for premium options, emphasizes the popularity of canned dog foods due to their palatability and convenience. This study evaluates the nutritional and microbiological quality of canned dog food for puppies and adult dogs, with and without grains, immediately after opening and following 24 h of incubation simulating home storage conditions. The grain-free products exhibited higher protein and energy levels, while the grain-included products contained more ether extract, crude ash, and nitrogen-free extract. Age-specific differences revealed higher ether extract, crude ash, crude fiber, and energy in growing dog foods and more nitrogen-free extract in adult dog foods. Discrepancies between labeled nutrient values and laboratory results indicated overstatements for ether extract and underestimations for protein and crude ash. A microbiological analysis showed that the canned dog foods were generally safe when opened, but after 24 h, 85% exhibited bacterial presence, emphasizing the need for rigorous evaluation. A statistical analysis did not confirm associations between grain presence or age group and microbiological contamination. This study underscores the importance of accurate labeling for nutritional value and emphasizes the need for microbiological safety evaluations, especially in regions lacking specific regulatory standards, to ensure pet food safety and nutritional adequacy. Full article
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11 pages, 608 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Activity and Peptide Levels of Water-Soluble Extracts of Feta, Metsovone and Related Cheeses
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010265 - 28 Dec 2023
Viewed by 457
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activity and peptide levels of Feta cheese and other brined cheeses, and Metsovone cheese and other smoked cheeses. Feta, goat and cow cheeses are classified as brined. Feta cheese is made [...] Read more.
The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activity and peptide levels of Feta cheese and other brined cheeses, and Metsovone cheese and other smoked cheeses. Feta, goat and cow cheeses are classified as brined. Feta cheese is made exclusively from ewe milk or ewe milk with the addition of a small amount of goat milk. Metsovone and other smoked cheeses are made from cow milk with a possible addition of small amounts of ewe and goat milk. The antioxidant activity was determined using Folin and FRAP assays, while the peptide content was determined using Bradford and Lowry assays. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed using the lipoxygenase inhibition assay. The assays were applied in the water-soluble extract of cheeses. The results showed that Feta cheese and brined cow cheese differed in antioxidant activity. Feta cheese and brined goat cheese also differed in both antioxidant activity and peptide levels. Specifically, Feta cheese had higher antioxidant activity in comparison with both goat and cow cheeses. As for peptide content, Feta cheese had a higher peptide level compared to goat cheese. The results also showed that Metsovone cheese and other smoked cheeses exhibited significant antioxidant activity and peptide levels. Moreover, the water-soluble extracts of all cheeses showed some anti-inflammatory activity. Full article
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20 pages, 4808 KiB  
Article
Physicochemical Characteristics, Vitamin C, Total Polyphenols, Antioxidant Capacity, and Sensory Preference of Mixed Juices Prepared with Rose Fruits (Rosa rugosa) and Apple or Strawberry
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010113 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 495
Abstract
One of the main factors in the poor use of rose fruits (Rosa rugosa) for juice production is the tart-sour taste of the raw material. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the physicochemical characteristics (pH, titratable acidity, total [...] Read more.
One of the main factors in the poor use of rose fruits (Rosa rugosa) for juice production is the tart-sour taste of the raw material. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the physicochemical characteristics (pH, titratable acidity, total soluble solids, and colour), vitamin C, total polyphenols, antioxidant capacity only performed by DPPH assay, and sensory preference of mixed juices prepared on the basis of rose fruits (Rosa rugosa). The pH values, total acidity values, total soluble solids, and colour on the CIE L*a*b* scale of mixed juices were in the range of 3.47–3.96, 0.94–1.36 g citric acid/100 mL, 15.8–21.1 °Brix, and L* 77.46–87.38, a* 1.90–13.90, b* 30.18–54.39, respectively. The mixed juices showed high contents of total phenolic compounds (116.21–250.48 mg GAE/100 mL), total vitamin C (64.18–132.21 mg/100 mL), and DPPH scavenging capacity (30.15–39.23 µg Trolox/mL). Rose-apple juices (AC1 and AC2) were rated best for tartness and sourness (least tart—3.5 and 3.32, least sour—4.73 and 4.43 for AC1 and AC2 juice, respectively), and also for overall impression (4.93 and 4.86 for AC1 and AC2 juice, respectively). The mixed-rosa juices can be an alternative for adding nutritional value. Full article
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