Functional Foods: Bioactivity and Potential Health Effects

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 1912

Special Issue Editors

Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, A. Mickiewicz Av. 21, 31-120 Krakow, Poland
Interests: nutrition and dietetics; functional foods; health-related effects of bioactive compounds; conjugated fatty acids; vitamin K; atherosclerosis; in vivo studies on animal models, e.g., genetically modified mice
Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, A. Mickiewicz Av. 21, 31-120 Krakow, Poland
Interests: nutrition; molecular bilogy; nutrigenomics; atherosclerosis; calory restriction; in vivo studies on animal models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue entitled “Functional Foods: Bioactivity and Potential Health Effects” brings together research on the health-related effects of potential functional food products, as well as applied research into healthy foods and biologically active food ingredients. Functional foods are foods that offer health benefits beyond their nutritional value. Food with increased health quality is important not only in order to maintain health but also to reduce the risk of disease. This Special Issue will be of interest to scientists, but above all health-conscious consumers. Functional foods can be considered in two categories: conventional, e.g., fruits, vegetables, seeds, legumes or fermented foods; and mofified, e.g., fortified dairy products, milk alternatives, cereal, juice or eggs. In addition to nutrient-rich ingredients, these also include foods fortified with vitamins, minerals, probiotics, and fiber. Functional foods may also prevent nutrient deficiencies as well as promote proper growth and development.

Subjects that will be discussed in this Special Issue will focus on bioactive compounds present in both natural plant and animal origin foods, designing functional products, and the verification of foods’ potential health-related properties in biological studies on animal models and/or in human studies.

Dr. Magdalena Franczyk-Zarow
Prof. Dr. Renata Kostogrys
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • functional food
  • plant and animal origin bioactive compounds
  • nutraceuticals (plant bioactives, dietary fibre, probiotics, prebiotics, functional lipids, bioactive peptides, vitamins, antioxidants, minerals, botanicals)
  • health-realted effects
  • potential health benefits
  • disease prevention
  • non-communicable diseases
  • animal research
  • human studies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1966 KiB  
Article
Protective Effects on Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells and Antioxidant Activity of Enzymatic Hydrolyzate from Silkworms Fed the Leaves of Cudrania tricuspidata
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 1733; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14051733 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 256
Abstract
We investigated the antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects of an enzymatic hydrolyzate from silkworms fed the leaves of Cudrania tricuspidata (ESLC) produced by enzymatic treatment. The proteins in silkworms fed the leaves of Cudrania tricuspidata (SLC) were effectively hydrolyzed using enzymatic treatment. The [...] Read more.
We investigated the antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects of an enzymatic hydrolyzate from silkworms fed the leaves of Cudrania tricuspidata (ESLC) produced by enzymatic treatment. The proteins in silkworms fed the leaves of Cudrania tricuspidata (SLC) were effectively hydrolyzed using enzymatic treatment. The total polyphenols of ESLC were significantly higher, and the superoxide dismutase-like activity and 2,2′-azino-bis (3-thylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonicacid) diammonium salt radical scavenging capacity of ESLC were significantly increased compared to the SLC group. We evaluated the properties of ESLC to protect SH-SY5Y cells from H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The viability rate of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells was significantly restored when treated with ESLC at a concentration of 100 μg/mL or 250 μg/mL. Furthermore, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was investigated, and ESLC significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38. Therefore, ESLC can potentially be used as an antioxidant. The polyphenol content increases owing to hydrolysis through enzymatic treatment, which increases the antioxidant effect and inhibits the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38 by activating the MAPK pathway, which inhibits cell death from oxidative stress and exerts cytoprotective effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods: Bioactivity and Potential Health Effects)
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13 pages, 1701 KiB  
Article
Effects of Hydrolysates from Silkworms Fed Cudrania tricuspidata Leaves on Improvement of Memory in Rats with Impaired Memory Induced by Scopolamine
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(21), 11656; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132111656 - 25 Oct 2023
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Abstract
This study investigated the memory-improving effects and mechanisms of action of hydrolysate from silkworm fed Cudrania tricuspidata leaves (HSCT) in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Thirty-two rats were categorized into 4 groups and the experiment was conducted for 6 weeks. The experimental diet [...] Read more.
This study investigated the memory-improving effects and mechanisms of action of hydrolysate from silkworm fed Cudrania tricuspidata leaves (HSCT) in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Thirty-two rats were categorized into 4 groups and the experiment was conducted for 6 weeks. The experimental diet groups are as follows: control, control diet; scopolamine, control diet + scopolamine (0.7 mg/kg); HSCT, HSCT diet + scopolamine (0.7 mg/kg); and donepezil, control diet + scopolamine (0.7 mg/kg) + donepezil (1.0 mg/kg). Except for the control group, the experimental groups received scopolamine 0.7 mg/kg intraperitoneally to induce decline in memory. Animal behavioral tests such as the Barnes maze, novel object recognition test, and Y-maze were performed to investigate the effects of HSCT on memory improvement. In addition, brain acetylcholine (ACh) concentration and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were assessed to investigate the mechanism of memory improvement. Results of the animal behavior test suggested that the rats administered HSCT displayed improved memory behavior compared to those administered scopolamine (p < 0.05). The concentration of Ach was increased in the HSCT group compared to the scopolamine group (p < 0.05), and the activity of AChE was significantly reduced (p < 0.05). These results suggest that HSCT effectively improves memory by reducing AChE activity and increasing ACh content in the brains of rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment. As a natural compound, HSCT has the potential to be used as a material to improve memory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods: Bioactivity and Potential Health Effects)
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22 pages, 1404 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Red Potato Pulp Preparation and Stage of Its Incorporation into Sourdough or Dough on the Quality and Health-Promoting Value of Bread
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(13), 7670; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13137670 - 28 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 699
Abstract
The quality and health-promoting properties of enriched bread depend not only on the composition of the additive but also on the baking technology. In this study, the preparation (rice flour, maltodextrin, and red potato pulp) was used in the amount of 5% of [...] Read more.
The quality and health-promoting properties of enriched bread depend not only on the composition of the additive but also on the baking technology. In this study, the preparation (rice flour, maltodextrin, and red potato pulp) was used in the amount of 5% of the flour in the recipe at various stages of bread production, i.e., during sourdough fermentation or dough kneading. The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of adding the preparation containing red potato pulp on the content of polyphenols and the ability to neutralize free radicals, nutritional composition, physical parameters, and quality of wheat–rye bread using two different baking technologies. The preparations made with red potato pulp are an excellent source of bioactive compounds. The breads with preparations added to the sourdough were characterized by greater volume and lower hardness, and higher levels of minerals and dietary fiber than breads with preparations added to the dough. It was found that the breads with preparations added to the dough were characterized by up to 4.5 times more polyphenols, 3.5 times more flavonoids, and 6 times more phenolic acids and flavonols than breads with preparations added to sourdough, which translated into their greater antioxidant potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods: Bioactivity and Potential Health Effects)
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