Spectroscopic Techniques in Biomedical Imaging and Analysis

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 2161

Special Issue Editors

Department of Life and Environmental, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona, Italy
Interests: vibrational spectroscopy; FTIR spectroscopy; Raman spectroscopy; chemometrics; spectropathology
Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona, Italy
Interests: histopathology; spectroscopy; microscopy; chemical biology
FOCAS Research Institute, Technological University Dublin, Dublin 8, Ireland
Interests: applications of spectroscopy and the study of molecular and nano-materials; recent activities have extended to biospectroscopy for diagnostics and biochemical analysis and nano-bio interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. School of Physics and Clinical and Optometric Sciences, Technological University Dublin, City Campus, Dublin 8, Ireland
2. Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Research Institute, Technological University Dublin, Camden Row, Dublin 8, Ireland
Interests: low dose radiation; non-targeted effects; out of field effects; individual radiosensitivity; biophotonics for cancer diagnosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Spectroscopic techniques are emerging tools for application within the biomedical field, particularly in their imaging and microscopic set-ups, which allow for their extensive use for screening, diagnostics, and monitoring purposes. These techniques include hyperspectral imaging in the UV/visible/Near IR and mid-IR spectral regions, Raman spectroscopic Imaging, Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering, Tip Enhanced Raman Scattering, and emerging hybrid modes incorporating photoacoustic and photothermal effects.

The research collected and compiled in the present Special Issue will be focused on the application of such spectroscopic imaging and analysis techniques in order to obtain high-resolution biomedical images of cells and tissues, shedding new light on biological mechanisms, pathological processes, and the modes of drug and/or pathogen action. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo applications will be considered. Moreover, all research dedicated to image-processing software and approaches are welcomed.

Dr. Valentina Notarstefano
Dr. Elisabetta Giorgini
Prof. Dr. Hugh J. Byrne
Prof. Dr. Fiona Lyng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • UV/visible spectroscopy
  • near IR spectroscopy
  • fluorescence spectroscopy
  • vibrational spectroscopy
  • hyperspectral imaging
  • biomedical
  • imaging
  • diagnostic

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 13246 KiB  
Article
Single-Image Multi-Parametric Representation of Optical Properties through Encodings to the HSV Color Space
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010155 - 23 Dec 2023
Viewed by 450
Abstract
The visualization of 2D clinical data often relies on color-coded images, but different colormaps can introduce cognitive biases, impacting result interpretation. Moreover, when using color for diagnosis with multiple biomarkers, the application of distinct colormaps for each parameter can hinder comparisons. Our aim [...] Read more.
The visualization of 2D clinical data often relies on color-coded images, but different colormaps can introduce cognitive biases, impacting result interpretation. Moreover, when using color for diagnosis with multiple biomarkers, the application of distinct colormaps for each parameter can hinder comparisons. Our aim was to introduce a visualization technique that utilizes the hue (H), saturation (S), and value (V) in a single image to convey multi-parametric data on various optical properties in an effective manner. To achieve this, we conducted a study involving two datasets, one comprising multi-modality measurements of the human aorta and the other featuring multiple parameters of dystrophic mice muscles. Through this analysis, we determined that H is best suited to emphasize differences related to pathology, while V highlights high-spatial-resolution data disparities, and color alterations effectively indicate changes in chemical component concentrations. Furthermore, encoding structural information as S and V within the same image assists in pinpointing the specific locations of these variations. In cases where all data are of a high resolution, H remains the optimal indicator of pathology, ensuring results’ interpretability. This approach simplifies the selection of an appropriate colormap and enhances the ability to grasp a sample’s characteristics at a single glance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopic Techniques in Biomedical Imaging and Analysis)
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15 pages, 2502 KiB  
Article
Novel Insights from Fourier-Transform InfraRed Imaging on the Morpho-Chemical Profile of Human Corpus Callosum
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 3954; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13063954 - 20 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1072
Abstract
The corpus callosum (CC) is the largest interhemispheric commissure of the mammalian brain, and it includes axons, cortical neurons, and glial cells. It is mainly composed of myelin, a lipidic sheath which is produced by glial cell membranes; myelin is wrapped up around [...] Read more.
The corpus callosum (CC) is the largest interhemispheric commissure of the mammalian brain, and it includes axons, cortical neurons, and glial cells. It is mainly composed of myelin, a lipidic sheath which is produced by glial cell membranes; myelin is wrapped up around axons and plays a fundamental role in the fast conduction of neuronal electrical signals. The human CC is divided into various anatomical regions, with different axonal composition, including, from front to back, genu, body or trunk, isthmus, and splenium. Corpus callosum undergoes some alterations not only in the presence of specific physiological and pathological conditions, but also because of aging. For the first time, in the present study a hyperspectral imaging analysis of human corpus callosum was performed. The study, carried out on CC autopsy samples collected from human adult males of different ages, was focused mainly on the genu and splenium regions. By combining Fourier-transform infrared imaging and histological analyses with multivariate and univariate ones, the macromolecular composition of these regions was defined, and age-related alterations in the lipid and protein components were identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopic Techniques in Biomedical Imaging and Analysis)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Spectroscopic techniques are emerging tools for applications in the biomedical field, in particular, in their imaging and microscopic set-ups, which allow exploitation of them for screening, diagnostics, and monitoring purposes. These techniques include hyperspectral imaging in the UV/visible/Near IR and mid-IR spectral regions, Raman spectroscopic Imaging, Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering, Tip Enhanced Raman Scattering, and emerging hybrid modes incorporating photoacoustic and photothermal effects.

The research works collected in the present Special Issue will be focused on the application of such spectroscopic imaging and analysis techniques to obtain high-resolution biomedical images of cells and
tissues, able to shed new light on biological mechanisms, pathological processes, and modes of action of drugs and/or pathogens. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo applications will be considered. Moreover, research
works dedicated to image processing software and approaches are welcomed.
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