New Insights into Antioxidant Capacities of Plant-Based Food

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2023) | Viewed by 2865

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Al. Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Krakow, Poland
Interests: plant-based foods; antioxidant activity; glycaemic index; antitumor and antidiabetic activity of plant-based food; toxins in food
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant-based foods (fruits and vegetables) are usually considered as the greatest potential source of antioxidative compounds in the daily diet. This knowledge is even more crucial considering that the lack of a physiological balance between free radicals developed in the body and their natural method of inactivation leads to oxidative stress and the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. Plant-derived antioxidants may help protect the human system from diseases resulting from a weakened immune system. Impaired body balance is nowadays considered to be the main cause of aging and the emergence of chronic non-communicable diseases (diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular and neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's). There is already some evidence that certain plant polyphenols might have much more powerful antioxidant properties than other well-known antioxidant vitamins; however, these findings should still be at the forefront of current scientific interest. The present Special Issue, although not exhaustive, uncovers the potential of common and uncommon plants as well as plant-based foods as a possible source of valuable antioxidants in the human diet as an effective way to maintain human body wellness and to protect against the development of several types of diseases.

Prof. Dr. Barbara Borczak
Prof. Dr. Joanna Kapusta-Duch
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • antioxidative properties
  • plant-based foods
  • anticancer potential
  • health
  • chronic non-communicable diseases
  • functional foods
  • pharmacological activities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1288 KiB  
Article
Addition of by-Products and Flavored Hydrocolloids Filling in Californian-Style Black Olive to Reduce Acrylamide Formation
by Antonio Fernández, Ismael Montero-Fernández, Francisco Pérez-Nevado, Manuel Martínez and Daniel Martín-Vertedor
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(20), 10265; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122010265 - 12 Oct 2022
Viewed by 834
Abstract
Oxidized black table olives are frequently consumed in the Mediterranean diet. To improve food quality, the use of by-products is an emergent strategy that should be more studied. With a better understanding of the use of by-products, healthier food with the highest possible [...] Read more.
Oxidized black table olives are frequently consumed in the Mediterranean diet. To improve food quality, the use of by-products is an emergent strategy that should be more studied. With a better understanding of the use of by-products, healthier food with the highest possible quality could be obtained, increasing its added value. Different by-products at different concentrations (1:10 and 1:100) and phenol-rich aromatized hydrocolloids were added to Californian-style black olive in order to evaluate its effect in acrylamide. In general, the addition of by-products before the sterilization process resulted in a significant reduction of the acrylamide content (10–60%). The highest inhibition was obtained with the phenolic extract at a 1:10 dilution. Furthermore, flavored olives stuffed with higher concentrations caused a greater reduction in acrylamide content. The ’Garlic’ and ‘Thyme’ flavors showed the greatest reduction of this toxic substance. The tasting panel considered that olives with a 1:10 dilution and olives filled with flavored hydrocolloids at low concentrations had a pleasant odor and positive sensory attributes. Orange peel was the recommended by-product to mitigate the effects of acrylamide since it obtained the highest score both in acrylamide inhibition and in the taste panel. As for the hydrocolloids, ‘Thyme’ showed the greatest inhibition effect but did not perform well in the taste panel, with similar effects to ‘Oregano’ and ‘Garlic.’ The current research attempts to underline the use of local by-products to obtain additives rich in antioxidant activity that could enhance oxidized black table olives, becoming a healthier, safer and better-quality products. Moreover, this connects with the idea of moving from a linear economy to a circular economy, obtaining a product of high economic value from a by-product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Antioxidant Capacities of Plant-Based Food)
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13 pages, 321 KiB  
Article
Retention of Antioxidants from Dried Carrot Pomace in Wheat Bread
by Rafał Ziobro, Eva Ivanišová, Tatiana Bojňanská and Dorota Gumul
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(19), 9735; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12199735 - 27 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1624
Abstract
The trial aimed to check the retention of carrot pomace antioxidants in wheat bread, using a variety of colorimetric assays. It was observed that the addition of 15% dried carrot pomace significantly affected dough properties. The enriched bread was acceptable in terms of [...] Read more.
The trial aimed to check the retention of carrot pomace antioxidants in wheat bread, using a variety of colorimetric assays. It was observed that the addition of 15% dried carrot pomace significantly affected dough properties. The enriched bread was acceptable in terms of technological parameters but exhibited strong carrot flavor and orange color. The incorporation of antioxidants from carrot pomace allowed us to increase the antioxidant potential of wheat bread (32% for DPPH and ABTS assays, 3 times for FRAP and 4 times for FOMO). The extent of the changes in contents of individual groups of antioxidants was not always proportional to the applied addition level (increase in polyphenols was almost eight times, flavonoids—nine times, phenolic acids—two times and flavonols—eight times, compared to the control). The study revealed that the antioxidant properties of the pomace are largely preserved during baking, and therefore such a product could be used for the production of breadcrumbs for coating and admixing purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Antioxidant Capacities of Plant-Based Food)
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